PSR E463 Drum kits.

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Depends upon the context on what you want to do some more information from yourself will help tailor specific advice.
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Yamaha Global have a Youtube channel which is limited in what is included but they do have a series on the lesser E series which should be very similar to your E463 although you should find them useful.

 
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Biggles, I am at a a total loss as to what the drum kits can do, so hard to describe context.
Ed
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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You can just select one of the drum kits as though it were any other voice, and the Data List has a key-by-key list of each sound in the kit-- although many of the names might be abbreviated. There are also little pictures printed on the panel just above each key to give you an idea of what sounds are where. The pictures go with the Standard Drum Kit, so some of them might not match the sounds in some of the additional drum kits-- especially the more exotic ones, like the Chinese or Indian kits-- but most kits just have alternate sounds for the standard drums and cymbals, so the pictures should still match up fairly well.

If you want to record your own drum beats to play along with, rather than just using one of the styles, you can pick a drum kit and record yourself playing it, just like you'd record yourself playing a tune. If you're not used to playing with a drum kit then you'll probably need to hunt around on the keys first to find the sounds that you want to use, and then practice hitting those keys in rhythm to create your beats. Most of the time you can just use two or three keys to play a kick drum and a snare or two, then add a cymbal crash every so often.

The song recorder lets you record five separate tracks-- plus a sixth accompaniment track-- so you can even build up your drum beats a track at a time, such as recording a steady kick drum beat on track 1, then adding a snare beat on track 2, then adding a different snare on track 3, cymbals on track 4, etc. You can even select a different drum kit for each track. When you're done, you can save the recording to a MIDI file so it can be loaded into a DAW for further work.
 
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You can just select one of the drum kits as though it were any other voice, and the Data List has a key-by-key list of each sound in the kit-- although many of the names might be abbreviated. There are also little pictures printed on the panel just above each key to give you an idea of what sounds are where. The pictures go with the Standard Drum Kit, so some of them might not match the sounds in some of the additional drum kits-- especially the more exotic ones, like the Chinese or Indian kits-- but most kits just have alternate sounds for the standard drums and cymbals, so the pictures should still match up fairly well.

If you want to record your own drum beats to play along with, rather than just using one of the styles, you can pick a drum kit and record yourself playing it, just like you'd record yourself playing a tune. If you're not used to playing with a drum kit then you'll probably need to hunt around on the keys first to find the sounds that you want to use, and then practice hitting those keys in rhythm to create your beats. Most of the time you can just use two or three keys to play a kick drum and a snare or two, then add a cymbal crash every so often.

The song recorder lets you record five separate tracks-- plus a sixth accompaniment track-- so you can even build up your drum beats a track at a time, such as recording a steady kick drum beat on track 1, then adding a snare beat on track 2, then adding a different snare on track 3, cymbals on track 4, etc. You can even select a different drum kit for each track. When you're done, you can save the recording to a MIDI file so it can be loaded into a DAW for further work.
Ok...let's say I record a bass drum rhythm on my track 1 and a Hat rhythm on my track 2.. How do I combine both together on the keyboard... I hope you get me.. How do I combine track 1 and track 2 such that they sound as one track..
 

SeaGtGruff

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I'm not sure what you mean by "combine" them, so I'll try to answer this from different angles.

There's no way to merge two tracks together into a single track on the keyboard. In fact, I don't think you would be able to do that in a DAW, either-- at least, not easily, since each channel will need its own Program Change values and other voice-related settings, so to merge the data for two channels into one they'd either need to share the same settings, or you'd need to try to quickly change those settings each time you want to play a note or sequence of notes using one or the other voices.

The first situation is doable if you want to merge two tracks or channels that use the same voices and other settings, such as where the right-hand part of a piano piece is on one track and the left-hand part is on another track. And the second situation can be used in a pinch when you need to use more than 16 voices in a song, but the way it's normally done is to have a channel be used for one voice during a given portion of the song, then use it for a different voice (after executing the appropriate messages to change voices) in a different portion of the song, as long as the two voices don't need to be used at the same time. But in any case, I don't think you'd be able to accomplish those things on the keyboard itself because its built-in song recorder isn't sophisticated enough; you'd need to use a DAW or other MIDI editor.

On the other hand, a MIDI "track" can contain more than just one MIDI channel. The keyboard's built-in song recorder lets you record two voices at once on a single track-- the Main Voice and the Dual Voice. So you could set those to two different voices-- presumably, in this case, two different drum kits-- and record them to a single track. But the catch is that you can't "split" the Main and Dual voices across different sections of the keyboard-- and you can't record the actual Split Voice, either-- so you'd be recording the two voices as they play the same notes as each other, layered together sonically.

