Cubase and Linux??

Discussion in 'alt.steinberg.cubase' started by lancelightning, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. Its probably been explored here before, but has anyone here
    successfully managed to get a version of Cubase working under Linux?

    My main system works fine...Win7, C5 etc..but I'm toying with the idea
    of installing something like Ubuntu onto a spare notebook just to see
    what, if anything, can be achieved.

    I've read that you need something called 'Wine' in order to run
    Windows stuff...and I've heard of another app called 'Jack'. Also
    there's a DAW called 'Ardour', though I know nothing about its
    capabilities..

    I'm totally green when it comes to anything outside of Windows so any
    advice would be welcome. It isn't of any major importance...its just
    something I fancy playing around with.

    LL
     
    lancelightning, Aug 22, 2010
    #1
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  2. lancelightning

    Alex Clemons Guest

    On Sep 10, 1:47 pm, Alex Clemons <> wrote:
    > On Aug 22, 5:48 pm, lancelightning <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Its probably been explored here before, but has anyone here
    > > successfully managed to get a version of Cubase working under Linux?

    >
    > > My main system works fine...Win7, C5 etc..but I'm toying with the idea
    > > of installing something like Ubuntu onto a spare notebook just to see
    > > what, if anything, can be achieved.

    >
    > > I've read that you need something called 'Wine' in order to run
    > > Windows stuff...and I've heard of another app called 'Jack'. Also
    > > there's a DAW called 'Ardour', though I know nothing about its
    > > capabilities..

    >
    > > I'm totally green when it comes to anything outside of Windows so any
    > > advice would be welcome. It isn't of any major importance...its just
    > > something I fancy playing around with.

    >
    > > LL

    >
    > Personally, I think you'd be better off spending any time you have set
    > aside for trying to get Cubase to run in Ubuntu on learning all the
    > features Cubase has to offer. If it works fine for you in W7, enjoy
    > it; Cubase is a pretty deep piece of software. If you want something
    > to play around with, head over to kvraudio.com, pick up some of the
    > free vst effects they have listed, and mess with those.- Hide quoted text-
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Also, I have played around with Ardour a bit in the past, but I never
    thought of it as a serious tool. I know of at least one studio that
    uses it exclusively, and from what I understand they're happy with
    their open-source solution to the music industry. I've listened to a
    few of their tracks and wasn't impressed with the quality of the mix,
    but then again I've listening to tracks from $$$$$ ProTools setups and
    have been even less impressed. I think what it comes down to is using
    what you're comfortable with and the mastering "good" mixing skills;
    some of my favorite songs were recorded/mixed on 2 track analog gear
    and sound far better than 90% of what we hear on the radio today.
     
    Alex Clemons, Sep 10, 2010
    #2
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  3. On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:57:21 -0700 (PDT), Alex Clemons
    <> wrote:

    >On Sep 10, 1:47 pm, Alex Clemons <> wrote:
    >> On Aug 22, 5:48 pm, lancelightning <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Its probably been explored here before, but has anyone here
    >> > successfully managed to get a version of Cubase working under Linux?

    >>
    >> > My main system works fine...Win7, C5 etc..but I'm toying with the idea
    >> > of installing something like Ubuntu onto a spare notebook just to see
    >> > what, if anything, can be achieved.

    >>
    >> > I've read that you need something called 'Wine' in order to run
    >> > Windows stuff...and I've heard of another app called 'Jack'. Also
    >> > there's a DAW called 'Ardour', though I know nothing about its
    >> > capabilities..

    >>
    >> > I'm totally green when it comes to anything outside of Windows so any
    >> > advice would be welcome. It isn't of any major importance...its just
    >> > something I fancy playing around with.

    >>
    >> > LL

    >>
    >> Personally, I think you'd be better off spending any time you have set
    >> aside for trying to get Cubase to run in Ubuntu on learning all the
    >> features Cubase has to offer. If it works fine for you in W7, enjoy
    >> it; Cubase is a pretty deep piece of software. If you want something
    >> to play around with, head over to kvraudio.com, pick up some of the
    >> free vst effects they have listed, and mess with those.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >Also, I have played around with Ardour a bit in the past, but I never
    >thought of it as a serious tool. I know of at least one studio that
    >uses it exclusively, and from what I understand they're happy with
    >their open-source solution to the music industry. I've listened to a
    >few of their tracks and wasn't impressed with the quality of the mix,
    >but then again I've listening to tracks from $$$$$ ProTools setups and
    >have been even less impressed. I think what it comes down to is using
    >what you're comfortable with and the mastering "good" mixing skills;
    >some of my favorite songs were recorded/mixed on 2 track analog gear
    >and sound far better than 90% of what we hear on the radio today.


