Power supplies for live gigs


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I play three keyboards live - Korg Kronos 2 76, Yamaha MoxF6, Roland Juno Gi - along with a few other items such as an Alesis IO dock II, Presonus headphone amplifier, Kenton midi thru box. All of these have many ways of being powered - nice chunky kettle lead on the Korg but others have more flimsy mains adapters with highly breakable mains leads. At the moment, they all plug into a large extension block but, due to several lead breakages over the years, I am always concerned that the flimsy adapters could break - I do carry spares but it would be much better if I could come up with a sturdier solution. I cant imagine for one minute that keyboard players doing major tours would be happy with these highly breakable adapters, so has anyone got any idea at all how they would make this into a far more long-lasting solution? Can one buy the 9v or 12v adapters with stronger leads attached, and if so where?
 
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happyrat1

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Sorry Alan.

I think you're out of luck.

If you knew a good electrical engineering technologist you could possibly build a custom power supply unit for all your gear with plug in leads for each unit.

But the cost would probably be prohibitive and if you made additions or substitutions to your gear in the future you'd be stuck back where you started.

The reality of the situation is that manufacturers make cost cutting decisions along the way when they design and implement new hardware and if they can save $20 per unit by moving the power supply off the main board and slap a wall wart to power it they will inevitably do so.

Frankly you're just going to have to live with the arrangement you already have but you could reduce the risk of cable clutter by using a few zip ties to bundle all the cables into a single strand and carefully label the outputs on each to avoid confusion when hooking up.

That's the best advice I can give.

Gary ;)
 
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I agree with Gary, basically all you can do is be careful. That's why internal power supplies with IEC cables are such a pro for a lot of people.

One option, if you are doing a lot of setting up and tearing down, is to do what Gary suggested and cable tie everything. I've seen a lot of people that cable tie their power strips, their bricks, etc all on to the keyboard stand. So when they are setting up it is just a matter of putting the keyboard on and plugging them in, to reduce time and handling of all the cables.
 
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I must admit Alan I tour extensively and just put up with the power supply bricks, although I don't love them either.

I have two golden rules:

1. Make sure the lead is holding ZERO tension. The suggestions from the boys above of gaffer taping or cable tying the power supply brick to the keyboard stand are good ones, I also know guys who velcro theirs to the keyboard itself. I do neither, but just make sure that the brick is close enough to the keyboard that no tension held on the lead.

2. Carry a spare power supply at all times.

I'm also very organised and have all my cables and power supplies nicely packed away in gig bags - cables properly wrapped and protected, which helps increase longevity and decrease set up time.

Good luck!
 
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I can understand keyboard manufacturers having brick power supplies, it is the flimsy lead and small sized plug and socket connector into the keyboard that does not make sense.

Take a leaf out of your guitarist and their cable managed pedal board. Fit the bricks to a board and as Cowboy advises keep the low voltage leads slack.
 
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Probably a little late on the reply BUT.... Take an old laptop power supply..... Then, whatever voltages you need, buy the little 3 lead voltage regulators (I get mine from China at about a quarter apiece... probably locally your still looking at under a dollar). Do note the AMP's on the chips (I think mine are 5 amp maximum, and thats with a heat sink) So... you need a 9v, ok 0v voltage reg chip, oh, and a 12 volt, ok, add a 12 v chip, In fact, I'd have TWO of every voltage you use (these things do fail). Your "weak link" is then the laptop supply... but think... how many laptops have died, and how many power supplies you have in a box somewhere.
Heres a quick "primer"..
https://electronicsforu.com/resources/learn-electronics/7805-ic-voltage-regulator
 
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