Is there such a thing as a keyboard for small hands?


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I believe my hands are small
I have a Casio CTK1300ES and I barely reach the octave with my thumb and pinky, for example If y have to press A and the next A, sometimes I hit the adjacent G or B.
I turns out really hard to play octaves fast.

So I wanted to know if there are keyboards with thinner keys so they (the keys) are more compact, and I could reach the octave comfortably

???

PD: I am 22 years old, so my hands are not going to grow much
 
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It's not really an answer to your question (because I don't know the answer), but did you know that with regular practice you can stretch your hands, which will make those octaves more comfortable to play?

For example, my left hand can span about half an inch wider than my right, purely because of playing all those octaves in the left hand over the years.
 
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Alfonso -
I have the same size hands. I think that can be an advantage. Adapt, improvise, practice - the size of your fingers doesn't matter. Heck, I can BARLEY stretch my fingers an octave but can still boogie woogie with the best of them.

I really dislike the small keys. They just don't work for me.

Here's a video of me doing a couple solos with my small hands (posted this here a while back). Hopefully this will help to inspire you :)

Best of luck to you -
Jim
 

SeaGtGruff

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Yes, there are keyboards with smaller keys.

In years past it was possible to find a 61-key keyboard with mini keys-- e.g., the Yamaha PSS-680. There were also other models with 49 keys, 44 keys, etc.

Today most all of the smaller-key keyboards seem to be 25-key MIDI controllers or synths. However, the new remake of the ARP Odyssey has thinner keys than normal-- i.e., in contrast to keyboards with "mini" or "micro" keys, it has keys that are (as I understand it) the same length as full-sized keys but a little bit thinner.
 

happyrat1

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I believe my hands are small
I have a Casio CTK1300ES and I barely reach the octave with my thumb and pinky, for example If y have to press A and the next A, sometimes I hit the adjacent G or B.
I turns out really hard to play octaves fast.

So I wanted to know if there are keyboards with thinner keys so they (the keys) are more compact, and I could reach the octave comfortably

???

PD: I am 22 years old, so my hands are not going to grow much

I have small hands also and sometimes have to play a Yamaha DGX-505 at church but don't really enjoy it because, although it has 88-keys, they are slightly smaller than standard and it definitely takes me a few minutes to get used to the different spacing of the keys. At first glance it looks like it has full size keys but I recently measured the keybed and found that the total distance from the outside edge of the bottom key to the outside edge of the top key was just over one and a quarter inches less than on a regular acoustic piano. Another digital piano (Korg) had standard size keys and measured the same as the acoustic.

I don't know if this slight difference would be enough to make it easier for you to play but it might be worth checking out some of the DGX models. I certainly would not recommend using mini keys except for maybe step sequencing etc.

Hope this helps.
 

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