Recording a song using inbuilt style PSR-E 453


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How do I have the inbuilt styles or databases recorded in my tracks using PSR-E 453?
 
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SeaGtGruff

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Refer to the section called "Recording Your Performance" in the PSR-E453/PSR-EW400 Owner's Manual, which begins on page 32.

There are two ways that you can record a User Song-- by the "Quick Recording" method, or by the "Recording to a Specified Track" method.

Quick recording will automatically record the melody-- that is, the part you're playing on the keyboard-- along with the auto accompaniment if you're using one and have ACMP turned on. The melody will be recorded on Track 1, whereas the auto accompaniment will be recorded on Track 6 (or "Track A").

If you would prefer, you can record just the auto accompaniment parts by recording to Track 6/A using the second recording method. This can be trickier, since it might be a bit challenging to play the chord changes by themselves without also playing the melody to help you keep track of where you are in the song. But if you can do it this way, the advantage is that you can then turn off ACMP and record the melody to Track 1 (also with the second method) using both hands and the entire width of the keyboard.

Now, if you instead prefer to record on your computer using a DAW, you can do that, too, but the keyboard won't transmit the style parts unless you tell it to. The way you do that is by going into the Function menu and turning on the "Style Out" function (see page 60).

If you are in fact recording with a DAW, you need to be sure to use the "Initial Send" function at the beginning of your recording-- that is, after you've started recording in the DAW, but before you've started to actually play. This will transmit all of the current system, voice, and effects settings for the keyboard so the DAW can capture them.
 
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Refer to the section called "Recording Your Performance" in the PSR-E453/PSR-EW400 Owner's Manual, which begins on page 32.

There are two ways that you can record a User Song-- by the "Quick Recording" method, or by the "Recording to a Specified Track" method.

Quick recording will automatically record the melody-- that is, the part you're playing on the keyboard-- along with the auto accompaniment if you're using one and have ACMP turned on. The melody will be recorded on Track 1, whereas the auto accompaniment will be recorded on Track 6 (or "Track A").

If you would prefer, you can record just the auto accompaniment parts by recording to Track 6/A using the second recording method. This can be trickier, since it might be a bit challenging to play the chord changes by themselves without also playing the melody to help you keep track of where you are in the song. But if you can do it this way, the advantage is that you can then turn off ACMP and record the melody to Track 1 (also with the second method) using both hands and the entire width of the keyboard.

Now, if you instead prefer to record on your computer using a DAW, you can do that, too, but the keyboard won't transmit the style parts unless you tell it to. The way you do that is by going into the Function menu and turning on the "Style Out" function (see page 60).

If you are in fact recording with a DAW, you need to be sure to use the "Initial Send" function at the beginning of your recording-- that is, after you've started recording in the DAW, but before you've started to actually play. This will transmit all of the current system, voice, and effects settings for the keyboard so the DAW can capture them.
I have PSR E363 keyboard and it also offers intial send. I never have used it and never knew abt it's function.
So sir SeaGtGruff after hitting the recording button in DAW, we need to use initial send then it will assign all voices to all tracks in DAW. is that what you mean sir? I will really appreciate for detail explaination or link to tutorial for it's proper use
 

SeaGtGruff

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That's a good question, so I'll try to give a good answer. Take a deep breath and prepare yourself for The Dreaded Wall of Text! ;)

"Initial Send" transmits MIDI information about how the keyboard is set up-- which Reverb Type and Chorus Type are selected, and other "system" settings (that is, settings that affect the keyboard as a whole), plus which voices are selected for the MIDI channels that will be transmitted, and other "channel" settings (that is, settings that are specific to the individual channels).

As far as which MIDI channels will be transmitted, that depends on three settings that control which parts you would like to transmit-- "Keyboard Out," "Style Out," and "Song Out." Note that some PSR-E models don't have these three individual functions in their menus, but instead have a "PC Mode" function that lets you choose between a few specific preset configurations, so check your Owner's Manual for more information about what's available on your particular model.

Let's back up for a minute and consider how-- or rather, when-- the keyboard transmits MIDI data. Normally, it will transmit MIDI data (if configured to do so; see the preceding paragraph) in a "live" fashion, meaning whenever you play on the keys, use certain panel controls, or select a given voice or style or song. For instance, if you select a voice that you want to play with, the keyboard will transmit the Bank Select and Program Change values for that voice, along with the MIDI data for any other settings that are preprogrammed to be used for that voice-- that is, the voice presets. However, those settings will be transmitted only if they're different than whatever the old settings were before you selected the voice.

