Korg M1 Buttons


EdK

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Hello all,

Does anyone have any buttons for the Korg M1? The buttons I'm looking for are those used in the number pad and the control pad (Combi, Prog, Gloral, Seq, etc). These are the plastic buttons....NOT the tactile switches under them.
The buttons come in groups of 2 and 4.

Parts Is Parts is the company that Korg relagates it's spare parts to when their keyboards are no longer manufactured an considered vintage but they are out of them. Same goes for Syntaur. The only place I can find a couple of the buttons is on eBay. Two of them are used and the other is NOS (New Old Stock) and in the UK.

Thanks....Ed
 
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EdK

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Thanks Gary.

I'm thinking of doing that (ebay) however they only have the 4 button group. Looking for the 2 button group specifically.

These buttons were also used on the T Series, Prophecy and I believe "X" Series also.

I replaced all of mine about 10 years ago when Parts Is Parts still had them.

Hopefully others in this forum will read this thread. Maybe I'll get lucky.

A collegue suggested I look into possibly having new ones made with 3D printing. Interesting idea for sure.
I've heard of 3D printing but never gave it much thought. If I had to guess, it sounds like it might be expensive.

Ed
 

EdK

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Hi Gary,

I received a couple quotes for having new buttons 3D printed. I bit more expensive than I thought it would be. The scanning/modeling step is in the $400-$500 range. That's before they are actually 3D printed. I'm waiting to get a 'ballpark' quote of what that would cost. But I'm afraid it might not be worth investing unless there is a demand for the buttons. I have no idea how many people still use the M1 and have a need for this part. Individual used buttons can be found on eBay in the $30-$40 price range and those that are listed have been on there for quite some time so I'm suspecting there isn't much demand for them or perhaps the price is keeping people away from them. Parts-is-Parts used to sell them for $10 but everywhere I've looked, everyone is out of stock.
 

Fred Coulter

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This sounds like a business model. The main cost with 3D printing is the initial setup. Once a company has created a part once, then printing a second is just a matter of reloading the file and printing it again.

Obviously you can't run a store printing just one switch. But as more and more parts disappear, the inventory of print as needed parts would grow.

And all this is related to a thought I had yesterday. There are hobbyist pipe organ makers. They build the keyboards, pedals, pipes, air switching, etc. The only thing they don't build is the actual air pump, although they do build the air pressure regulating bellows. I wonder how long it will be before 3D printed organ plans are available. (The problem is the printing of the pipes. I'm not sure if inexpensive 3D printers can extrude long items like 8' and 16' pipes. Yet.) Probably it would start off with small 1' portative organs. But long term?
 

EdK

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This sounds like a business model. The main cost with 3D printing is the initial setup. Once a company has created a part once, then printing a second is just a matter of reloading the file and printing it again.

Obviously you can't run a store printing just one switch. But as more and more parts disappear, the inventory of print as needed parts would grow.

And all this is related to a thought I had yesterday. There are hobbyist pipe organ makers. They build the keyboards, pedals, pipes, air switching, etc. The only thing they don't build is the actual air pump, although they do build the air pressure regulating bellows. I wonder how long it will be before 3D printed organ plans are available. (The problem is the printing of the pipes. I'm not sure if inexpensive 3D printers can extrude long items like 8' and 16' pipes. Yet.) Probably it would start off with small 1' portative organs. But long term?
 

EdK

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Hi Fred,

You're right about the business model. Can't do that on one or just a small handfull of parts. Reaching out to potential customers is quite an undertaking as well.

As for your comment on pipe organs, I'm actually a church organist. Grew up on pipe organs and actually helped a friend build one in his home. Aside from common components that are used in every organ, there are many 'one of a kind' parts that make each of them unique. Especially the pipes. There's such a wide variety of materials used (wood, zinc, tin, brass, etc) that producing them via 3D printing I believe would be cost prohibitive as each note is not simply a matter of making it a differen size.. Individual pipes perhaps to replace missing or damaged beyond repair...maybe...but it would have to probably be a historic instrument to justify the cost. The sound of every pipe organ is unique.as there are a lot of factors that are taken into account to make it what it is. I strongly suspect that pipes will continue to be made by hand.
 
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EdK

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Oh yes...and numerous other forums. Every parts supplier that were suggested I already knew about and they are all out of stock. The only place they can be found is on eBay (used stock) but I'm conituing to to search.

I'm thinking if I can reasonably expect about 500 buyers, it would be worthwhile to have them 3D printed.
To replace all the buttons on the M1, it would require 5 (4 button groups) and 1 (2 button group).

The tactile switches that are activated by pressing the buttons are pretty easily found. If those are in good condition, then the buttons will last a long time but I discovered that as the tactile switches get older, they are more difficult to push to activate the circuit and as a result, the user (as I do) tend to push the buttons harder in order to activate the switch which then causes the buttons to break.
 

happyrat1

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Have you considered the "hammer and duct tape" solution?

ie, try repairing the buttons with epoxy and a metal insert filling to hold them together?

Gary ;)
 

EdK

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Have you considered the "hammer and duct tape" solution?

ie, try repairing the buttons with epoxy and a metal insert filling to hold them together?

Gary ;)
No...but an interesting idea.
 

happyrat1

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Or for that matter howabout using the original buttons to create a latex mold and casting a new set of buttons with an appropriate resin?

Gary ;)
 

happyrat1

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Maybe these will give you some ideas.




Gary ;)
 
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happyrat1

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BTW, just a shot in the dark here but perhaps consult with a jeweller for some custom made buttons.

Those guys should have all sorts of ideas of how to custom fabricate a set for way less than $400.

Gary ;)
 
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EdK

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Thanks Gary.. I'll definitely look into the resin and urethane and a jeweler.

The buttons are translucent and pretty intricate. I suppose it wouldn't hurt to try.

Thanks for the ideas. Here's a pic of what the buttons look like.
M1 Buttons Group 4.jpg
M1 Buttons Group 2.jpg
 

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