    Thanks for your answers...I know my way round Cubase well enough and
    I'm happy with my Win 7 installation. It was more a matter of
    curiosity really. I have a spare notebook and I loaded up Ubuntu. The
    installation was easy and I was impressed by the fact that most of the
    notebook's drivers were present and working...far better than Windows.
    It looks good for surfing and general pc work but unfortunately
    that''s where the good news ends really.

    I havn't tried Ardour yet but, as you say, opinions are mixed. There
    is an application called 'Wine' which in theory should allow likes of
    Cubase to run..but it appears to involve a lot of messing about. I
    spent a couple of hours the other day and I couldn't get anything to
    work with it. I think I'll stick with the devil I know.

    LL
     
    lancelightning, Sep 11, 2010
    #3
  4. lancelightning

    Rich Guest

    On Sep 11, 8:00 am, lancelightning <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:57:21 -0700 (PDT), Alex Clemons
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On Sep 10, 1:47 pm, Alex Clemons <> wrote:
    > >> On Aug 22, 5:48 pm, lancelightning <> wrote:

    >
    > >> > Its probably been explored here before, but has anyone here
    > >> > successfully managed to get a version of Cubase working under Linux?

    >
    > >> > My main system works fine...Win7, C5 etc..but I'm toying with the idea
    > >> > of installing something like Ubuntu onto a spare notebook just to see
    > >> > what, if anything, can be achieved.

    >
    > >> > I've read that you need something called 'Wine' in order to run
    > >> > Windows stuff...and I've heard of another app called 'Jack'. Also
    > >> > there's a DAW called 'Ardour', though I know nothing about its
    > >> > capabilities..

    >
    > >> > I'm totally green when it comes to anything outside of Windows so any
    > >> > advice would be welcome. It isn't of any major importance...its just
    > >> > something I fancy playing around with.

    >
    > >> > LL

    >
    > >> Personally, I think you'd be better off spending any time you have set
    > >> aside for trying to get Cubase to run in Ubuntu on learning all the
    > >> features Cubase has to offer. If it works fine for you in W7, enjoy
    > >> it; Cubase is a pretty deep piece of software. If you want something
    > >> to play around with, head over to kvraudio.com, pick up some of the
    > >> free vst effects they have listed, and mess with those.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > >Also, I have played around with Ardour a bit in the past, but I never
    > >thought of it as a serious tool. I know of at least one studio that
    > >uses it exclusively, and from what I understand they're happy with
    > >their open-source solution to the music industry. I've listened to a
    > >few of their tracks and wasn't impressed with the quality of the mix,
    > >but then again I've listening to tracks from $$$$$ ProTools setups and
    > >have been even less impressed. I think what it comes down to is using
    > >what you're comfortable with and the mastering "good" mixing skills;
    > >some of my favorite songs were recorded/mixed on 2 track analog gear
    > >and sound far better than 90% of what we hear on the radio today.

    >
    > Thanks for your answers...I know my way round Cubase well enough and
    > I'm happy with my Win 7 installation. It was more a matter of
    > curiosity really. I have a spare notebook and I loaded up Ubuntu. The
    > installation was easy and I was impressed by the fact that most of the
    > notebook's drivers were present and working...far better than Windows.
    > It looks good for surfing and general pc work but unfortunately
    > that''s where the good news ends really.
    >
    > I havn't tried Ardour yet but, as you say, opinions are mixed. There
    > is an application called 'Wine' which in theory should allow  likes of
    > Cubase to run..but it appears to involve a lot of messing about. I
    > spent a couple of hours the other day and I couldn't get anything to
    > work with it.  I think I'll stick with the devil I know.
    >
    > LL


    I know this thread is like one month old already but it catched my eye
    in a google search, to be honest you're much better running cubase in
    windows since running it under wine will hurt the performance (you
    will be running 2 different systems side by side) or at least
    something like 1.5 systems since you are loading a lot of libraries
    from windows, also it's an audio program which may need other
    libraries not just the basic ones so it may not run, if you want to
    play with linux try running ardour or rosegarden instead as those are
    native tools, and as you may know in audio production programs are
    hungry of resources and hardware access so the best way is to go
    native.
     