However, if you're using a DAW to put your tracks together, you can record each channel (or voice) separately and merge them into a multi-channel track. Or you could record the Split Voice in addition to the Main Voice, such that you could use two voices at the same time to play their own separate notes (rather than layered together to play the same notes) and record them at the same time.

But if you're just trying to create a User Song to use as a "backing track" that you're going to play along with, you don't really need to merge the tracks together at all, because the keyboard will play the tracks together anyway. Even though you'll need to record the tracks separately, you'll be able to hear the already-recorded tracks being played back by the keyboard as you're recording another track to "combine" with them. So you record one track, then record a second track while listening to the first one play back, then record a third track while listening to the first two play back, etc. To be sure, I mean you're hearing the other tracks being played back while the keyboard is in "record" mode, not in "play back" mode. Just follow the instructions in the manual about how to record on a specific track.

If you're trying to create a "tight" drum backing this way using two or more different drum kits, it's probably going to be pretty challenging to play and record just the beats that use one kit, then play and record just the beats that use another kit (while listening to the first ones playing back), then play and record just the beats that use a third kit, etc. But it might be easier if you record the basic rhythm first, like the bass drum playing on the main down beats or up beats, then record more beats with a second kit, etc.

It would still be easier to do all of this in a DAW, because you could either use the DAW's built-in virtual drum pad (if it has one), or a plug-in, or a physical controller, and assign selected notes (percussion sounds) from different drum kits to each of the pads, which would let you play and record them at the same time instead of needing to record them separately.

Also, if you record a lot of separate tracks in a DAW, you can mix them down to a single stereo audio track, then play that final audio track back through the keyboard's speakers as you play along. In other words, you don't have to do everything in MIDI; you can make an audio backing track instead, although you'd need to play it back on a smartphone, tablet, etc., and play the audio through the keyboard's speakers. Note that some keyboard models can play back audio files, but I'm assuming that you're talking about using a PSR-E model, which can't play back audio files itself.
 
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I'm not sure what you mean by "combine" them, so I'll try to answer this from different angles.

There's no way to merge two tracks together into a single track on the keyboard. In fact, I don't think you would be able to do that in a DAW, either-- at least, not easily, since each channel will need its own Program Change values and other voice-related settings, so to merge the data for two channels into one they'd either need to share the same settings, or you'd need to try to quickly change those settings each time you want to play a note or sequence of notes using one or the other voices.

The first situation is doable if you want to merge two tracks or channels that use the same voices and other settings, such as where the right-hand part of a piano piece is on one track and the left-hand part is on another track. And the second situation can be used in a pinch when you need to use more than 16 voices in a song, but the way it's normally done is to have a channel be used for one voice during a given portion of the song, then use it for a different voice (after executing the appropriate messages to change voices) in a different portion of the song, as long as the two voices don't need to be used at the same time. But in any case, I don't think you'd be able to accomplish those things on the keyboard itself because its built-in song recorder isn't sophisticated enough; you'd need to use a DAW or other MIDI editor.

On the other hand, a MIDI "track" can contain more than just one MIDI channel. The keyboard's built-in song recorder lets you record two voices at once on a single track-- the Main Voice and the Dual Voice. So you could set those to two different voices-- presumably, in this case, two different drum kits-- and record them to a single track. But the catch is that you can't "split" the Main and Dual voices across different sections of the keyboard-- and you can't record the actual Split Voice, either-- so you'd be recording the two voices as they play the same notes as each other, layered together sonically.

However, if you're using a DAW to put your tracks together, you can record each channel (or voice) separately and merge them into a multi-channel track. Or you could record the Split Voice in addition to the Main Voice, such that you could use two voices at the same time to play their own separate notes (rather than layered together to play the same notes) and record them at the same time.

But if you're just trying to create a User Song to use as a "backing track" that you're going to play along with, you don't really need to merge the tracks together at all, because the keyboard will play the tracks together anyway. Even though you'll need to record the tracks separately, you'll be able to hear the already-recorded tracks being played back by the keyboard as you're recording another track to "combine" with them. So you record one track, then record a second track while listening to the first one play back, then record a third track while listening to the first two play back, etc. To be sure, I mean you're hearing the other tracks being played back while the keyboard is in "record" mode, not in "play back" mode. Just follow the instructions in the manual about how to record on a specific track.

If you're trying to create a "tight" drum backing this way using two or more different drum kits, it's probably going to be pretty challenging to play and record just the beats that use one kit, then play and record just the beats that use another kit (while listening to the first ones playing back), then play and record just the beats that use a third kit, etc. But it might be easier if you record the basic rhythm first, like the bass drum playing on the main down beats or up beats, then record more beats with a second kit, etc.