To give a couple of examples, suppose you're using a voice that's hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 100 and a Reverb Depth of 10. You decide to select a different voice that's also hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 100 and a Reverb Depth of 10. As soon as you choose the new voice, the keyboard will transmit the Bank Select and Program Change for that voice, but it will not transmit the Channel Volume and Reverb Depth for the new voice because it didn't actually need to change those two settings for the new voice.

On the other hand, if you choose a new voice that's hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 80 and a Reverb Depth of 15, the keyboard will transmit the MIDI messages for the Channel Volume and Reverb Depth settings because it did need to change those two settings for the new voice.

Keeping that in mind, let's consider the normal order of events when you want to use a DAW to record yourself playing your keyboard:

First you set up the keyboard the way you want it to be-- that is, you choose the Reverb Type, Main Voice, Dual Voice (if desired), Split Voice (if desired), Style Number (if desired), Tempo, any voice-related parameters you want to change (Octave, Volume, Pan, Reverb Depth, etc.), and any other settings and features (such as Arpeggio) that you want to use.

Then you set up the DAW-- add the necessary MIDI track(s), select your keyboard as the input device, set the time signature and tempo for the project, set up anything else that you need to, and "arm" the track(s) for recording.

When you're ready to begin recording, you either start recording and then start playing, or you set up the DAW so it automatically begins recording as soon as you start to play. Either way, the recording will not capture any of the MIDI messages that got transmitted by the keyboard when you were initially setting it up, since they were transmitted before you ever started to record. Consequently, the notes that you play will get recorded to the track(s), but none of the information about which voice(s) to use, nor any of the other settings, will get recorded to the track(s).

Let's say you finish recording, then you make some editing changes to correct any mistakes you made-- wrong notes, bad timing, etc.-- and you save your project. Next, you decide to play it back to your keyboard to see how it sounds. What will probably happen is that all the notes you played will play back correctly, but they will be in the GM1 Acoustic Grand Piano voice (probably called XG Grand Piano on your Yamaha keyboard). "Wait a minute," you think, "why aren't the notes playing back with the voice(s) that I actually used? What did I do wrong, and how can I fix it?"

The problem is, the MIDI tracks you recorded contain none of the necessary information about which voices to use, so the DAW and the keyboard will default to using the GM1 standards. This means MIDI channels 1 through 9, and 11 through 16, will be played using the GM1 Acoustic Grand Piano voice (because there are no Program Change messages on those channels to indicate otherwise), whereas MIDI channel 10 will be played using the GM1 Standard Drum Kit (because the GM1 standard stipulates that channel 10 is for drums).

There are two different options for correcting this issue. The first option is normally used when you're composing your MIDI masterpiece on the computer-- within a DAW or notation software-- as opposed to playing your keyboard and recording it in your DAW. The second option is the better one to use when you're playing your keyboard and recording it in your DAW, although this can depend on whether you're planning to play back the recording to your keyboard or use the DAW's virtual instruments and plug-ins to generate the sounds.

The first option is to go into the track settings in the DAW and specify which Bank Number and Program Number you want the track to use, along with setting any other parameters which are available in the track settings. Note that the specific choice of track settings will largely depend on the MIDI output port or virtual instrument that you've told the track to use. For example, if you tell the DAW that you want the data in the MIDI track to be played back using a particular virtual instrument or plug-in, the options on the track itself will most likely be very limited because any detailed settings would normally be made within the virtual instrument or plug-in. But if you tell the DAW that you want the data in the MIDI track to be played back to your external keyboard instrument, the options on the track itself may include a wide selection of CC (or Controller Change) parameters in addition to the Bank Number and Program Number. So the idea is that the track itself contains only the necessary Note On/Off events, along with any other MIDI events that are to occur while the track is playing back (such as Pitch Bend events), and the DAW stores the information about which sounds to use along with all the other track settings (such as which MIDI output port or virtual instrument to use).

If you've recorded yourself playing the keyboard and want the DAW to use the exact same setup as you'd used when playing, it can be extremely tedious to have to set every single CC parameter within the track's settings-- assuming (1) that the DAW lets you make those settings within the track's setup panel, not to mention (2) that you actually know which CC parameters need to be set and what values they should be set to! So if you're recording yourself playing the keyboard and intend to play back the recording using the keyboard-- either by saving the recording as a MIDI file, transferring it to the keyboard, and playing back the file on the keyboard, or by playing back the recording within the DAW and sequencing (or transmitting) the MIDI to the keyboard-- then you probably want to use the second option, which is to tell the keyboard to transmit all of the MIDI data for its current setup to the DAW so you can record it at the beginning of the MIDI tracks, before you actually begin to play any notes on the keyboard. You just need to start the recording, then use the "Initial Send" function to transmit the keyboard's setup information to the DAW so it gets recorded, then begin playing what you want to record. This is a lot simpler than trying to set everything up manually within the track's settings.
 
