Sticky key


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My 10 year old KN2400 recently developed a small problem. One of the notes keeps on playing regardless of settings. We are experiencing a hot and high humidity summer in Sydney -Australia. A friend suggested that the issue could be the collected amount of dust over 10 years combined with the humidity.
So I need to get to the key contacts. I don't want to unnecessarily dismantle my beloved KN2400. I am looking for any advice as to how I can get the shortest access to the keyboard contacts.
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
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It's probably worse than simple dust and crud under the key contacts. It's probably a bit of sugar or syrup as well.

Whether you like it or not, you'll have to rip the beast open and properly clean the key contacts. If you're uncomfortable with such a procedure I'd advise sending it to a tech.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=fixing+technics+keyboard

If you do end up taking it apart yourself use a digital camera to record every step so you can reverse the procedure to reassemble and be sure to use a felt marker to mark the polarities of any connectors you unseat.

Gary ;)
 
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Thanks happyrat1. I watched the link you gave me which gave me the confidence to tackle the job which turned out quite simple - unscrewed about 30 screws. I found that my keyboard was very similar to what was shown on the videos. I was pleased to discover that the design of the contacts was such that there was no way any crud could have entered. I found that the rubber material of the contacts was still very tactile. The contacts looked clean but I gave them a good rub anyway. Reassembly was very easy. The rubber contact strips were dropped back into a "rack". They cannot be reattached to the circuit board - the contact strips do not have location lugs (unlike other keyboards). Pressure of the screwed down circuit board recreates a perfect seal. A technician who did not even have Technics experience was happy to charge me AU$250 per hour to have a look at it - with no guarantee that he could fix the problem. It took about 1 1/2 hours.
 
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Fred Coulter

Collector of ancient keyboards
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I would point out that the technician probably would have done the job faster than you, so it wouldn't have cost AU$375.

Still, doing it your self was free (a great cost) and since you were successful, a great morale booster.
 

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