MIDI problem in Casio CTK-750


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Hello,

it's my first time here so sorry if it's wrong place for this topic.

I have Casio music keyboard model CTK-750, since several years. I bought USB-MIDI cable and I have a big problem because my PC and programs detect cable, but music keyboard don't sent signals. Before I'll say "cable is broken" I'd like to know how to set correctly options on my music keyboard.

Can you help me? I'm not Englishman so manual is too difficult for me.

Greetings!
 
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What daw or software are you using? Sometimes the problem isn't in the keyboard but in the software.
 

happyrat1

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Make sure it's plugged in correctly. MIDI IN connects to MIDI OUT and vice versa.

It's very counter intuitive.

Gary ;)
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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When dealing with USB cables, and MIDI-to-USB cables, one thing you might need to check on if you're having trouble is that you aren't using a USB 3.0 port on your computer, because that might cause a problem. I've never experienced this myself, but the first time I heard about it was when it came up in another forum. A user had connected his keyboard to an audio interface via MIDI cable, then connected the audio interface to his computer via USB cable, and his DAW and other audio software were able to detect that there was a USB device available, but they couldn't detect any of the MIDI data that was being transmitted to the computer. Several people in the forum gave him a variety of different suggestions to try out, but nothing helped. Finally he contacted the Customer Support for the audio interface and the support rep spent a good deal of time with him to resolve the issue. It turned out he'd been connecting the audio interface to a USB 3.0 port on his computer, and that was the whole problem. As soon as he tried connecting the audio interface to a USB 2.0 port, his DAW and other software were able to detect the MIDI data.

Then again, some of the "dirt cheap" MIDI-to-USB cables which are sold over the internet are poorly made and unreliable, so that might be it, too.
 

k10

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Interesting there were problems using USB 3. Supposed to be backward compliant – evidently not.

USB3 can normally be identified by the colour of the plastic inside the connector. Blue = USB3.

Most USB to MIDI adapters are just protocol convertors and are Class Compliant under Windows (no driver required).

However, the following steps will give you the best chance of success on a Windows machine;

1) If the device came with a driver – read those instructions (not these!) It probably wants you to install the driver BEFORE connecting the USB>MIDI convertor.

2) Do not start the software on your PC (that will use the MIDI) yet.

3) Do not connect the MIDI to the music device yet.

4) Log on to your PC using an Administrators account.

5) Connect the USB to your PC after it has finished booting/logging in.

6) Watch to see if your PC requests a driver – if it does, install the driver.

7) You may have to wait a while for 5 to complete – depending on the number of free internet games installed on your PC J

8) Start your MIDI software on the PC and confirm it can see the MIDI port (not the music device, thats not connected yet)

9) Follow the instructions with your Music Device for connecting your Midi cables

The Midi In connected to Out can seem odd.

So think of the PC playing your Music device.

Midi flows (OUT) from the (USB to Midi adapter) PC and (IN) to the Music device.

From a tecchie point of view, separate IN/OUT sockets are great. The alternative is leads that cross over TX/RX connections (when joining two devices) and are straight through (when extending leads). The number of folk who messed that up in the serial world was alarming. The separate socket approach means only one type of lead (although redundancy may be involved) – if it fits without the use of a hammer then its most likely correct.

Anyone think a ‘loop back’ test kit would sell? Two sockets to plug your leads into and a very small piece of software to give an instant indication of all Midi ports found and how reliably they are working? Do people do this anyway and just use existing software on their PC to send and receive the data (as a test)?

A test kit could have an LED to indicate TX and software to test the hardware at full bandwidth. How many of these exist?

I've got a few of those dirt cheap midi convertors (and some expensive ones). It seemed to be that any convertor under £40 was a £3 convertor. You can pay more for a junk one or proper money for a branded solution. Three of the four I bought worked - not a good recommendation. They must be really cheap/problematic though as the supplier sent me two when one failed.
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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My guess is that the USB3 compatibility issue must be related to data transmission speed, but that might be more of a WAG than a SWAG. And it might be more of a software problem than a hardware problem. MIDI data is traditionally transmitted at a particular speed (or range of tolerable speeds?), so presumably that's the speed that the driver is expecting and anything else could cause the data to be garbled and unintelligible to the driver or other software. Although it's now technically possible to have faster MIDI data transmission speeds, I assume the driver needs to be able to handle those faster speeds. Anyway, that's the theory that makes sense to me, hence it's likely utter nonsense!

Regarding the installation of device drivers, you definitely need to follow the instructions given with the device. Case in point:

About a year ago I bought a used YPT-400 keyboard that seemed to be incompatible with the Yamaha USB-MIDI driver I'd already installed for my PSR-E433 and PSR-E443 keyboards-- the YPT-400 wouldn't show up as an available MIDI device, only as a USB device that (according to the computer) didn't have the correct driver installed. None of the older Yamaha USB-MIDI drivers would work on my computer due to compatibility issues with the 64-bit Windows OS, so I just gave up and resigned myself to having to use the YPT-400 with my iPad 2 (because, unlike Windows, it doesn't need a driver).

A few months ago I decided to try again. I uninstalled the current driver for my OS, then reinstalled it-- and it worked! Woohoo, now I could use my YPT-400 with my computer! Except all of a sudden my PSR-E433 and PSR-E443 would no longer work with the driver. It seems the YPT-400 identifies itself to the computer as a "Yamaha PortaTone," but the PSR-E433 and PSR-E443 both identify themselves as a "Digital Keyboard." So I uninstalled the driver again, connected my PSR-E433 and YPT-400 to the computer at the same time, then reinstalled the driver. Now all three keyboards work with the driver! When I got the YPT-400 I hadn't realized that reinstalling the driver would be necessary, since I hadn't needed to do that when I got my PSR-E443 (because the driver already knew what a "Digital Keyboard" was from when I'd installed it for my PSR-E433).
 
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Hi there,
In my case it's always been one of the following:

1) The driver has not been installed properly/successfully.
2) The driver has been installed on the computer, but then later on the keyboard is being connected to a different USB port than the original one. In some cases, you would need to install the driver again if you want to use a different driver.
3) Or you hit the maximum number of devices that can be installed under the O.S. . If I remember correctly it's like 12 devices or something like that for Windows 8.1.
 

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