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Refer to the section called "Recording Your Performance" in the PSR-E453/PSR-EW400 Owner's Manual, which begins on page 32.

There are two ways that you can record a User Song-- by the "Quick Recording" method, or by the "Recording to a Specified Track" method.

Quick recording will automatically record the melody-- that is, the part you're playing on the keyboard-- along with the auto accompaniment if you're using one and have ACMP turned on. The melody will be recorded on Track 1, whereas the auto accompaniment will be recorded on Track 6 (or "Track A").

If you would prefer, you can record just the auto accompaniment parts by recording to Track 6/A using the second recording method. This can be trickier, since it might be a bit challenging to play the chord changes by themselves without also playing the melody to help you keep track of where you are in the song. But if you can do it this way, the advantage is that you can then turn off ACMP and record the melody to Track 1 (also with the second method) using both hands and the entire width of the keyboard.

Now, if you instead prefer to record on your computer using a DAW, you can do that, too, but the keyboard won't transmit the style parts unless you tell it to. The way you do that is by going into the Function menu and turning on the "Style Out" function (see page 60).

If you are in fact recording with a DAW, you need to be sure to use the "Initial Send" function at the beginning of your recording-- that is, after you've started recording in the DAW, but before you've started to actually play. This will transmit all of the current system, voice, and effects settings for the keyboard so the DAW can capture them.
@SeaGtGruff Thanks so much. This is helpful.
 
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That's a good question, so I'll try to give a good answer. Take a deep breath and prepare yourself for The Dreaded Wall of Text! ;)

"Initial Send" transmits MIDI information about how the keyboard is set up-- which Reverb Type and Chorus Type are selected, and other "system" settings (that is, settings that affect the keyboard as a whole), plus which voices are selected for the MIDI channels that will be transmitted, and other "channel" settings (that is, settings that are specific to the individual channels).

As far as which MIDI channels will be transmitted, that depends on three settings that control which parts you would like to transmit-- "Keyboard Out," "Style Out," and "Song Out." Note that some PSR-E models don't have these three individual functions in their menus, but instead have a "PC Mode" function that lets you choose between a few specific preset configurations, so check your Owner's Manual for more information about what's available on your particular model.

Let's back up for a minute and consider how-- or rather, when-- the keyboard transmits MIDI data. Normally, it will transmit MIDI data (if configured to do so; see the preceding paragraph) in a "live" fashion, meaning whenever you play on the keys, use certain panel controls, or select a given voice or style or song. For instance, if you select a voice that you want to play with, the keyboard will transmit the Bank Select and Program Change values for that voice, along with the MIDI data for any other settings that are preprogrammed to be used for that voice-- that is, the voice presets. However, those settings will be transmitted only if they're different than whatever the old settings were before you selected the voice.

To give a couple of examples, suppose you're using a voice that's hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 100 and a Reverb Depth of 10. You decide to select a different voice that's also hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 100 and a Reverb Depth of 10. As soon as you choose the new voice, the keyboard will transmit the Bank Select and Program Change for that voice, but it will not transmit the Channel Volume and Reverb Depth for the new voice because it didn't actually need to change those two settings for the new voice.

On the other hand, if you choose a new voice that's hardcoded to use a Main Volume of 80 and a Reverb Depth of 15, the keyboard will transmit the MIDI messages for the Channel Volume and Reverb Depth settings because it did need to change those two settings for the new voice.

Keeping that in mind, let's consider the normal order of events when you want to use a DAW to record yourself playing your keyboard:

First you set up the keyboard the way you want it to be-- that is, you choose the Reverb Type, Main Voice, Dual Voice (if desired), Split Voice (if desired), Style Number (if desired), Tempo, any voice-related parameters you want to change (Octave, Volume, Pan, Reverb Depth, etc.), and any other settings and features (such as Arpeggio) that you want to use.

Then you set up the DAW-- add the necessary MIDI track(s), select your keyboard as the input device, set the time signature and tempo for the project, set up anything else that you need to, and "arm" the track(s) for recording.

When you're ready to begin recording, you either start recording and then start playing, or you set up the DAW so it automatically begins recording as soon as you start to play. Either way, the recording will not capture any of the MIDI messages that got transmitted by the keyboard when you were initially setting it up, since they were transmitted before you ever started to record. Consequently, the notes that you play will get recorded to the track(s), but none of the information about which voice(s) to use, nor any of the other settings, will get recorded to the track(s).

