how many years did you lean the 12 scales


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Hello everybody! So I was wondering how many years or month (for several ppl) you learned the 12 scales, until you master them. I've been learning for years, but I haven't got them just right. Share with me, if you will. Thanks.
 
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I suppose you mean the Major scales... I haven't really learned them inside-out yet, but I know them good enough to just have to repeat them quickly before attempting to play them in a song.

I didn't really take all too long, if you practice them regularly, you will probably learn them all in a few months, probably even better than I know them.

I've only been in need of knowing the scales for about one or two years, and I've never really practiced them for real, and yet I feel that I know them pretty well.

Problem is, that the major scales are faaar from all the scales :p. After learning the major scales, you need to learn the minor scales. There are tons of other scales out there as well, but those are probably the most important, the rest is just fun to know :)
 
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Hey, thanks for sharing. Yeah, I mean the major scales, and the minor scales as well. After learning both, I found that they have similar patterns in terms of the right fingering, like C major with A minor, and E major with C-sharp minor, and so on. Don't you think?
So, other than the two scales, are there other scales for Jazz tunes, for example?
I know I've been learning these so long coz I started when I was 21, so I guess my brain had been stuffed with many things, hence couldn't focus enough when forced to learn the scales off the piano, if you know what I mean. :)
 
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I don't really know what scales that are common in Jazz, but I would say that the blues scales might be good to learn after learning the major and minor scales, as they're used in quite a lot more than just blues ;)

For the "similar scales"-question, that's also a good thing to learn, that if you know a Major scale (say D major), and you jump down a minor 3rd (to B), then you will have the relative minor scale. Which means that D major and B minor is the same scale.

Of course you can do that in the opposite direction as well, if you know a minor scale (let's take D as example again), and you jump UP a minor 3rd (to F), you will have the F major scale.

This might come in handy when learning the minor scales after you've learned the major ones, so instead of having to learn the scales all over again, you can just easily check which major scale it's identical to, and then you know which notes to play :)
 
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yes, exactly, that's what I figured out when learning the major and minor scales. And I think, the B major scale and E major scale are the easiest in term of fingering among other scales. The hardest one I think is G-sharp major scale.
As for the blues scales, I will see if I can learn them later on. Thanks for the advice.
 
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When I first started playing, I was rather useless at scales - every time I played one I invented a new fingering for it! I've just started learning them again, and it definitely improves my general playing!

The shear number of scales is mind-boggling! Major, melodic and harmonic minors, all the Modes, blues, pentatonic and that's before you get to the more obscure ones! Enough to keep anyone busy...
 
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Hey Sam, I got some music theory ebooks, but I don't know if I'm allowed to share.
 
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When I first started playing, I was rather useless at scales - every time I played one I invented a new fingering for it! I've just started learning them again, and it definitely improves my general playing!

The shear number of scales is mind-boggling! Major, melodic and harmonic minors, all the Modes, blues, pentatonic and that's before you get to the more obscure ones! Enough to keep anyone busy...
yeah, I don't know how much time it would take me to get them all done. lol. But I won't complain. I'm all dedicated to music. :)

Hey Sam, I got some music theory ebooks, but I don't know if I'm allowed to share.
I allow it, completely. :D please do so. But if you concern about the eligibility to share it in the forum, considering the stipulation determined by the admin, then I must say that I have a similar doubt. But hopely it's all right.
 
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Never learned them and probably will never learn them until I get lessons either on the forum or in real life :D
 
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yes, exactly, that's what I figured out when learning the major and minor scales. And I think, the B major scale and E major scale are the easiest in term of fingering among other scales. The hardest one I think is G-sharp major scale.
As for the blues scales, I will see if I can learn them later on. Thanks for the advice.
I can at least give you a short briefing on how the blues scales work. They consist of 6 notes:

The root, the minor third, the fourth, the flatted fifth, the fifth and the flatted seventh.

So, the C blues scale would be: C Eb F Gb G Bb

The good thing with the blues scale is that it does most of the job for you, just walking the scale up and down sounds pretty good, unlike the major and minor scales. Try it out :)
 
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Hey, thanks again! I really appreciate it. I'll try it out, right away, and I will learn on different notes.
 
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So I have another question:
As I figured that major and minor scales have similar pattern in case of fingering, I want to confirm something. I don't have to change my fingering on those two scales at all, right, for example; C major and A minor? I mean I can use the same fingering (thumb, index, middle and so on) on C major scales as on A minor scales, right?
I haven't got into any piano course, so I need to ask this. :)
 
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Well, there are exceptions of course, which often occurs if one of the scales start on a white key, and the other one on a black, like F minor and G# Major, you can't really use the same fingering for those too, if you just walk one octave.

With C major and A minor, that method works, but I really doubt that it's reliable as a "rule". Do note, though, that there is no real "correct" fingering for each scale, you use the one that you feel most comfortable with. If you can't find a fingering that's comfortable (that can be a bit hard sometimes, actually), you can use those fingerings more like a guide-line.
 
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OK, let me explain something...

There are three minor scales: Natural, melodic and harmonic

The natural minor scale is constructed like the major scale:

C major
C D E F G A B C
w w h w w w h

A natural minor scale (Aeolian mode)
A B C D E F G A
w h w w w h w

w= Whole step
h=Half step

You can get the natural minor scale by starting in the sixth note of the major scale, and you can get the major scale by starting in the third note of the minor scale.

As you can see the wwhwwwh pattern is the same, but now the tonic note will be the sixth note.

The harmonic minor scale is the same has the natural minor scale, JUST with an augmented seven, for example:

A natural minor:
A B C D E F G A

A harmonic minor:
A B C D E F G# A

And the melodic minor scale has two modes, the ascending melodic and the descending melodic. For example:

A ascending melodic minor:
A B C D E F# G# A

A descending melodic minor:
A B C D E F G A

The descending melodic minor and the natural minor are the same, and the ascending melodic minor is like the major mode, BUT with a minor third.
I remember seing a pattern using these two last scales in my Beyer piano method. If you want it tell me so I can upload it.

Oh, if you have a doubt read this wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minor_mode , or download and read the books I uploaded
https://www.keyboardforums.com/showthread.php?t=1399
 
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Okay guys, thanks so much for the explanation. It helps a lot! :)
And Dr. Clock. I have downloaded the books. Thanks again.
 

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