Chord inversions. When?

Discussion in 'General Keyboard Discussion' started by Joe03, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Joe03

    Joe03

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    As some know here I am newer to the “playing of the keys” and working on chord inversions.
    My question, When? In the music I am learning right now it’s handling left hand work with just a chord note (C,F,G) above the staff. Let’s say G. While I can figure out keys for the chord, in any form, how do I know if is the proper....... inversion to use.? Just because it’s easier? Or out of the way of the right hand?.
    I need to know........l....
     
    Joe03, Sep 30, 2018
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  2. Joe03

    CowboyNQ

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    Firstly, what sounds good to your ear.

    Secondly, what allows you to move from chord to chord with minimal shift in hand and finger position.
     
    CowboyNQ, Oct 1, 2018
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  3. Joe03

    Joe03

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    2 excellent answers, thanks. The left hand at times mystifies me, not really sure why.
     
    Joe03, Oct 1, 2018
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  4. Joe03

    Rayblewit Love Music / Love Life

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    The left hand for me co-ordinates my chords nicelly. 90 percent of them are inversions. I cannot play chords with my right hand. Just melody usually one finger or 2 finger notes. How we are different eh! But what @CowboyNQ said . . it sounds good to MY ears. (no one elses!! just mine lol!)
    Ray
     
    Rayblewit, Oct 1, 2018
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  5. Joe03

    Biggles

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    A while back I posted this to someone who could not get there head around inversions, it leads up to a little exercise
    .
    Using C to keep everything on the white notes

    Play a root C chord, C E G

    Now take your finger off the C and play the C one octave higher, this is the First Inversion.

    Now playing the G and C move the E one octave higher, this is the Second Inversion

    That is it, at its simplest this is the same for all three note chords

    Try this play Root C, 2nd inversion F and 2nd inversion G, take note of how little you have to move your hand.

    This is the beauty of learning inversions.
     
    Biggles, Oct 1, 2018
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    RobG

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    You can also do 2nd inversion F (C-F-A) and 1st Inversion G (B-D-G) with root C (C-E-G) in any I-IV-V progression, it allows for really easy changes. Works really well especially if you are doing organ stuff.

    Also, 2 handed chord with 7ths is where the beauty of inversions really comes in. You can get some nice chord voicings without super complex shapes.

    From a band standpoint, in an overall band mix sometimes inversions can be key to not encroaching on other people's sonic space.
     
    RobG, Nov 6, 2018
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  7. Joe03

    Rayblewit Love Music / Love Life

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    I had a crack at playing "Tequila"

    It has quick and frequent chord changes in it From F to Eb.

    Having adapted the F inversion technique which I always use . .it is very tricky to switch to Eb.
    Now I have to educate my fingers to adapt the conventional F chord (FAC) as it make for an easy transition to Eb

    So, not all situations by using inversions is convenient.

    Ray
     
    Rayblewit, Nov 6, 2018
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