What Are The Differences From This Keyboard Piano


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i go to music classes and use wood piano i want keyboard paino for home and maybe use it other places as pro use as i dont like wasting money random as my job dont not make that much i want to play with similar feeling like the wood one as easier to switch and i may use software synthesia avid pro tools reaper and some apple ipad games midi and which one feels more real as keys
Yamaha P115 vs Casio Privia PX160

https://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical_instruments/pianos/p_series/p-115/index.html

http://www.casio.com/products/electronic-musical-instruments/privia-digital-pianos/px-160
 
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Hi Patricia

I was in the exact same position myself and had come down on the side of the Yamaha (just better all round). Then Roland released the FP-30 (https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/FP30BK). The FP 30 is the best entry level digital piano; it's grand piano sound is fantastic and it also has ivory feel keys and not the plasticky ones on the Casio and Yamaha. It is a little more expensive, but well worth it.
 
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Being more of a workstation guy, I had to do some research when my inlaws were looking for a simple electric piano. I recommended the Yamaha P115 for them. Then when I went up to visit, I played their piano and a friend's new Casio PX160... boy do I feel bad. The Yamaha sounded pretty terrible by comparison. So now I always recommend the Casio if it's between those two. I've never played on an FP-30, though. I'll look into that the next time people come to me for advice.
 
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Roland FP-30 has great piano sound and "real piano" key action. After researching on Internet, I found it one of the best "digital piano" at $1000 range (kawai ES110 is similar). So I bought one and loved it. The only thing is it dosent have the auto-accompaniment feature which is used in some keyboard teaching books.
 
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Rayblewit

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For example, " the complete keyboard player book", by Kenneth Baker.
I've never seen a keyboard teaching book that uses the auto-accompaniment feature.
I am with Fred.
I have a series of books by Baker as mentioned above. Great books indeed.
But to my knowledge there is no reference to auto acompiament. There is just the recommended chord printed above the stave.
Playing the auto acompiament with left hand is a personal choice. Whether you play the tune bossa, rumba, samba (for example) is optional. Maybe Baker makes some suggestions . . Is all.
Cheers ray:)
 
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Hi Ray and Fred. Perhaps you guys are looking for more advanced feature of auto-accompaniment? I read the 2012 edition two weeks ago , and found one chapter titled accompaniment. It was super basic, only tells reader where it is and how to turn it on. But I was so happy to find it:), because my previous training was all about piano-type scale- Apreggio -chords-timing etc. , I didn't know keyboard could be so different from piano and so intelligent. :D
 
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Yes fred. Here's a screen shot of the accompaniment page in case you are interested. Again, very basic info.
 

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Fred Coulter

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Yeah, I was thinking about picking up a copy and seeing what it says. I've asked around, and there's very little out there about using auto-arrangement features artistically.

I will point out that auto-accompaniment features on a keyboard is one of the Great Schisms of keyboard players. There are many keyboard players that swear by them, and just as many (and possibly more) that curse them as the devil's playground. (Similar to synthesizers vs. "real" keyboards in the early 70s.)

Generally the keyboards with auto-accompaniment features (as opposed to built in sequencers or algorithmic features) are called arrangers. If you have questions about Yamaha arrangers or just want to maximize your usage of your keyboard, you really need to add psrtutorial.com to your often visited web sites list. Amazing resource.
 
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Rayblewit

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I read the 2012 edition two weeks ago , and found one chapter titled accompaniment.
That makes sense. I learnt from that exact book. It was an earlier edition 2007 thereabouts. Superb course by Baker. I also bought books 2 and 3 and went on to his advanced books.
I did learn how to use auto accompiament from this book. Never looked back.
My one regret is that it made me lazy and I never got to learn bass playing with left hand. The bass stave is different than the treble stave. I am having too much fun to dedicate time and practise.
Lazy Ray
 
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Yeah, I was thinking about picking up a copy and seeing what it says. I've asked around, and there's very little out there about using auto-arrangement features artistically.

I will point out that auto-accompaniment features on a keyboard is one of the Great Schisms of keyboard players. There are many keyboard players that swear by them, and just as many (and possibly more) that curse them as the devil's playground. (Similar to synthesizers vs. "real" keyboards in the early 70s.)

Generally the keyboards with auto-accompaniment features (as opposed to built in sequencers or algorithmic features) are called arrangers. If you have questions about Yamaha arrangers or just want to maximize your usage of your keyboard, you really need to add psrtutorial.com to your often visited web sites list. Amazing resource.
Thank you Fred for the info and link.
 
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That makes sense. I learnt from that exact book. It was an earlier edition 2007 thereabouts. Superb course by Baker. I also bought books 2 and 3 and went on to his advanced books.
I did learn how to use auto accompiament from this book. Never looked back.
My one regret is that it made me lazy and I never got to learn bass playing with left hand. The bass stave is different than the treble stave. I am having too much fun to dedicate time and practise.
Lazy Ray
I always wondered why my school doesn't teach auto-accompaniment, now that you mention ur experience, I think its probably because they want students to develop the bass stave skills first...:D
 

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