plz help me to understand these signs


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plse hel me to understand these mark an arrow facing left side then quaver note then= again quaver note then an arrow facing right side ???? please help
1449
 
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SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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I've never seen that (the arrows) before, but the partial triplet indicator over the first eighth note makes me think that the comment is intended to help the reader interpret how long a triplet of notes is supposed to take.

So my guess is that it means something along the lines of "a triplet of eighth notes or smaller corresponds to an eighth note or larger," if that makes sense.

Can you provide a picture of some measures which contain triplets?
 
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This is a bagpipe song with multiple time signature and tempo changes.

The notation you have circled is a little out of context as Michael has already indicated, but I’m guessing it occurs at one of these changes.

I’m reasonably confident It’s telling you that the tempo of an eighth note from this point onward should be played at the same tempo as the eighth note triplets previously indicated (which we can’t see in your excerpt).
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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Ah, that makes sense. I'm not familiar with the composition and didn't realize that there are any time signature changes in it, but your explanation sounds spot-on. In other words, each measure of the new section presumably still takes up the same amount of time as each measure of the prior section, which I guess was written using a 4/4 time signature.
 
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Yeah quite possibly Michael. It’s a little hard to be certain without seeing the whole score and time signatures can be sometimes be allocated somewhat arbitrarily when pieces are transcribed in retrospect. I’m not familiar with the tune either and don’t want to wake the house up which is why I’m hedging a little.

If you Google the piece you’ll see multiple written interpretations, some with bars containing the incorrect number of notes, some with complex grace note indications, some with bars of 2/4, 3/4, 6/8 scattered throughout.

While I wasn’t able to find the specific sheet music in OPs excerpt, when I’ve seen the highlighted device of using notes on either side of an “equals” symbol before, it’s been used to help the reader with tempo and/or time signature changes. Which makes perfect sense in this case given the timing subtleties of this song.
 
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