Favorite baroque/classical/romantic musician?


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Joined
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Oh so many to chose from!

Piano:

  • Mozart - his piano sonatas are just so much fun to pick up and play. Once you can play one, the rest fall into place fairly quickly. Also, listening to them whilst working gives you at least +10 algebra....
  • Grieg - Lyric Pieces = sublime! Fantastic tone paintings. And the piano concerto.
  • Rachmaninov - Preludes. You can't count yourself a pianist until you've played Prelude No.1 in C# Minor.
  • Khatchaturian - for his Tocatta for Piano. I don't care if he's written anything else, that's awesome enough for me.
In general:

  • Beethoven - a true orchestral master!
  • Copland - for Appalachian Spring, and Symphony No. 3, which is essentially a fantasy on Fanfare for the Common Man.
  • Bernstein - noone has better mastered the melding of jazz and classical.
  • Anything Rennaisance/Medieval, in particular the polyphony of Tallis, Allegri and Palestrina, the madrigals of Morley, Gibbons and Weelkes, and the numerous dances and other such things by Anonymous.;)
  • Handel - from the point of view of a trumpet player, he has some truly sparkling pieces that really show off trumpet as an instrument.
I'll leave it there - if we want to include the Modern and Avant-garde movements, this would at least twice as long...
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
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Mexico
Oh so many to chose from!

Piano:

  • Mozart - his piano sonatas are just so much fun to pick up and play. Once you can play one, the rest fall into place fairly quickly. Also, listening to them whilst working gives you at least +10 algebra....
  • Grieg - Lyric Pieces = sublime! Fantastic tone paintings. And the piano concerto.
  • Rachmaninov - Preludes. You can't count yourself a pianist until you've played Prelude No.1 in C# Minor.
  • Khatchaturian - for his Tocatta for Piano. I don't care if he's written anything else, that's awesome enough for me.
In general:

  • Beethoven - a true orchestral master!
  • Copland - for Appalachian Spring, and Symphony No. 3, which is essentially a fantasy on Fanfare for the Common Man.
  • Bernstein - noone has better mastered the melding of jazz and classical.
  • Anything Rennaisance/Medieval, in particular the polyphony of Tallis, Allegri and Palestrina, the madrigals of Morley, Gibbons and Weelkes, and the numerous dances and other such things by Anonymous.;)
  • Handel - from the point of view of a trumpet player, he has some truly sparkling pieces that really show off trumpet as an instrument.
I'll leave it there - if we want to include the Modern and Avant-garde movements, this would at least twice as long...
Mmmm.... I have to find that piece. I guess I have one of his sheet music here.
 
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