Arturia Synthesizer: The Laboratory Hybrid


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Hey all,
First post here.
I'm mainly a guitar player, but have been playing classical piano for around 8 years. I've been asked now to play some organ, electric piano, and a little synth in a band and I want to buy a keyboard(?) to practice and sometimes rehearse on. While I've always played an acoustic upright piano, I did have a cheap yamaha keyboard with "touch response" keys that I really hated. I'd like to avoid that, and move in the direction of my friend's hammond (waterfall keys?) in terms of the keys. As for sounds, organ and electric piano are paramount and some reasonable synths would be good.

I've been looking at the Arturia Laboratory Hybrid Synthesizer, which I assume has all the sounds I need with "3500 synth sounds from Arturia's classic synth collection" right? As a "hybrid" midi controller with built in sounds, will I be able to bring this keyboard into the studio, plug it into the PA and play along with the band without a comuter? I wasn't planning on getting involved with the computer at all, but will that be a necessary step with this keyboard?

I'd like to spend $500 or less if possible. I was looking at the arturia because there's a special deal on it through Hello Music, but any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
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happyrat1

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The Arturia Laboratory Hybrid hardware is only a MIDI controller. It requires either a computer or a MIDI rack module to produce sound.

The cheapest, professional grade keys that aren't Yamaha would include the Korg X50 and the Roland Juno DI, both selling around the $699 mark.

Then again if yer really fussy about weighted style keys you won't really find much under a thousand.
 
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Or... look for a good deal on a Korg SP250. It isn't a lightweight; but it has a LOT of advantages over the typical 61-key boards regardless of the brand. It gives your choice of several organ voices, several electric piano voices, several acoustic piano voices, many other voices (harpsichord, strings, guitar, etc.) AND MIDI in/out, and weighted/graded keys (so it feels like a piano), the ability to layer any two voices, add reverb and chorus effects....

I bought mine brand new seven years ago for about $900, and have seen them used for less than $400 recently.

Oh yeah, and it has internal speakers for practicing.
 

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