Chord inversions. When?

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As some know here I am newer to the “playing of the keys” and working on chord inversions.
My question, When? In the music I am learning right now it’s handling left hand work with just a chord note (C,F,G) above the staff. Let’s say G. While I can figure out keys for the chord, in any form, how do I know if is the proper....... inversion to use.? Just because it’s easier? Or out of the way of the right hand?.
I need to know........l....
 
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Firstly, what sounds good to your ear.

Secondly, what allows you to move from chord to chord with minimal shift in hand and finger position.
 
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Firstly, what sounds good to your ear.

Secondly, what allows you to move from chord to chord with minimal shift in hand and finger position.
2 excellent answers, thanks. The left hand at times mystifies me, not really sure why.
 

Rayblewit

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The left hand at times mystifies me, not really sure why.
The left hand for me co-ordinates my chords nicelly. 90 percent of them are inversions. I cannot play chords with my right hand. Just melody usually one finger or 2 finger notes. How we are different eh! But what @CowboyNQ said . . it sounds good to MY ears. (no one elses!! just mine lol!)
Ray
 
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A while back I posted this to someone who could not get there head around inversions, it leads up to a little exercise
.
Using C to keep everything on the white notes

Play a root C chord, C E G

Now take your finger off the C and play the C one octave higher, this is the First Inversion.

Now playing the G and C move the E one octave higher, this is the Second Inversion

That is it, at its simplest this is the same for all three note chords

Try this play Root C, 2nd inversion F and 2nd inversion G, take note of how little you have to move your hand.

This is the beauty of learning inversions.
 
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A while back I posted this to someone who could not get there head around inversions, it leads up to a little exercise
.
Using C to keep everything on the white notes

Play a root C chord, C E G

Now take your finger off the C and play the C one octave higher, this is the First Inversion.

Now playing the G and C move the E one octave higher, this is the Second Inversion

That is it, at its simplest this is the same for all three note chords

Try this play Root C, 2nd inversion F and 2nd inversion G, take note of how little you have to move your hand.

This is the beauty of learning inversions.
You can also do 2nd inversion F (C-F-A) and 1st Inversion G (B-D-G) with root C (C-E-G) in any I-IV-V progression, it allows for really easy changes. Works really well especially if you are doing organ stuff.

Also, 2 handed chord with 7ths is where the beauty of inversions really comes in. You can get some nice chord voicings without super complex shapes.

From a band standpoint, in an overall band mix sometimes inversions can be key to not encroaching on other people's sonic space.
 

Rayblewit

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I had a crack at playing "Tequila"

It has quick and frequent chord changes in it From F to Eb.

Having adapted the F inversion technique which I always use . .it is very tricky to switch to Eb.
Now I have to educate my fingers to adapt the conventional F chord (FAC) as it make for an easy transition to Eb

So, not all situations by using inversions is convenient.

Ray
 
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