Is there any site which show chord name by highlighting keys


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I learned lot of piano songs through video tutorials on youtube. Most of the youtubers do not mention chord name, they just show keys to press. I know basic Major and Minor chords but I do not know inversions and other scales. I do not want to spend much time in learning chords rather I prefer to memorize chords while they are being played in a song. So is there any software or app which may show the name of chord by highlighting combination of keys. Or anyother better suggestion for chords.
 
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I do not want to spend much time in learning chords rather I prefer to memorize chords while they are being played in a song. So is there any software or app which may show the name of chord by highlighting combination of keys. Or anyother better suggestion for chords.
Since you invited "better suggestion(s)":

Can I encourage you to think differently about this? Learning chords is not a cost of time, it's an investment in your future ability to learn and enjoy a range of songs, maybe even write your own.

Regular and consistent practice will get you there more quickly than you think. Once it's locked in, it's locked in.
 
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Since you invited "better suggestion(s)":

Can I encourage you to think differently about this? Learning chords is not a cost of time, it's an investment in your future ability to learn and enjoy a range of songs, maybe even write your own.

Regular and consistent practice will get you there more quickly than you think. Once it's locked in, it's locked in.
Any good resource for learning chords then?
 

Rayblewit

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Any good resource for learning chords then?
You could study the theory and understand the makeup of chords. You would play them from instinct of knowing how they are formed. There is an abundance of resources on line or book form.
But you said you wanted to just learn them and memorize them. That is the way I did it. Theory is just too complicated at my old age.
So what I did was I learnt each chord one at a time at the rate of about 3 or 4 each week for a few months. The common ones soon became a natural knowhow and the fingers just automatically find their spot. After a few months I would just learn one new chord every week being the not so common ones.
So if it is just memory you want and not theory, try this . .
Go into google search engine and type in a chord. Say Dm for instance. Type in "Dm piano chord"
You will get your answer showing the 3 keys you need to play and you can also vary them for inversions.
Do this for every chord you want to learn. They are all there at google. Take your time. Just do a few a week and practise.
Enjoy the challenge.
Cheers Ray.
 
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What Ray says is in fact that he has done what we all have in that we have developed Muscle Memory, the finger shapes for say a Major chord are the same you just move the whole hand up and down the keyboard to play in a specific key.

Try this play a C Major chord, which is C E G, now look at the number of unplayed notes (white and black) that are between C & E and between E & G, the number of unplayed notes stays the same for any other Major chord, so play a G Major, G B D and again count unplayed notes. It is that easy to learn chords.

Then comes chord inversions which once learned will be of great benefit since they provide economy of movement in your playing.

Learning chords groups, Major, Minor, Seventh to start with will get you going and you will be able to play along with thousands of songs.

Look online at 1 4 5 chord progressions in songs.

There are thousands if songs that can be played using chord progressions but the 1 4 5 applies primarily to Pop songs but do note that there are other chord progressions, it is part of the fun of learning to play to learn and learning chords by name is a great way to start. For if you do not know what a C chord is and the song you want to play is in a different key, what then?
 
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You could study the theory and understand the makeup of chords. You would play them from instinct of knowing how they are formed. There is an abundance of resources on line or book form.
But you said you wanted to just learn them and memorize them. That is the way I did it. Theory is just too complicated at my old age.
So what I did was I learnt each chord one at a time at the rate of about 3 or 4 each week for a few months. The common ones soon became a natural knowhow and the fingers just automatically find their spot. After a few months I would just learn one new chord every week being the not so common ones.
So if it is just memory you want and not theory, try this . .
Go into google search engine and type in a chord. Say Dm for instance. Type in "Dm piano chord"
You will get your answer showing the 3 keys you need to play and you can also vary them for inversions.
Do this for every chord you want to learn. They are all there at google. Take your time. Just do a few a week and practise.
Enjoy the challenge.
Cheers Ray.

As I said that I Know n have memorized basic major and minor chords. Those I found were with PSR manual

1440
 
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Few of the chords for the instance like
1441


1442


Now how to identify these....?
 

SeaGtGruff

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The first looks like Bb-Eb-F; is that correct? If so, I think it’s a Bbsus4, or Bb suspended 4th. A normal Bb Major chord would be Bb-D-F, which are the 1-3-5 degrees of the Bb Major scale. A suspended 4th chord just moves the middle note up from the 3rd degree to the 4th degree, or from the M3 (Major 3rd) to the P4 (Perfect 4th).

It could also be called an A#sus4, since A# and Bb are the same notes in 12TET (12-Tone Equal Temperament). But I think the preferred name of a scale usually goes with whichever name would give the scale the fewest number of sharps or flats. The Bb Major scale has two flats, Bb and Eb. The A# Major scale has 4 sharps and 3 double-sharps! So that means Bb Major is by far the simpler choice. :)

The second looks like Eb-G-Bb; is that correct? If so, it’s a standard Eb Major chord.

It could also be called a D# Major chord; but again, I think the preferred name would be Eb Major— especially if it occurs in the same piece of music as the first chord, since the key signature presumably contains flats, not sharps.
 
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if you have your Split active then you should have your display indicate what Chord you are playing in your left hand.

Can I suggest to you that when fingering a chord you use all fingers so if on your left hand your thumb is 1 and little finger 5 then using fingers 1 3 5 will be far better for you long term. Try using fingers 1 3 5 of left hand to play any Major Chord, it should feel so much easier with less stretch.
 
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The first looks like Bb-Eb-F; is that correct? If so, I think it’s a Bbsus4, or Bb suspended 4th. A normal Bb Major chord would be Bb-D-F, which are the 1-3-5 degrees of the Bb Major scale. A suspended 4th chord just moves the middle note up from the 3rd degree to the 4th degree, or from the M3 (Major 3rd) to the P4 (Perfect 4th).

