Damper/Sustain Pedal Functioning as Volume Pedal (Roland RD-300sx, DP-10)


Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
I've been having trouble with the damper/sustain pedal in my keyboard (RD-300sx). It used to damper the sound when put into the damper pedal input, but now it only changes the volume. When the pedal is set to continuous and is depressed the volume increases, when the pedal is not depressed it makes a very faint sound. When the pedal is not plugged in the keyboard makes no sound. The control port does the same thing (though it varies depending on how the control port is setup). When set to "switch" mode, the pedal doesn't respond (unless in the control port, to switch on rhythm for example). I've read through the manual many times but can't figure out what is wrong.

I tried using the pedal in a simpler keyboard and it worked properly so I don't think its the pedal. I used a different pedal at guitar center (though very similar one in terms of design) and it worked the same way.

The keyboard seems to know what it is doing and is stable, just it is not doing the right function. Any thoughts?
 
Ad

Advertisements

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
11,107
Reaction score
4,710
Location
GTA, Canada
My advice would be to back up your settings and patches and perform a factory reset.

Gary ;)
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Hi Gary!

Thank you for the advice.

The factory reset didn't fix the issue:/
Blah
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
3,743
Reaction score
1,588
It sounds like the polarity might be the opposite of what's expected. Check the setting that's described on page 38. Whichever one it's set to, set it to the other one and see if that does the trick. Or, if the pedal itself has a switch to control its polarity, try switching it the other way and leaving the keyboard's setting alone.

Also, on some keyboards the polarity can be read backwards depending on whether you plug the pedal into the keyboard before or after the keyboard's power is turned on. The manual says that the pedal should be plugged in while the keyboard's power is off, so if you're plugging it in while the keyboard is already turned on then the keyboard could be reading the pedal's polarity backwards.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
It sounds like the polarity might be the opposite of what's expected. Check the setting that's described on page 38. Whichever one it's set to, set it to the other one and see if that does the trick. Or, if the pedal itself has a switch to control its polarity, try switching it the other way and leaving the keyboard's setting alone.

Also, on some keyboards the polarity can be read backwards depending on whether you plug the pedal into the keyboard before or after the keyboard's power is turned on. The manual says that the pedal should be plugged in while the keyboard's power is off, so if you're plugging it in while the keyboard is already turned on then the keyboard could be reading the pedal's polarity backwards.

Thank you for your reply! I'm counting on replies. Especially thanks for taking the time to check the manual (page 38 and I have become good friends).

I tried changing the polarity to both settings but it doesn't have any affect on the pedal's function (which is strange). I would expect that if I reversed the polarity the keyboard would make sound when the pedal is up and silence/lower the sound (volume/level) when depressed; but it is producing the same output regardless of the setting. Interestingly I went to guitar center to try one of their pedals (hoping it'd fix my issue). The pedal was very similar so I'm still going to try a friend's simple pedal today, but guitar center's pedal controlled the volume in reverse, rather than damping (its polarity must automatically be reversed; also my roland pedal has no polarity switch).

I've tried a few combinations of power on and power off, I also did see that it says not to plug the pedal in and out when the power is on, which I'm sure we have done at some or a many points, i hope it didn't get damaged (thought it seems to work predictably).

Not that the control switch should be relevant but I've tried a number of things. One is that the "soft" and "sustenuto" settings seem to control volume just like the damper is doing. BUT when I set it to "rhythm start/stop" it can start and stop the rhythm without any trouble (p. 40). When the control is set to rhythm and the pedal is in the damper though, it doesn't start and stop the rhythm (if the damper and control inputs got crossed, I would expect the damper to also start/stop the rhythm).

According to the manual the only thing that should change regarding the damper is the polarity (p. 38), and whether it is set on or off (page 43), so I'm not sure why it is changing the volume.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2016
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hi - I have the same problem with my RD-300SX: Standard Roland pedal acting as a volume (expression) pedal when plugged into the damper socket. I have tried a factory reset, and played with all the settings that affect the control and damper pedals, but all to no avail. With no pedal plugged into the damper socket, or with a pedal plugged in and not depressed, no sound comes out of the phones or line out outputs. When I press the damper pedal the sound emerges getting louder the more I depress the pedal. Did you manage to fix the problem in your keyboard?
 
Ad

Advertisements

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
11,107
Reaction score
4,710
Location
GTA, Canada
There are three types of pedal in use in the industry today.

1) Plain old SPST switch. Used for Sustain, Sostenudo and Damper (not half damper capable). (some include switchable polarity while others are normally open or normally closed.. Depends on Manufacturer which type your keyboard takes.) Has standard TS connector.

2) SPDT Switch. Used exclusively for half dampering. Not sure about polarities. Uses TRS connector.

3) CC pedal or Continuous Controller Pedal. Uses an internal potentiometer to deliver a varying signal to the keyboard. Used for Expression or Wah on Keyboards. Again polarity and also total impedance dependent on manufacturer. Uses TRS connector.

Some keyboards can also auto sense polarity and type of pedal and assign accordingly.

My guess Dennis, is that you have a CC expression pedal hooked to the socket instead of a simple switch and that is why it is registered as expression rather than switch.

Check google and your manufacturer's specs to see if you are using the appropriate pedal.

Gary ;)
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Hi all,

Long story short I gave up on getting my friend's keyboard fixed. I'd still appreciate any thoughts that want to visit this thread though. Thought I'd log back in to reply though for Dennis^^

Thanks for your post Happyrat:) For me, pedal I used was the one that came with the keyboard and had previously worked properly as a damper. It also works as a damper in other keyboards. I also tried two other dampers (one cheap one of a different brand that we had and one that I borrowed at guitar center haha). Sadly they all did the same thing:/
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top