Help :( Changing Accompliment type (?)


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Hey, I'm new to keyboard and kind of stuck.
I've been getting lessons on a Casio keyboard.

The auto-accompliment on the Casio Keyboard considers the A and B key to be an A minor but my Yamaha auto-accompliment that I have at home considers it a B7. A minor on Yamaha I have found out is A and A flat.

Is there any way to change it to Casio style? The keyboard model I have is a Yamaha E363.

Thanks!
 
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Welcome.

Am is A, C & E and the Casio looks to as if it is set up to recognise chords in a different way, the Yamaha sees your finger combination as B 7 Major.

Without the Casio model number we cannot see if there is a way of changing the Casio triggering system, with these keyboards they are set to recognise Major chords by a single key press and Minor by a two key press hence Casio has one combo and Yamaha a different Combo.

OK that all said, I would really suggest that you try to learn to finger chords correctly and by that I mean at using three fingers for Major and Minor chords.

Once you are comfortable with three fingering Major and Minor chords do work on learning them as inversions in first and second positions.
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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There's no way to convert Yamaha's "one-finger chords" to work like Casio's.

The way Yamaha's works is as follows:

1 key pressed = major chord of whatever that key is
Examples:
C = C Major
Eb = Eb Major
F# = F# Major

2 keys pressed, same as above plus first black key to its left = minor chord
Examples:
C plus Bb = C Minor
Eb plus Db = Eb Minor
F# plus D# = F# Minor

2 keys pressed, same as above but first white key to the left = seventh chord
Examples:
C plus B = C Seventh
Eb plus D = Eb Seventh
F# plus F = F# Seventh

3 keys pressed, same as above but first white key and first black key to the left = minor seventh chord
Examples:
C plus B and Bb = C Minor Seventh
Eb plus D and Db = Eb Minor Seventh
F# plus F and D# = F# Minor Seventh

It's actually best to learn how to play chords using their full fingerings rather than relying on Casio's or Yamaha's "one-finger" methods. But if your teacher insists that you learn to play an auto accompaniment using "one-finger" chords, you'll have to learn it both ways-- the way that your keyboard at home uses, as well as the way that your teacher's keyboard in class uses.
 

Rayblewit

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It's actually best to learn how to play chords using their full fingerings
I would really suggest that you try to learn to finger chords correctly and by that I mean at using three fingers
I concur!
I find the single finger method is far more complicated than 3 finger chords.
Learning 3 finger chords was the best thing I did and Inversions makes playing even more fluent.
Also, @KyoDaz by doing this you can play any brand keyboard, Yamaha, Casio etc. . No confusion!
 
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Try this.

Play a C chord with three fingers (using your 1st, 3rd & 5th fingers) and hold the keys down, C, E & G. Now count the unplayed notes between each finger. These unplayed key numbers are the same for all Major chords.

So for a Major chord its three and two, and for a Minor chord it is two unplayed notes then three.

There you go you have just learned the Major and Minor chords in the time it has taken to read this.

Practice random chord playing and your fingers will quickly learn muscle memory and the chords will be second nature.
 

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