It would still be easier to do all of this in a DAW, because you could either use the DAW's built-in virtual drum pad (if it has one), or a plug-in, or a physical controller, and assign selected notes (percussion sounds) from different drum kits to each of the pads, which would let you play and record them at the same time instead of needing to record them separately.

Also, if you record a lot of separate tracks in a DAW, you can mix them down to a single stereo audio track, then play that final audio track back through the keyboard's speakers as you play along. In other words, you don't have to do everything in MIDI; you can make an audio backing track instead, although you'd need to play it back on a smartphone, tablet, etc., and play the audio through the keyboard's speakers. Note that some keyboard models can play back audio files, but I'm assuming that you're talking about using a PSR-E model, which can't play back audio files itself.
God bless you a lot for this write-up...
More ink to your pen...
You have sufficiently answered my questions with no flaw...

However I guess DAW means Digital Audio Workstation... Can u recommened one for me...
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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The one I generally prefer for its ease of use is Acoustica Mixcraft, but (1) it isn't free, (2) it's only available for Windows, and (3) it doesn't support SysEx messages. Of course, (1) most commercial DAWs aren't free although some do have free "lite" editions, (2) Windows might be the OS you use, and (3) some of the most popular modern commercial DAWs don't support SysEx messages.

You can download, install, and "test drive" many commercial DAWs for free before you decide to buy them, or you can use their free "lite" version to see if it's adequate to your needs and upgrade to a paid version if you like the "lite" version but it's missing some capabilities or features from a paid version that you need.

If you're on Windows, Anvil Studio is a smaller DAW (meaning not from a big company) that is completely free for its core engine, then it has paid expansions which add more functionality if you need them, allowing you to buy just the features you need.

Tracktion is another DAW that uses a different pricing system than most, because its latest version must be purchased, whereas the version before that is available as "bundled" software with some audio or MIDI equipment, and the version before that is available for free for anyone-- so the free version isn't some "lite" version with reduced functionalities and features, merely an older version that used to require a purchase and that simply doesn't have any changes from the two newer versions. It's available for the three main OSes-- Windows, Mac, and Linux-- and it also happens to support SysEx. It doesn't usually come with a lot of plugins (virtual instruments and effects) unless you buy them-- but you can add your own selection of third-party plugins, many of which are available for free; just search for "free plugins" or "free VSTs."

PreSonus Studio One is a popular DAW that's available for the three main OSes, and it has a free "lite" version that might meet your needs. It doesn't support SysEx, the free version doesn't support third-party plugins, and its requirements for adding and configuring external MIDI devices can seem a bit weird if you aren't used to it, but once you've got the hang of setting up your device(s) it's pretty easy to use.

Steinberg Cubase has been around for many, many years and is very popular with a lot of users, although some people don't like the fact that most of its editions require a security dongle. However, the Cubase Elements version does not require a dongle-- although it does require the use of a free software license manager-- and it can be used for a free trial period. It's available for the three major OSes and supports SysEx.

Cakewalk by Bandlab is a free DAW that used to require purchase when it was owned by other companies (it changed hands a few times), but its current owner has made it available for free.

Cockos REAPER is another DAW that's available for the three main OSes and that supports SysEx. It isn't free, but its free trial never expires and its license is very affordable as DAWs go. It doesn't include a lot of virtual instrument plugins, but you can add your own third-party plugins. Cockos also makes a free MIDI plugin that can be used as a third-party plugin with other companies' DAWs, which can add support for SysEx messages (at least, when they're used within the plugin) if the other DAWs don't support SysEx themselves. REAPER is very popular with people in the "home recording" scene, possibly because the full version (which is also its only version) can be used for free forever, as long as your guilty conscience doesn't bother you-- but as I said, its license is extremely affordable.

There are many other DAWs out there, but those are some of the ones I have some familiarity with and that come to mind off the top of my head. Some others are Ableton Live, Bitwig Studios, Avid Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Reason, MAGIX ACID (a popular DAW that used to be Sony ACID), MAGIX Music Maker, etc.

When using any given DAW, its visual appeal, GUI, and menu organization can be very important in how well you respond to and understand it, and can determine whether you strongly like or dislike it, so it's a good idea to look at and try out a number of different DAWs before you decide which one you prefer. Of course, a DAW's actual capabilities and limitations are also important, so it's a good idea to put a DAW through the paces during its free trial period to see if you run up against any deficiencies that are a deal-breaker for you.
 

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