Easy way to work in sequencer!


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SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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I'm not sure how to answer that question.

First of all, XML or Extensible Markup Language is simply an information format or meta-language, so an XML file could potentially contain a wide variety of information that's encoded using a wide variety of tags.

And second, there are many MIDI sequencer programs available, and their capabilities can vary greatly.

So the answer to your question would really be found by checking in the documentation for your chosen MIDI sequencer to see whether it can handle XML files in general, and if so, which types of XML files it can handle. For instance, some DAWs can use XML files which contain information about the instrument sounds of a given keyboard, so that you can import an "instrument definition" or "patch list" for your keyboard using an XML file, but that doesn't necessarily mean those DAWs can use XML files which contain other types of information.
 
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@Roman Koval Further, the MuseScore product (amongst 250+ others - see https://www.musicxml.com/software/) is capable of using the MusicXML format directly. Like XML, it's more of a data interchange format, rather than a 'native' format (like .mid and .syx files) for use in sequencers, DAWs, etc.

Some of the advantages of MusicXML are that:-
  • it's plain ASCII text, which is simpler to transfer between different platforms, operating systems, etc... and is (relatively) easy to render on a web site and other HTML/XML -type interfaces - see https://www.verovio.org/musicxml.html for an example use;

  • a lot of people are already familiar with manipulating hierarchical data structures stored in variants of XML; and

  • a lot of modern software development tools have packages/modules available that simplify moving data between XML and other specialized formats, such as MIDI, System Exclusive, synthesizer patch formats, etc... although, some tools (such as Perl & Python) do include packages/modules that will manipulate MIDI data and .mid files directly.
Whether it's 'easier' really depends on what you want to do with the 'music' (in whatever format it is). Providing your software can deal with the format... or you have a suitable tool to do the conversions, it doesn't really matter.

--ozboomer
 

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