Voices...

Discussion in 'General Keyboard Discussion' started by chongjasmine, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. chongjasmine

    chongjasmine

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    Which keyboard can store the most voices/tones?
    Which keyboard comes with the most amount of voices/tones?
     
    chongjasmine, Jul 21, 2018
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  2. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    I have over 3000 patches on my Kurzweil PC3K8. Of those, about 1000 are user loaded patches.

    Some newer keyboards have more sample memory but tend to use them for larger individual samples.

    The nice thing about Kurzweil samples is that they are retained when the power is switched off and then on again.

    I guess what it boils down to is "How many patches does anyone really need?"

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Jul 22, 2018
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  3. chongjasmine

    chongjasmine

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    Thanks.
     
    chongjasmine, Aug 10, 2018
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  4. chongjasmine

    Biggles

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    Your questions really are not related to what seems to be your budget point.

    In another post you ask about alternatives to the Yamaha E 463 and at that price point the number of instrument voices are what they are.

    For the flexibilty of numbers you will need to increase your budget significantly to purchase a keyboard that can match the requirements to add to the numbers of voices.
     
    Biggles, Aug 10, 2018
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  5. chongjasmine

    SeaGtGruff I meant to play that note! Moderator

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    One thing-- the only thing-- that you can do to "add" more voices to a keyboard that doesn't let you import new sound samples would be to create "user" voices. These are voices that use sound samples which are already built into the keyboard, but where you've made changes to the parameters that control things like attack time, release time, filter cutoff frequency, filter resonance level, and the various effects settings. This is definitely not the same as being able to import completely new sound samples, but it does at least give you some limited ability to create "new" voices on a keyboard.

    Both the Yamaha PSR-E463 and the Casio CT-X3000/5000 will let you do this. However, the Casio models are superior to the Yamaha in this respect, partly because they let you modify certain parameters that aren't available on the Yamaha, and partly because they let you save the modified voices as user voices which are separate from the registrations. Note that the CT-X700/800 do not (as far as I know) let you edit and save user voices the way the CT-X3000/5000 do.

    The lowest-priced Yamaha that actually lets you load new voices is the PSR-S670.
     
    SeaGtGruff, Aug 10, 2018
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  6. chongjasmine

    chongjasmine

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    I am currently looking for a keyboard around e463 budget, but I am saving up for a better quality keyboard.
    Hope to find up which keyboard offers the most voices, so that I can save up towards that.
     
    chongjasmine, Aug 10, 2018
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  7. chongjasmine

    Biggles

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    Honestly as you are at the base of the learning tree I would suggest that you save your money and buy a Yamaha PSR E263 or 363 rather than a 463.

    The 263 is 1/2 the price of a 463 and the 363 is not much more than a 263.

    Both are still very fine instruments to learn on and with saving at least £100 on buying say a 363 you then have £100 to keep in the Bank towards a better keyboard in a couple of years.

    I belong to a Keyboard group and we have a couple of E263 keyboards that new members to playing can use, all they need is a few instrument voices and a few of the installed Styles and they get to make music fairly quickly hence why I am suggesting what I am.
     
    Biggles, Aug 10, 2018
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  8. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    Actually to be honest if she wants the most possible sounds for the least amount of money her best bet (If she's willing to have a computer hooked up at all times) is to get a 61 key controller and run any of hundreds of freely available VSTi's out there.

    I'd suggest starting with an Arturia Keylab Essential 61...

    https://www.arturia.com/keylab-essential-61/overview

    https://www.amazon.com/Arturia-KeyLab-Essential-Controller-Keyboard/dp/B06ZY18Z89/

    And start googling for free VST instruments.

    https://www.google.ca/search?num=10...l-Aby6rDgDg&q=free+vst+instruments&oq=free+vs

    https://blog.landr.com/best-free-vst-plugins-2016/

    Basically for $250 USD plus taxes and shipping she'll have a remarkable instrument that will blow away anything Yamaha offers for under a $1000 USD.

    If I were starting out these days this is probably the route I would have taken.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Aug 10, 2018
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  9. chongjasmine

    SeaGtGruff I meant to play that note! Moderator

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    Regarding the PSR-E263 or PSR-E363, I'd recommend the PSR-E363 because it has a velocity-sensitive keyboard, whereas the PSR-E263 does not.

