CASIO CPD-220R 1 finger chords different from Yamaha?


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My daughter is learning keyboard at school and we have just swapped out little Yamaha keyboard to a Casio digital piano.

However the keys she needs to press for some of the one fingered chords are totally different from the old keyboard and the school keyboards (mostly minor chords).

Has anyone encountered this or does anyone know how to re-program the Casio?

Thanks
Peter
 
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In the long term reprogramming your Daughter to play three fingered chords will be vastly more beneficial to her development.

Good habits learned young will last a lifetime.
 
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happyrat1

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Agreed. The inability to play chords with all her fingers is a crutch that will haunt your daughter for the rest of her life if she doesn't break the habit at a young age.

Whomever's teaching her should have informed you of that right from the start.

Otherwise I'd suggest finding a better teacher.

Gary ;)
 
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Yes and she hopes to learn how to play three fingered chords but at the moment we're stuck with the Casio being different from the Yamaha keyboard at school.
 

happyrat1

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Then it's still better if your daughter becomes adept at using both platforms ambidextrously.

In her future there will never be any guarantees what sort of keyboards the venue will supply so she'd better be able to switch on a dime.

Gary ;)
 

happyrat1

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BTW, in answer to your original question. Casio and Yamaha autochording systems are both incompatible and non configurable.

Either one assumes that you will stick with them for life. :p

Yet another good reason not to use either.

Gary ;)
 

Rayblewit

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Hey Biggles and Rat,
I think Peter is talking about some technical or physical problem here he thinks exists with one of the keyboards itself. Not the daughter's ability to learn proper fingered chords.

Having said that . . Peter, I would say your "little Yamaha" . is the problem here. It probably wasn't configured initially to play single finger (auto) chords other than majors. When you say little do you mean 4 octaves. These are like toys.

Now you have a digital piano with 88 keys . . I would say there are probably no problems with it.

Ray
 

happyrat1

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Words like "piano" and "keyboard" and "synthesizer" get thrown around interchangeably in these forums by people who are not hardware savvy.

It would really help cut thru the cheese around here if people would post some model numbers.

I assume by "casio piano" he means a CTK or WK or LK model with autochording since that's what he's asking about

Otherwise, it's a pointless query since Privia Electronic Pianos don't do autochording at all.

Gary ;)
 
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The Y_man

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Words like "piano" and "keyboard" and "synthesizer" get thrown around interchangeably in these forums by people who are not hardware savvy.

It would really help cut thru the cheese around here if people would post some model numbers.

I assume by "casio piano" he means a CTK or WK or LK model with autochording since that's what he's asking about

Otherwise, it's a pointless query since Privia Electronic Pianos don't do autochording at all.

Gary ;)
See title of thread - CDP series.

The Y-man
 

happyrat1

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oops...

Do the Casio CDP pianos do autochording?

Gary ;)
 

SeaGtGruff

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Unfortunately, as has already been said, Casio and Yamaha use different "one-finger" chord systems, and there's no way to configure one to act like the other. It's like they can't do things the same way as each other because it would cause legal problems and prevent them from being able to patent their "proprietary chord-fingering system." (I don't know if that's actually a thing, so I'm speaking with tongue in cheek; but they sure act like it's a thing.)
 
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. . .

Otherwise, it's a pointless query since Privia Electronic Pianos don't do autochording at all.

Gary ;)
My PX-350 does auto-chording quite well.

The manual describes several _different_ auto-chording schemes, and the menu system lets you pick one of them.

I suggest that the OP read the manual for his keyboard _very carefully_. If Casio was really smart (and patent law allowed it), they might include a "Yamaha-compatible" mode.

. Charles

PS -- and of course, learning to play chords with the left hand is a very good skill to have!
 

SeaGtGruff

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Unfortunately, while the Casio and Yamaha "one-finger"* methods do agree for major chords, they are quite different when it comes to the minor, seventh, and minor seventh chords:

Major = The root key (Casio)
Major = The root key (Yamaha)

Minor = The root key plus any one accompaniment key to the right of it (Casio)
Minor = The root key plus the nearest black key to the left of it (Yamaha)

Seventh = The root key plus any two accompaniment keys to the right of it (Casio)
Seventh = The root key plus the nearest white key to the left of it (Yamaha)

Minor Seventh = The root key plus any three accompaniment keys to the right of it (Casio)
Minor Seventh = The root key plus both the nearest white and black keys to the left of it (Yamaha)

Casio and Yamaha both have additional chord-fingering methods-- although the ones which are available may vary depending on the model-- but none of the other methods can emulate the "one-finger" method.

On the other hand, some of the "normal-fingering" methods-- where chords are played using their actual notes-- can usually identify a particular chord even if you drop one or more "unnecessary" notes of the chord. The specific notes (if any) which are considered "unnecessary" or "optional" will vary depending on the chord, since you can't drop a note that would make the chord's identity ambiguous-- e.g., you might be able to drop the fifth, but you wouldn't normally be able to drop the third, since that would make it impossible to know whether you want a major chord or a minor chord. Anyway, it might be possible to find some "abbreviated" normal-fingering chords which are the same on both models.

* I don't know why these are commonly called "one-finger" chords, since you must play two or more keys for the minor, seventh, and minor seventh chords. More properly, Casio calls it "Casio Chord" fingering, whereas Yamaha calls it "Easy Chords" fingering.
 
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Peter didn't gives his daughter's age, but I tend to side with Biggles and Gary regarding building a strong foundation for the future. Kids fingers and minds are much more nimble than us old farts, except I have been to recitals where kids didn't yet have the finger span to take on certain chords. Heck, I don't have the finger span to take on certain chords written by Liszt or Gershwin.

So to summarize, Peter's daughter is probably getting free lessons at school using a method that uses one-finger chords, and they just bought an electric piano that is apparently not compatible with the school's method and instrument. From Peter's second post it appears he is inclined to stick with the school's program at the moment. One thing I have not seen suggested yet is to talk to the school's teacher about this. Perhaps the teacher already has a preferred method of dealing with this problem, it cannot be that unique.

Good luck! I hope your daughter develops a love of playing music. - Greg
 

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