Keyboard vs Piano

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by sid, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. sid

    sid

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hey guys,
    I'm new here. I'm interested in learning piano/keyboard. what do you would be appropriate for me to learn if i want to gig/make my own music? i have heard that pianist tend to be rigid and can't improvise and can't play beyond the sheet music. and that they can't improvise. is that true? i want to sing songs and play keyboard/piano as accompaniment. so which should i learn piano or keyboard?
     
    sid, Apr 23, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. sid

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    5,131
    Likes Received:
    1,698
    Location:
    GTA, Canada
    Almost everyone takes a different path to accomplish what you want to do.

    It's great to have goals but you have to make certain they are realistic goals.

    First off, what's your budget? How much free time do you have and how dedicated are you and how much of that time are you willing and able to spend working on music?

    What type of music are you most interested in? Pop and Rock? Country and Folk? Hip Hop and Rap? Classical?

    Answer all of these questions and maybe we can give you some constructive advice on getting started.

    First off though, you should find yourself a decent teacher to give you at least the basics of music theory and teach you proper posture and finger exercises so you don't start out with any bad habits.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Apr 23, 2017
    #2
    johnny196775 likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. sid

    sid

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    thank you Gary for taking the time to reply. as for your question regarding the genre i like, it's mainly pop and rock and some blues. as for my budget, i've got that covered. i have a decent instrument and a teacher waiting to take me under his wing. thanks again.
     
    sid, Apr 23, 2017
    #3
  4. sid

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    5,131
    Likes Received:
    1,698
    Location:
    GTA, Canada
    It sounds to me then that you've taken all the right steps.

    From here on in it's just "practice practice PRACTICE!!!"

    Blood, sweat and tears will get you there just fine :)

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Apr 23, 2017
    #4
    Becky, CowboyNQ and Rayblewit like this.
  5. sid

    Rayblewit Love Music / Love Life

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    701
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Not true.
    Do you see Elton John or Billy Joel with sheet music? Have you ever seen Peter Allen? How's this for improvising?


    Good luck with your final choice and just expanding on what Gary already said . . Dedication and perseverance are necessary attributes.
    Love music / love life -ray
     
    Rayblewit, Apr 23, 2017
    #5
  6. sid

    Fred Coulter Collector of ancient keyboards

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2016
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    421
    Location:
    Central Florida
    What you learn and how your play is affected far more by your teacher than what instrument you've got in front of you. If the instrument is used in jazz, then it can be improvised on. There are lots of jazz pianists out there.

    IF you live in Great Britain, you might want to look for a teacher who supports the jazz curriculum of the ABRSM (www.abrsm.org). That's one way to improvise on a piano. If you've got money -- LOTS OF MONEY -- you might want to look at Berklee Online for courses and certificates in jazz, although you probably should know how to play first.

    But the instrument is far less important for improvisation than your mindset.

    Be that as it may, you probably still want to know what keyboard to buy. And THAT'S a difficult question to answer. Keyboards fall in several categories.

    Pianos: These keyboards include both acoustic pianos as well as electric instruments with 88 weighted keys and internal speakers that create a decent piano sound.

    Synthesizers: These keyboards can have keyboards of almost any size, but are primarily oriented towards creating and producing new sounds.

    ROMplers: These keyboards can have keyboards of almost any size, but primarily create sounds by playing back recordings of existing sounds.

    Workstations: These keyboards can have keyboards of almost any size, but are primarily known for being able to play multiple sounds simultaneously, usually with an internal multi-track MIDI recorder.

    Arrangers: These keyboards have keyboards of either 61 or 73 keys. They are primarily known for the ability to perform a live accompaniment to your music. Your left hand determines the chord, while your right hand plays the melody.

    Keyboards can fit into multiple categories. My Kronos is a synthesizer and a ROMpler and a Workstation. (It records and plays both MIDI and audio on sixteen tracks for each.) My Tyros is a ROMpler, a Workstation, and an Arranger. On the other hand, my upright piano is just a piano.