Let's say you finish recording, then you make some editing changes to correct any mistakes you made-- wrong notes, bad timing, etc.-- and you save your project. Next, you decide to play it back to your keyboard to see how it sounds. What will probably happen is that all the notes you played will play back correctly, but they will be in the GM1 Acoustic Grand Piano voice (probably called XG Grand Piano on your Yamaha keyboard). "Wait a minute," you think, "why aren't the notes playing back with the voice(s) that I actually used? What did I do wrong, and how can I fix it?"

The problem is, the MIDI tracks you recorded contain none of the necessary information about which voices to use, so the DAW and the keyboard will default to using the GM1 standards. This means MIDI channels 1 through 9, and 11 through 16, will be played using the GM1 Acoustic Grand Piano voice (because there are no Program Change messages on those channels to indicate otherwise), whereas MIDI channel 10 will be played using the GM1 Standard Drum Kit (because the GM1 standard stipulates that channel 10 is for drums).

There are two different options for correcting this issue. The first option is normally used when you're composing your MIDI masterpiece on the computer-- within a DAW or notation software-- as opposed to playing your keyboard and recording it in your DAW. The second option is the better one to use when you're playing your keyboard and recording it in your DAW, although this can depend on whether you're planning to play back the recording to your keyboard or use the DAW's virtual instruments and plug-ins to generate the sounds.

The first option is to go into the track settings in the DAW and specify which Bank Number and Program Number you want the track to use, along with setting any other parameters which are available in the track settings. Note that the specific choice of track settings will largely depend on the MIDI output port or virtual instrument that you've told the track to use. For example, if you tell the DAW that you want the data in the MIDI track to be played back using a particular virtual instrument or plug-in, the options on the track itself will most likely be very limited because any detailed settings would normally be made within the virtual instrument or plug-in. But if you tell the DAW that you want the data in the MIDI track to be played back to your external keyboard instrument, the options on the track itself may include a wide selection of CC (or Controller Change) parameters in addition to the Bank Number and Program Number. So the idea is that the track itself contains only the necessary Note On/Off events, along with any other MIDI events that are to occur while the track is playing back (such as Pitch Bend events), and the DAW stores the information about which sounds to use along with all the other track settings (such as which MIDI output port or virtual instrument to use).

If you've recorded yourself playing the keyboard and want the DAW to use the exact same setup as you'd used when playing, it can be extremely tedious to have to set every single CC parameter within the track's settings-- assuming (1) that the DAW lets you make those settings within the track's setup panel, not to mention (2) that you actually know which CC parameters need to be set and what values they should be set to! So if you're recording yourself playing the keyboard and intend to play back the recording using the keyboard-- either by saving the recording as a MIDI file, transferring it to the keyboard, and playing back the file on the keyboard, or by playing back the recording within the DAW and sequencing (or transmitting) the MIDI to the keyboard-- then you probably want to use the second option, which is to tell the keyboard to transmit all of the MIDI data for its current setup to the DAW so you can record it at the beginning of the MIDI tracks, before you actually begin to play any notes on the keyboard. You just need to start the recording, then use the "Initial Send" function to transmit the keyboard's setup information to the DAW so it gets recorded, then begin playing what you want to record. This is a lot simpler than trying to set everything up manually within the track's settings.
really thank you for detailed explaination and sorry for late reply. As I was busy on other thread regarding arpeggios. Actually, I now have two questions only:
first: sir Gruff as you said the second option suits us when we wanted playback midi file on external keyboard (PSR E363), so if I disconnect the instrument will I not be able to hear the recorded midi sequence in DAW as probably I won't be editing all while sitting there with keyboard

secondly
ultimately I have to export it in sound file. So will I be able to export it with desired sound or do I have tolive with midi sequence, it's really dumb question but I have doubts from the above discussion that it's not possible

and one more important thing to add here is that PSR E363 doesn't have capability to change voice of midi file. I tried once long time ago by placing midi file which appeared in song section but I was not able to change it's voice from default sound, so I doubt PSR 363 don't have such option. so will it effect the external sound playing from DAW on PSR E363?
 
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SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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If you disconnect the keyboard from the computer, you won't be able to hear the keyboard's sounds as you edit the MIDI data in the DAW, so you'll need to temporarily choose one or more virtual instruments for the sounds. Don't change the MIDI messages that select the keyboard's voices, or you'll have problems when you eventually transfer the MIDI file back to the keyboard.

