Can I split the keyboard into three parts for a performance combination?


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I know how to split the keyboard into two parts to create a User performance combination, but I was wondering if I can split it into three parts. I'd just like to have a third instrument for an accent that doesn't come up for long in the song, but would be really nice to have. Any thoughts or work-arounds?
Thanks.
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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I don't think you mentioned the model of keyboard you're using, but as long as the keyboard can play multiple timbres on three or more different MIDI channels and has MIDI or USB-MIDI ports, you can do this-- although depending on the specifics, you might need to be connected to a computer or other device to do it.

I keep my Yamaha keyboards connected to my computer, and can easily split or layer the keyboard into several zones using a DAW. Basically, I turn off the keyboard's Local Control setting so it doesn't make any sounds when I play on it-- i.e., so it acts like a MIDI keyboard controller. Then I send the MIDI to my DAW on channel 1, but use the DAW's MIDI filtering capabilities to send the Note events back to the keyboard on different channels based on the Note values-- e.g., Note values 0 through 31 would be sent back on channel 1, Note values 32 through 63 would be sent back on channel 2, Note values 64 through 95 would be sent back on channel 3, and Note values 96 through 127 would be sent back on channel 4. (Those are just examples; you could use whatever ranges you want, and of course you'd really only be interested in the Note values that your keyboard can send-- so a 5-octave keyboard might send only Note values of 36 through 96, or something like that, although you could shift the values up or down using the keyboard's octave-shifting and transposing functions.) You can also overlap zones if you want, such as sending back Note values 32 through 63 on two or more different channels. And then all you have to do is send the desired Bank Select and Program Change values for each channel. So if your keyboard can play 16 MIDI channels, you can define up to 16 separate zones and split or layer them however you like.

Now, if your keyboard has MIDI DIN ports, you might be able to bypass the computer entirely and just connect a MIDI cable from the keyboard's MIDI OUT port to its MIDI IN port. Then, as long as you can program and filter the MIDI messages as needed on the keyboard itself to do something like what's described above, you can create multiple zones, each with its own sound. Or you might need to add another MIDI box or two between the MIDI OUT and the MIDI IN, such as a MIDI processor that can be programmed to filter and route the incoming MIDI based on Note values or something similar.
 
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I can't believe I forgot to mention the keyboard. It's a Roland Juno DS61. And oh my goodness, thank you so much for taking the time to provide me with all that terrific information. I have to confess that my level of expertise consists of following directions in the manual, and using the keyboard for performances using anything that's onboard. I've never connected it to a computer. I do have Midi in and out, so I'll tinker with your suggestions. Once again, thanks so much, and I'm sorry I wasn't more specific.


I don't think you mentioned the model of keyboard you're using, but as long as the keyboard can play multiple timbres on three or more different MIDI channels and has MIDI or USB-MIDI ports, you can do this-- although depending on the specifics, you might need to be connected to a computer or other device to do it.

I keep my Yamaha keyboards connected to my computer, and can easily split or layer the keyboard into several zones using a DAW. Basically, I turn off the keyboard's Local Control setting so it doesn't make any sounds when I play on it-- i.e., so it acts like a MIDI keyboard controller. Then I send the MIDI to my DAW on channel 1, but use the DAW's MIDI filtering capabilities to send the Note events back to the keyboard on different channels based on the Note values-- e.g., Note values 0 through 31 would be sent back on channel 1, Note values 32 through 63 would be sent back on channel 2, Note values 64 through 95 would be sent back on channel 3, and Note values 96 through 127 would be sent back on channel 4. (Those are just examples; you could use whatever ranges you want, and of course you'd really only be interested in the Note values that your keyboard can send-- so a 5-octave keyboard might send only Note values of 36 through 96, or something like that, although you could shift the values up or down using the keyboard's octave-shifting and transposing functions.) You can also overlap zones if you want, such as sending back Note values 32 through 63 on two or more different channels. And then all you have to do is send the desired Bank Select and Program Change values for each channel. So if your keyboard can play 16 MIDI channels, you can define up to 16 separate zones and split or layer them however you like.

Now, if your keyboard has MIDI DIN ports, you might be able to bypass the computer entirely and just connect a MIDI cable from the keyboard's MIDI OUT port to its MIDI IN port. Then, as long as you can program and filter the MIDI messages as needed on the keyboard itself to do something like what's described above, you can create multiple zones, each with its own sound. Or you might need to add another MIDI box or two between the MIDI OUT and the MIDI IN, such as a MIDI processor that can be programmed to filter and route the incoming MIDI based on Note values or something similar.
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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No problem! You posted in the Roland section, so I figured it was a Roland of some kind. :)

The best approach can depend on your situation-- i.e., whether it's possible/acceptable to connect the keyboard to a computer and use a DAW with it (which is great when playing/recording in a "home studio" situation), or whether it's preferable to avoid relying on a computer or laptop (which is often the case when performing live on a stage where you need to be able to set up and tear down quickly with a minimum of fuss).

If you have an iPad or other type of tablet, with a suitable USB connection, then you might be able to use an app to route and filter the MIDI. In fact, that might be a better alternative than using a MIDI processor box, since you most likely wouldn't need to buy anything extra.

But the general idea is that if you can route your keyboard's MIDI back to itself, you'll be able to use your keyboard as though it were a MIDI keyboard controller to play your keyboard as though it were a MIDI sound module, which sounds kind of weird at first but opens up all of your keyboard's potentials. Just don't forget to turn off Local Control when you do this-- and to turn it back on afterward. :)
 
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With my Korg Kross 2 if I create a Combination of instrument sounds I can set up the range within the keybed where each individual sound is active.

I can save the Combi as Korg calls it to a User bank and call it up as required.

So whilst it is not a series of splits the effect is the same for that specific Combi.

Maybe you can do something similar with your Juno.
 
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With my Korg Kross 2 if I create a Combination of instrument sounds I can set up the range within the keybed where each individual sound is active.

I can save the Combi as Korg calls it to a User bank and call it up as required.

So whilst it is not a series of splits the effect is the same for that specific Combi.

Maybe you can do something similar with your Juno.
Definitely a possibility. I'll play with that.
 
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In performance edit mode you can put different programs on different channels.
Set them to On.
Set the desired key ranges to each. They may overlap.
 

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