    IF you want to play traditional "classical" piano as well as rock and roll, etc., I strongly recommend getting something with weighted keys to learn on. There are snotty music teachers who will insist on you having an 88 note one, but unless you really want that teacher, I'd recommend looking elsewhere. On the other hand, it's generally difficult to get a good weighted keyboard with only sixty one keys.

    In terms of budget, you can get a new decent electric piano for a couple hundred dollars, or you can get a grand piano with over a hundred keys imported from Australia for about a quarter of a million. All the price points in between are also available. Generally, new electronic keyboards will top off around five thousand, although if you look hard you can probably go higher. The bottom is in the several hundred range. In general, you get what you pay for, but the increase in price is not linear, it's exponential. An instrument twice as good may cost four times as much. Or more. Near the top of the price range, the difference between instruments may be insignificant.

    As a beginner, you don't need to worry about the top end. You DO need to consider what you want the keyboard to do. (So far, no one has made an instrument that you can plug directly into your brain. Yet.)

    This is just brushing the surface. If you have more questions (and you probably will), feel free to ask. We'll all give your our two cents worth, and occasionally we'll even agree. (If we don't, remember that I'm right and they're not.)
     
    Fred Coulter, Apr 23, 2017
    #6
    Becky, happyrat1 and Rayblewit like this.
  7. sid

    CowboyNQ

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2014
    Messages:
    911
    Likes Received:
    604
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    The ability to improvise or not is 0% about the instrument of choice and 100% about the musician.

    Good luck, hope it goes well for you!
     
    CowboyNQ, Apr 23, 2017
    #7
    Becky, happyrat1 and Rayblewit like this.
  8. sid

    sid

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    thank you all for your replies, suggestions and inputs. it was great hearing different opinions. i'll consult with my teacher(he teaches both piano and keyboard) and see what happens.
     
    sid, Apr 24, 2017
    #8
    happyrat1 and CowboyNQ like this.
  9. sid

    Becky Administrator

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    388
    Some great advice in this thread :)

    Welcome to the forum @sid!
     
    Becky, Apr 24, 2017
    #9
    CowboyNQ and happyrat1 like this.
  10. sid

    sid

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    thanks Becky
     
    sid, Apr 24, 2017
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Similar Threads
  1. KidFromBastion

    CTK 6000 vs 6200 - price and differences

    KidFromBastion, Jul 29, 2016, in forum: Casio Keyboards
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    769
    happyrat1
    Jul 29, 2016
  2. BryanM

    Yamaha vs Roland vs Korg

    BryanM, Sep 6, 2016, in forum: General Keyboard Discussion
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    1,763
    PennyFer
    Sep 20, 2016
  3. sothye

    Yamaha PSR 550 vs Casio CTK 6200

    sothye, Oct 27, 2016, in forum: General Keyboard Discussion
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    549
    sothye
    Oct 27, 2016
  4. sothye

    Keyboard recommendation : PSR-550 vs CTK-6000

    sothye, Oct 27, 2016, in forum: Keyboard Purchase Recommendations
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    417
    Fred Coulter
    Oct 28, 2016
  5. Rio

    Please help to select Keyboard: Yamaha PSR-S650 vs PSR-EW400

    Rio, Dec 25, 2016, in forum: Keyboard Purchase Recommendations
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    491
  6. simchaleh

    semi weighted(fsx) vs weighted keys, for piano expressive playing.

    simchaleh, Jan 18, 2017, in forum: Keyboard Purchase Recommendations
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    341
    simchaleh
    Jan 18, 2017
  7. dpmusicfan1

    New at NAMM?? Kurzweil Forte vs Nord Stage 2 EX vs Roland RD2000

    dpmusicfan1, Jan 19, 2017, in forum: Keyboard Purchase Recommendations
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,250
    delaware dave
    Jan 22, 2017
  8. Axel
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    385
Loading...