Once you've finished working on the file in the DAW and have transferred it back to the keyboard, you can set up the DAW to record the keyboard's audio output, start recording on the audio tracks, and play back the song on the keyboard so you can record it. Then you can edit the audio recording if you wish, and then save it as an MP3 file if desired so you can listen to it on any device that can play MP3 files.

The PSR-E models don't let you change the voices in songs the way the PSR-S models do. However, some models have a function that lets you temporarily select a different voice for the song's main melody track (channel 1). To do this-- if your model has that feature-- select the song but don't start playing it yet. Select whichever voice you want the song to use. Then press and hold the VOICE button. See the section about changing the melody voice on page 28 of the Owner's Manual. Note that this doesn't work on User Songs, because they're stored in a special format. But it should work on the preset songs, as well as MIDI song files that you've transferred to the keyboard.
 
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If you disconnect the keyboard from the computer, you won't be able to hear the keyboard's sounds as you edit the MIDI data in the DAW, so you'll need to temporarily choose one or more virtual instruments for the sounds. Don't change the MIDI messages that select the keyboard's voices, or you'll have problems when you eventually transfer the MIDI file back to the keyboard.

Once you've finished working on the file in the DAW and have transferred it back to the keyboard, you can set up the DAW to record the keyboard's audio output, start recording on the audio tracks, and play back the song on the keyboard so you can record it. Then you can edit the audio recording if you wish, and then save it as an MP3 file if desired so you can listen to it on any device that can play MP3 files.

The PSR-E models don't let you change the voices in songs the way the PSR-S models do. However, some models have a function that lets you temporarily select a different voice for the song's main melody track (channel 1). To do this-- if your model has that feature-- select the song but don't start playing it yet. Select whichever voice you want the song to use. Then press and hold the VOICE button. See the section about changing the melody voice on page 28 of the Owner's Manual. Note that this doesn't work on User Songs, because they're stored in a special format. But it should work on the preset songs, as well as MIDI song files that you've transferred to the keyboard.
here what I found, so if I cannot play back midi file in my instrument then intial send (second option method) is not of any use. I really want to avail it, as it is lot simple and put the entire music making process to ease. Is there any way around, loosing hopes here :( ??

read the note at end
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SeaGtGruff

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I'm not sure we're talking about the same thing.

The option to change the voice that will be used to play the melody part (channel 1) of a preset song or MIDI song file is only useful if you have an existing song file and you want to temporarily change the melody voice without having to edit the MIDI song file in a DAW. For that matter, you can't export the preset (built-in) songs anyway, so there's no way to edit them in a DAW; your only option for playing them with a different melody voice is to use that feature to temporarily change the melody voice.

A user song is a song that you've recorded on the keyboard using its built-in song recorder feature. You can't use the melody voice feature to change the voice of a user song, but there's not really any need to, because you can record the user song using whatever voice you want, and if you decide to use a different voice then you can always change to a different voice and re-record the user song. Also, the "Initial Send" function has no purpose if you're recording a user song, because all of the keyboard's settings will be saved inside the song anyway. The only time you'd need to worry about using "Initial Send" for a user song would be if you've already recorded a user song on the keyboard and you want to transmit it to a DAW in MIDI form so you can modify it in some way-- changing the voices, correcting mistakes, adding more tracks to it, etc.

And if you're recording the MIDI in a DAW, you can change the voice in the DAW if you want to.
 
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I'm not sure we're talking about the same thing.

The option to change the voice that will be used to play the melody part (channel 1) of a preset song or MIDI song file is only useful if you have an existing song file and you want to temporarily change the melody voice without having to edit the MIDI song file in a DAW. For that matter, you can't export the preset (built-in) songs anyway, so there's no way to edit them in a DAW; your only option for playing them with a different melody voice is to use that feature to temporarily change the melody voice.

A user song is a song that you've recorded on the keyboard using its built-in song recorder feature. You can't use the melody voice feature to change the voice of a user song, but there's not really any need to, because you can record the user song using whatever voice you want, and if you decide to use a different voice then you can always change to a different voice and re-record the user song. Also, the "Initial Send" function has no purpose if you're recording a user song, because all of the keyboard's settings will be saved inside the song anyway. The only time you'd need to worry about using "Initial Send" for a user song would be if you've already recorded a user song on the keyboard and you want to transmit it to a DAW in MIDI form so you can modify it in some way-- changing the voices, correcting mistakes, adding more tracks to it, etc.

And if you're recording the MIDI in a DAW, you can change the voice in the DAW if you want to.
sir your answer is bit different then what I was expecting. For sure I guess we are taking about two different things here. well let me check Intial send function in PSR E363. I am using FL Studio 20. I will update here soon
 

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