Keyboard for adult who is keyboard challenged...


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I am 71 and had a piano lesson here and there, not too adept but would like to restart my learning. I've been used to the treble clef only, having played wind instruments so my left hand and chords need lots of work.

Here are my criteria for a keyboard:

1. Good realistic sounds for what it does
2. Velocity keys (vary volume)
3. User friendly controls/settings
4. Minimum of 48 polyphony
5. The best possible lesson/teaching aids; easiest to learn and use
6. Good useful selection of built in songs
7. Less than $300
8. Fun.

61 keys will be perfectly adequate for my needs. I have no intention of playing an acoustic piano. I like the concept of integrated teaching aids. I have no intention of taking lessons from a live teacher. I've taken music theory classes back in the day. I've played treble clef instruments for 15 years. I intend to use headphones or audio out (or headphones out) to an Outlaw amp and Definitive speakers with separate sub.

It would also be helpful to know is which brand generally has the better teaching/learning capabilities, Casio or Yamaha?


I never intend to be performance-ready, but would like a good amount of flexibility with rhythms, riffs, arpeggios, good variety of instrument sounds, etc. High priorities are ease of use and good sound.

I understand there are trade offs and compromises.

Whadoyathink?

PS: I viewed the sticky on choosing a keyboard. My Malwarebytes did not allow a download of these files. Wouldn't allow an "exclusion" either.
HTTP link
http://harmony.comeze.com/Keyboard_Guide.zip

RS link
http://rapidshare.com/files/415206844/Keyboard_Guide.zip.html
 
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happyrat1

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For your budget and specifications I'd recommend the Casio CTK-6200.

https://www.amazon.com/Casio-CTK6200-PPK-Closed-Cup-Headphones/dp/B00JZEW92Y/

Casio keyboards generally offer better value per dollar than comparable Yamaha models.

It meets all your criteria except for teaching aids which are something you'd have to find from third party sources anyway. It does display played notes on a scale display while playing but reality is there's no substitute for sitting down with a good book on music theory and finding a good tutor.

Here's a few books I'd also recommend.

https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Reading-Music-Step-Step/dp/1593373244/

https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Music-Theory-Book-Understanding/dp/1593376529/

https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Piano-Book-CD-classical/dp/1598699768/

Gary ;)
 
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Agree with Happyrat, Casio are better than Yamaha.

Yamaha manuals are poor and the screens which display the inbuilt lessons are so small as to be totally useless.

As for teaching, you will struggle to find any books as good as Kenneth Baker’s The Complete Keyboard Player Omnibus Edition (which is 3 books in one).

Online tutorials vary considerably, but as a starter check out pianogenius,com where some free video tutorials are available, the guy that does the tutorials is the keyboard player in Rick Springfields band. Karen Ramiraz is also pretty good, plus if you search for Korg Video Manuals for the new PA700 (well above your price ceiling) then if you look at the first few it will provide you with a reasonable amount of info which will help you in learning about the specifics of Keyboards.

I have my iPad connected to my keyboard so that I can feed in the audio from any video tutorial I am viewing so I can hear it on the headphone I wear when practising and playing along with so this is a handly function to have.
 
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happyrat1

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For tutorials I'd suggest reading this thread.

https://www.keyboardforums.com/threads/good-tutorial-links.24556/

Especially take a look at the programs Synthesia and Pianobooster. They work with any MIDI keyboard.

http://www.synthesiagame.com/

http://pianobooster.sourceforge.net/

Otherwise I don't know what you mean by teaching aids unless you are referring to lighted key keyboards. General consensus is that they are a gimmick that don't really work or teach anything and generally speaking those keyboards have the lowest quality sounds of all the Yamaha and Casio models.

If you really feel you need to be guided Note By Note then take a look at Pianomaestro which also works with any MIDI enabled keyboard.

http://www.thepianomaestro.com/

Gary ;)
 

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