    Rich, Oct 5, 2010
    #4
  5. lancelightning

    Andy Kennedy Guest

    Rich <> wrote
    >On Sep 11, 8:00=A0am, lancelightning <> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:57:21 -0700 (PDT), Alex Clemons
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> <> wrote:
    >> >On Sep 10, 1:47=A0pm, Alex Clemons <> wrote:
    >> >> On Aug 22, 5:48=A0pm, lancelightning <> wrote:

    >>
    >> >> > Its probably been explored here before, but has anyone here
    >> >> > successfully managed to get a version of Cubase working under Linux?

    >>
    >> >> > My main system works fine...Win7, C5 etc..but I'm toying with the id=

    >ea
    >> >> > of installing something like Ubuntu onto a spare notebook just to se=

    >e
    >> >> > what, if anything, can be achieved.

    >>
    >> >> > I've read that you need something called 'Wine' in order to run
    >> >> > Windows stuff...and I've heard of another app called 'Jack'. Also
    >> >> > there's a DAW called 'Ardour', though I know nothing about its
    >> >> > capabilities..

    >>
    >> >> > I'm totally green when it comes to anything outside of Windows so an=

    >y
    >> >> > advice would be welcome. It isn't of any major importance...its just
    >> >> > something I fancy playing around with.

    >>
    >> >> > LL

    >>
    >> >> Personally, I think you'd be better off spending any time you have set
    >> >> aside for trying to get Cubase to run in Ubuntu on learning all the
    >> >> features Cubase has to offer. If it works fine for you in W7, enjoy
    >> >> it; Cubase is a pretty deep piece of software. If you want something
    >> >> to play around with, head over to kvraudio.com, pick up some of the
    >> >> free vst effects they have listed, and mess with those.- Hide quoted t=

    >ext -
    >>
    >> >> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >> >Also, I have played around with Ardour a bit in the past, but I never
    >> >thought of it as a serious tool. I know of at least one studio that
    >> >uses it exclusively, and from what I understand they're happy with
    >> >their open-source solution to the music industry. I've listened to a
    >> >few of their tracks and wasn't impressed with the quality of the mix,
    >> >but then again I've listening to tracks from $$$$$ ProTools setups and
    >> >have been even less impressed. I think what it comes down to is using
    >> >what you're comfortable with and the mastering "good" mixing skills;
    >> >some of my favorite songs were recorded/mixed on 2 track analog gear
    >> >and sound far better than 90% of what we hear on the radio today.

    >>
    >> Thanks for your answers...I know my way round Cubase well enough and
    >> I'm happy with my Win 7 installation. It was more a matter of
    >> curiosity really. I have a spare notebook and I loaded up Ubuntu. The
    >> installation was easy and I was impressed by the fact that most of the
    >> notebook's drivers were present and working...far better than Windows.
    >> It looks good for surfing and general pc work but unfortunately
    >> that''s where the good news ends really.
    >>
    >> I havn't tried Ardour yet but, as you say, opinions are mixed. There
    >> is an application called 'Wine' which in theory should allow =A0likes of
    >> Cubase to run..but it appears to involve a lot of messing about. I
    >> spent a couple of hours the other day and I couldn't get anything to
    >> work with it. =A0I think I'll stick with the devil I know.
    >>
    >> LL

    >
    >I know this thread is like one month old already but it catched my eye
    >in a google search, to be honest you're much better running cubase in
    >windows since running it under wine will hurt the performance (you
    >will be running 2 different systems side by side) or at least
    >something like 1.5 systems since you are loading a lot of libraries
    >from windows, also it's an audio program which may need other
    >libraries not just the basic ones so it may not run, if you want to
    >play with linux try running ardour or rosegarden instead as those are
    >native tools, and as you may know in audio production programs are
    >hungry of resources and hardware access so the best way is to go
    >native


    It won't work, well not properly. I've spent many years buggering abou
    with Wine in Linux and it is very limited. Wine is OK for running M
    Office (until you want to print something). Don't waste your time. Linux is
    excellent for native open-source software. Probably the only way you
    could do it is to run a Windows virtual machine in Linux but that would be
    slow, cut your RAM allocation in half and would be pointless.
    --
    Jazzdude
     
    Andy Kennedy, Oct 19, 2010
    #5
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