It could also be called an A#sus4, since A# and Bb are the same notes in 12TET (12-Tone Equal Temperament). But I think the preferred name of a scale usually goes with whichever name would give the scale the fewest number of sharps or flats. The Bb Major scale has two flats, Bb and Eb. The A# Major scale has 4 sharps and 3 double-sharps! So that means Bb Major is by far the simpler choice. :)

The second looks like Eb-G-Bb; is that correct? If so, it’s a standard Eb Major chord.

It could also be called a D# Major chord; but again, I think the preferred name would be Eb Major— especially if it occurs in the same piece of music as the first chord, since the key signature presumably contains flats, not sharps.
SeaGtGruff your music knowledge is really mind-blowing. I salute you!
can you please provide a chart which covers essential piano chords for playing pop songs English/Indian. Secondly, please link some informative site where it explains the different chord nature like the one u explained for the suspended 4th. It's now drilled down in my memory for sure. But the good thing would be to first know which chords are important for Pop Music then even you can list the difference.
 

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SeaGtGruff

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Based on the chord chart you had posted, it looks like you have a Yamaha PSR-E363, PSR-EW300, or YPT-360?

Yamaha used to include more complete chord charts in their owners manuals, but it seems that some time ago they decided to move the more complete chord charts out of the owners manuals and into the song books. Unfortunately, it also seems that they decided not to put that information in the song book for the PSR-E363. :(

Attached is a PDF document with some pages that I copied out of two different Yamaha documents. I think the first page is from the Song Book for the PSR-E463 or a similar model. The other three pages are from the Owners Manual for the PSR-E403. They show all, or at least most, of the many chord types which are recognized by Yamaha auto accompaniments.
 

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Based on the chord chart you had posted, it looks like you have a Yamaha PSR-E363, PSR-EW300, or YPT-360?

Yamaha used to include more complete chord charts in their owners manuals, but it seems that some time ago they decided to move the more complete chord charts out of the owners manuals and into the song books. Unfortunately, it also seems that they decided not to put that information in the song book for the PSR-E363. :(

Attached is a PDF document with some pages that I copied out of two different Yamaha documents. I think the first page is from the Song Book for the PSR-E463 or a similar model. The other three pages are from the Owners Manual for the PSR-E403. They show all, or at least most, of the many chord types which are recognized by Yamaha auto accompaniments.
This all is really hard to digest. I asked abt pop song chords. Are these all crucial to learn? n yes I am using PSR E363
Sorry if I am tiring all here. I really appreciate Biggles, happyrat1 and specially SeaGtGruff
 

SeaGtGruff

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You aren't tiring me at all. :)

Yes, those are a lot of chord types, and I doubt you'll need to use more than a fraction of them outside of classical music or jazz.

For pop music, I'd guess that the main chord types to know are the major, minor, seventh, major seventh, and minor seventh chords.

You might encounter an occasional "oddball" chord type beyond those five, in which case you can refer to that document to see if you can figure out what it's called.

If you want to start learning a variety of chord types in advance, I'd recommend starting with three-note chord types first, and move on to four-note chord types only after you've understood the three-note chord types-- with the possible exception of the seventh, major seventh, and minor seventh chords.
 
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Pop songs - In a nutshell.
Thousands can be played with only three chords. These are known as 1 4 5 songs eg if
1=C
2=D
3=E
4=F
5=G
6=A
7=B

So a song in the key C uses C F &G. For another key inset the Key as 1 then fill in the remainder so in the key of F the three chords are F B & C

Variations are played using the 2 chord and the 3, 4, 6 & 7 or whatever suits but the variations are often Minor or Diminished chords as follows
1=Major
2=Minor
3=Minor
4=Major
5=Major
6=Minor
7=Diminished

Now for Blues the chord progression can be 1 4 1 5 1

Classic Rock 1 7b 4

So learning Major Minor, Diminished, to start then add 7th and 6th will give you a fair number of songs to play along with.

There you go time to practice with the keyboard split off.

Left hand, Bass notes Root of key + octave, right hand chord play a bar of 1 in quarter time then a bar of 4 and a bar of 5 then another bar of 1, repeat.

Then swap over and use left hand chords which you can then develop and use the Arranger features of your keyboard
 

SeaGtGruff

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As @Biggles mentioned in an earlier post, you can also use the keyboard to find out what chord you're playing-- but it's with ACMP turned on, not SPLIT. While ACMP is on, play the chord you're curious about in the left hand or accompaniment area (to the left of the Split Point). Then the keyboard should display an abbreviated chord name. This will also cause an accompaniment to play, so you can leave ACMP turned off while you're playing a song with both hands, then temporarily switch on ACMP when you want to identify a particular chord.
 
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4B4036B0-E83C-4646-BBBD-B91655C4AC39.jpeg


Whilst I have be rabbeting on about Chord Progressions take a look at this which someone shared on a Fb Music Group.
 
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As @Biggles mentioned in an earlier post, you can also use the keyboard to find out what chord you're playing-- but it's with ACMP turned on, not SPLIT. While ACMP is on, play the chord you're curious about in the left hand or accompaniment area (to the left of the Split Point). Then the keyboard should display an abbreviated chord name. This will also cause an accompaniment to play, so you can leave ACMP turned off while you're playing a song with both hands, then temporarily switch on ACMP when you want to identify a particular chord.
thank you, thank you very much, really if u would not be on the other side of screen, I would have given u a hug. At morning I checked split feature n I was disappointed n thought my E363 doesn't support chord name displaying. Hats off for u SeaGtGruff
 
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