    Also, a PSR-E363 can be hooked up to a computer via USB and used as a basic controller for soft synths and other virtual instruments-- it just doesn't have additional controls such as knobs and sliders. The PSR-E263 has no way to connect to a computer, so you can't use it as a controller.
     
    SeaGtGruff, Aug 10, 2018
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  10. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    I'd be willing to wager that the Arturia controllers which use Fatar keybeds are seriously superior in feel to a low end Yamaha. They also come with true 5 pin MIDI ports and CV connectors for future expansion for analog and digital modules.

    And her selection of voices would be virtually infinite if she goes the soft synth route.

    Why spend $300 on a cheap Chinese built Yamaha synth that you will probably want to sell off again in a couple of years when you could have a quality professional grade controller that will last you a lifetime for about the same money?

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Aug 10, 2018
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  11. chongjasmine

    SeaGtGruff I meant to play that note! Moderator

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    I didn't realize the 61-key Arturia was that inexpensive. It would definitely be a better option than an inexpensive keyboard if your sole intention is to use virtual instruments.

    The advantage of getting an inexpensive keyboard that can double as a basic controller would be the ability to play without needing to be connected to a computer, without needing to have external speakers connected, and (if using batteries) without needing to have it plugged into an electrical outlet.

    So it all depends on your needs and wants. I bought a 61-key controller (M-Audio Axiom) that has a lot of additional controls, and am very glad that I did. But not long after that I bought a portable keyboard (Yamaha PSR-E433) that has built-in speakers and can play its own sounds, and am also very glad that I did. And I don't want to tell you how much I've spent on high-end soft synths-- plus all the free ones, of course. I don't regret any of it, but I could have taken all of that money and spent it on a really nice high-end hard synth.
     
    SeaGtGruff, Aug 10, 2018
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  12. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    The OP expressed that she was looking for the best value in an obsolescence proof synth that could load external voices.

    The Arturia controllers are very reasonably priced and have professional quality keybeds plus all the expansion capabilities you'd want in a decent controller and they even ship with free licenses of some of Arturia's commercial soft synths.

    If I were starting out again today I'd wish someone had shown me this option before I'd gone thru the long and tedious path of upgrades and trade ins I went thru in the past 25 years.

    Considering what you get for the money with the Keylab Essential 61 for roughly the same money as the absolute bottom of the pile from Yamaha's offerings I'd say it's a no brainer.

    A great controller at beginner's prices with the capability of growing with you for decades to come.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Aug 10, 2018
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  13. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    BTW, I recently bought an Arturia Keystep for soft synth use and was so impressed I've put my Alesis QX49 up for sale and ordered an Arturia Keylab Essentials 49 to replace it.

    The build quality and keyboard feel on these controllers is phenomenal. :)

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Aug 10, 2018
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  14. chongjasmine

    Eric Barker

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    I'm not sure the Essentials use Fatar beds. I've been talking with many Keylab users, and I've heard the Essentials are severely inferior to the Mk1 and new Mk2 controllers. The Mk2s are coming out pretty much ANY DAY. Yes, they are about 50% more than the Essentials, but they're fantastic controllers, and supposed to be an upgrade from the Mk2.

    I've been eyeballing the Mk2 and wondering if they'll come out with an 88 version... I have two Keylab88 Mk1s, and they're fantastic, but if they upgrade to an even higher-end keybed, I might be seduced.

    I've actually never used Analog Lab. As I have Komplete running in MainStage, along with many other VIs, I never had much interest in diving into that can of worms, but many people absolutely love it. I find Arturia's synths to be a bit hit or miss. Their Prophet is fantastic, and I use it daily, I've heard their pianos are great too. Their Oberheim and B3 left much to be desired though. I do feel like they overdosing their UIs to death (B3 is a nightmare). But this doesn't apply to Analog Lab anyway, which is all under one clean roof.
     
    Eric Barker, Aug 10, 2018
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  15. chongjasmine

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    Thanks for the heads up on the keybeds Eric.

    I'll know next week when it arrives and if I have any problems with it I'll send it back.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Aug 10, 2018
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