PSR-E360 single finger chord problem


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Hi everyone, I am new to the forum and new to keyboard playing. At the moment I am learning songs using right hand chords with single finger bass chords. I understand how the basic single fingers work but can’t find out how to play 7ths, minors, # m and so on. I have been on to Yamaha London but they could not help. I have also looked on the internet but been unable to find help there either. Is there a chart available to show how to work the 1/2 finger bass chord system? I am glad to be on board and look forward to any replies. Dick,
 
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Rayblewit

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BTW . . Take some time to learn fingered chords rather than single finger chords. You will benefit it later as you develop more skillful playing. As well you can adapt the chords to inversions allowing more flexibility and fluency.
You can download or buy chord charts. . Search the web or visit a music store.
Just do it! Scap the single finger method.
Good Luck.
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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Welcome to the forums, @Dick!

See page 27 of the PSR-E360 Owner's Manual, particularly the square labelled "Easy Chords."

For major chords, press 1 key-- whichever key is the root of the chord (C, C#, D, Eb, etc.).

For minor chords, press 2 keys-- the root of the chord, plus the first black key to its left. For example, to play a C# minor chord you would press the Bb and C# keys at the same time; or, to play a B minor chord you would press the Bb and B keys at the same time.

For seventh chords, press 2 keys-- the root of the chord, plus the first white key to its left. For example, to play a C# 7th chord you would press the C and C# keys at the same time; or, to play a B 7th chord you would press the A and B keys at the same time.

For minor seventh chords, press 3 keys-- the root of the chord, plus the first black key and the first white key to its left. For example, to play a C# minor 7th chord you would press the Bb, C, and C# keys at the same time; or, to play a B minor 7th chord you would press the A, Bb, and B keys at the same time.

Although the "easy chords" are handy to use, it's actually better to learn how to play chords using full fingering, where you press all or most of the keys that form the desired chords. I say "all or most" because oftentimes you can omit one or more keys from the chord and the keyboard will still be able to correctly recognize the chord-- but only certain keys can be omitted from certain chords, otherwise the keyboard won't recognize the chord correctly.

I have a PDF document of some pages from Yamaha manuals showing the 35 types of chords that Yamaha styles can recognize, but I'm not able to attach it from my iPad, so I'll attach it later today from my desktop.
 
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Thanks for the reply which will be very helpful. The manual I got with the keyboard only has 21 pages?
 
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BTW . . Take some time to learn fingered chords rather than single finger chords. You will benefit it later as you develop more skillful playing. As well you can adapt the chords to inversions allowing more flexibility and fluency.
You can download or buy chord charts. . Search the web or visit a music store.
Just do it! Scap the single finger method.
Good Luck.
Thanks for the reply. I will give them a try.
 
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SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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