Hi Everyone. I'm new to keys and the forum...


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But I'm not new to music. I've been playing guitar for many years and I think I've forgotten more about music than I have retained. That said, since covid started I've had a lot more time on my hands working from home so I've been playing guitar more and I've decided to take up playing keyboard. It's something that I've had in the back of my mind for a long time but never had the time to seriously dedicate to more than one instrument. I'm officially four days in so I thought I'd look into what resources are available and came across this forum. I'm starting from ground zero doing hand coordination exercises on the keys as well as posture and proper hand position. I have a lot to learn and I'm looking forward to chatting with you about all this stuff.
 
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Welcome

Do take a look at Gary’s sticky threads in the Technique & Posture section.

You may also like to amend your Profile to include the Country you are in and to add a Signature listing your preferred name and the keyboard you are using.
 
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Thanks for the tips. I will definitely check out the stickies. I updated my profile but I won't list my keyboard since what I'm using to start out with is a bit embarrassing... an ancient Yamaha PSR and a midi keyboard controller hooked to my laptop. I'm not going to rush out and buy anything nice until I have some idea of what I need.
 

Rayblewit

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Hi Mark,
Welcome to the forums.
Many new people lately have introduced themselves and then just disappeared. I have a feeling about you that you will stick around.
I also play PSR type keyboard with ACMP.
Is that your intention too?
You mentioned learning hand coordination.
Playing left hand chords or bass or both? Playing right hand melody would be a lot different than stumming too. I am not a guitar player, but I know a few people who are, and manage the change . . hand coordination okay.
I play my music from sheets. Many have guitar tabs printed above the treble cleff. You can adapt these tabs to your right hand no worries with ACMP.
Good luck. Enjoy the challenge. Ask many questions.
Ray
 
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It does not matter what you are playing, its the playing that matters.

You have a PSR, so you have an arranger and using the ACMP feature will get you going pretty quickly.

Chords with left hand and melody line with right hand will get you playing recognisable songs.

Meanwhile look up exercises that enable independent action such as playing scales with both hands then introducing timing changes such as you play the right hand note twice for every once of the left
 
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Same here, I am in the learning stage, earlier I used to play one of my friend's piano. Now I am having my own.
 
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Hi Mark,
Welcome to the forums.
Many new people lately have introduced themselves and then just disappeared. I have a feeling about you that you will stick around.
I also play PSR type keyboard with ACMP.
Is that your intention too?
You mentioned learning hand coordination.
Playing left hand chords or bass or both? Playing right hand melody would be a lot different than stumming too. I am not a guitar player, but I know a few people who are, and manage the change . . hand coordination okay.
I play my music from sheets. Many have guitar tabs printed above the treble cleff. You can adapt these tabs to your right hand no worries with ACMP.
Good luck. Enjoy the challenge. Ask many questions.
Ray
Hi Ray,
Ultimately I would like to play both: chords with left & melody/leads with the right as well as chords with right & bass notes/melody with left. When I took guitar lessons as a kid I learned to sight read but I've lost that skill since most of the situations I've been in did not require it. I do have a good grasp on theory though so we'll see how it goes. That bass clef looks intimidating to me!!! I'll worry more about that later though as for now I've got to get these hands to do the basic stuff.
Mark
 
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It does not matter what you are playing, its the playing that matters.

You have a PSR, so you have an arranger and using the ACMP feature will get you going pretty quickly.

Chords with left hand and melody line with right hand will get you playing recognisable songs.

Meanwhile look up exercises that enable independent action such as playing scales with both hands then introducing timing changes such as you play the right hand note twice for every once of the left
Yup, right now it's just hand coordination type exercises walking up and down the C scale and using different patterns as I go. I do it with right then left then both. I'm also starting to get my hands used to playing some basic chords. I haven't even thought about the ACMP yet but that's a great idea for when I'm ready. I honestly thought that being a guitar player my hand coordination would be better than this but it's a struggle just starting out. I actually have to play the doe-ray-me stuff kind of slow to make it smooth and hit the right notes at the same volume. Once I get a better handle on this I'd like to maybe try to learn some of the easier Beatles songs.
 
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As a guitar player your hands are co-ordinated with each other.

That’s the rub as the saying goes.

Even after a good few years transitioning from guitar to keys I still struggle, so keep at it and develop your own practice routine and stick to it only modifying is ad you have measurable improvement.
 
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As a guitar player your hands are co-ordinated with each other.

That’s the rub as the saying goes.

Even after a good few years transitioning from guitar to keys I still struggle, so keep at it and develop your own practice routine and stick to it only modifying is ad you have measurable improvement.
Ha ha... yeah, they're coordinated on guitar but my keyboard skills are laughable.

So here's a question, am I hurting myself (not physically) by practicing on a non-weighted keyboard? I keep seeing comments saying to make sure you get a weighted keyboard but I've never heard anyone actually say why. FYI, I do want to be able to play piano but I see myself playing more synth and organ at some point. Not sure how all of that factors in.
 
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Its like asking which is better a Gibson LP or a Fender Strat/Tele, there is no real definitive you must have …..

When you can take a trip to a Music Store and have a play of everything and you will find a vast difference in feel of the various keybeds.

Hammer actions vary considerably, the goal of manufacturers is to emulate the action of a specific acoustic grand, but which one varies and differences come to the fore. Hammer actions allow more nuances in the play, more precision and a more dynamic performance specifically for piano related pieces of music.

If I just concentrate on lower priced digital pianos like a Korg B2 or D1, a Roland FP30X, a Yamaha P125, Kawai ES110, Casio S1000 or a PX then even in these higher end beginner digital pianos ($800 or less) there is a vast difference in keybed feel yet all are capable of expressive play, but some more so than others.

I started with synth action, moved to hammer action and now I have something different again in a semi-weighted keyboard and this suits me best of all.

Even synth actions vary, some are more suitable for one style than another and some have aftertouch, take a Roland FA the 61 keybed is supposed to be dire, the 76 key version is a joy to play, its a pity it is a 10 year old design.

So what I am leading up to is keep doing what you are doing then at some stage add an 88 key keyboard to your kit and right now I would say the one that offers best bang for the bucks is a Roland Juno DS, piano, ep, synth, organ in one keyboard.
 
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