What is the best keyboard for beginner?


Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
I am 23 years old. Few months ago I started learning music. I am bit confused in choosing a keyboard, I am planning to go for yamaha
PSR I455. Can anyone please guide me on this?
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Rayblewit

Love Music / Love Life
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Messages
2,381
Reaction score
1,901
Location
Melbourne Australia
Last edited:

Fred Coulter

Collector of ancient keyboards
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
825
Reaction score
427
Location
Central Florida
What are your goals with your keyboard playing? Are you planning on playing piano, or sticking with electronic keyboards? IF you're planning on going the piano route, you really should learn on something with 88 weighted keys. If not, then a five octave unweighted keyboard should be fine. (Don't go less than five octaves on your first keyboard.)
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
78
Reaction score
33
Location
Calgary
I know this concept may be hard to perceive for many beginners, myself included last year. But DO google about piano vs electronic keyboard, they are VERY different. As Fred asked, you may want to think about your goal and preference of music before purchase.
One friend wanted to learn piano and bought a fairly decent 61-key casio, then found out not enough keys for his exercises half a year later. The other friend's piano teacher nagged him to sell the one with unweighted keys and get a digital piano with weighted keys for proper piano training..LOL
 

Fred Coulter

Collector of ancient keyboards
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
825
Reaction score
427
Location
Central Florida
One friend wanted to learn piano and bought a fairly decent 61-key casio, then found out not enough keys for his exercises half a year later.
I'm trying to figure out what beginner exercises would extend beyond a five octave keyboard. Generally, you don't need to go further until you hit late Romantic and Contemporary classical literature. (The weighted keys, on the other hand, are necessary.)

Your piano teacher works for you. If you aren't happy with them, look for a different teacher. If you're using an electronic keyboard, even one with weighted keys, you may find teachers who are classical snots. You can do better.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
78
Reaction score
33
Location
Calgary
I'm trying to figure out what beginner exercises would extend beyond a five octave keyboard.
I agree. I think it was because of the piece of music he was asked to work on. The left-hand part was far away from right-hand part, even though each hand only works within its own octave:) i think he could have used the built-in feature to simply shift the whole keyboard one octave down and that would work, but I guess he didn't know how, and only talked about it after changing keyboard:)
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
What are your goals with your keyboard playing? Are you planning on playing piano, or sticking with electronic keyboards? IF you're planning on going the piano route, you really should learn on something with 88 weighted keys. If not, then a five octave unweighted keyboard should be fine. (Don't go less than five octaves on your first keyboard.)
At this point my focus is on electronic keyboards.
 

Fred Coulter

Collector of ancient keyboards
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
825
Reaction score
427
Location
Central Florida
At this point my focus is on electronic keyboards.
Then a five octave unweighted keyboard would be fine for you. The next question has to do with how you want to play and your eventual goal. This is the big arranger keyboard question.

If your goal is to just have fun, or to be a "one man band" with full accompaniment, then you may want to get an arranger. Arrangers have built in rhythms and full accompaniment, usually controlled by the chords (or notes) you play with your left hand. If you're playing with a singer or a solo instrument (saxophone, etc.), then this could very well be the way you want to go. (The Yamaha PSR series of keyboards are all arrangers.)

But if you want to play more complex music where you have more control over what the bass is doing, or if you want to play with a drummer and/or bass player, then arranger features are far less important to you. You can use an arranger to play more traditionally, but it becomes very easy to start relying on the auto-accompaniment features and let your left hand stay weak. (An example of more complex music would be playing a piece like Money by Pink Floyd. The bass line is essential to the piece, and it's not in a "normal" time signature. I doubt that you'd be able to play it well using auto-accompaniment features.)

One advantage of an arranger, especially for a beginner, is that you have to buy less stuff. Most arrangers have built in speakers, so you won't have to buy an amplifier and speakers. But if you want to play out, you'll still need to get some sort of real amplification for gigs. Eventually. When you're good enough.

I own an arranger, a Tyros 5. (I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner; it's a bit pricy.) Even if I skip the arranger features, it has some really nice sounds built in, interesting ensemble features which automatically allocate instruments, vocal processing, and easily accessible splits and layers. So its quite usable even excluding the auto-accompaniment.

The other question is your budget. I wouldn't spend a lot of money for a first keyboard. You can always upgrade as you outgrow your keyboard.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Then a five octave unweighted keyboard would be fine for you. The next question has to do with how you want to play and your eventual goal. This is the big arranger keyboard question.

If your goal is to just have fun, or to be a "one man band" with full accompaniment, then you may want to get an arranger. Arrangers have built in rhythms and full accompaniment, usually controlled by the chords (or notes) you play with your left hand. If you're playing with a singer or a solo instrument (saxophone, etc.), then this could very well be the way you want to go. (The Yamaha PSR series of keyboards are all arrangers.)

But if you want to play more complex music where you have more control over what the bass is doing, or if you want to play with a drummer and/or bass player, then arranger features are far less important to you. You can use an arranger to play more traditionally, but it becomes very easy to start relying on the auto-accompaniment features and let your left hand stay weak. (An example of more complex music would be playing a piece like Money by Pink Floyd. The bass line is essential to the piece, and it's not in a "normal" time signature. I doubt that you'd be able to play it well using auto-accompaniment features.)

One advantage of an arranger, especially for a beginner, is that you have to buy less stuff. Most arrangers have built in speakers, so you won't have to buy an amplifier and speakers. But if you want to play out, you'll still need to get some sort of real amplification for gigs. Eventually. When you're good enough.

I own an arranger, a Tyros 5. (I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner; it's a bit pricy.) Even if I skip the arranger features, it has some really nice sounds built in, interesting ensemble features which automatically allocate instruments, vocal processing, and easily accessible splits and layers. So its quite usable even excluding the auto-accompaniment.

The other question is your budget. I wouldn't spend a lot of money for a first keyboard. You can always upgrade as you outgrow your keyboard.
Then a five octave unweighted keyboard would be fine for you. The next question has to do with how you want to play and your eventual goal. This is the big arranger keyboard question.

If your goal is to just have fun, or to be a "one man band" with full accompaniment, then you may want to get an arranger. Arrangers have built in rhythms and full accompaniment, usually controlled by the chords (or notes) you play with your left hand. If you're playing with a singer or a solo instrument (saxophone, etc.), then this could very well be the way you want to go. (The Yamaha PSR series of keyboards are all arrangers.)

But if you want to play more complex music where you have more control over what the bass is doing, or if you want to play with a drummer and/or bass player, then arranger features are far less important to you. You can use an arranger to play more traditionally, but it becomes very easy to start relying on the auto-accompaniment features and let your left hand stay weak. (An example of more complex music would be playing a piece like Money by Pink Floyd. The bass line is essential to the piece, and it's not in a "normal" time signature. I doubt that you'd be able to play it well using auto-accompaniment features.)

One advantage of an arranger, especially for a beginner, is that you have to buy less stuff. Most arrangers have built in speakers, so you won't have to buy an amplifier and speakers. But if you want to play out, you'll still need to get some sort of real amplification for gigs. Eventually. When you're good enough.

I own an arranger, a Tyros 5. (I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner; it's a bit pricy.) Even if I skip the arranger features, it has some really nice sounds built in, interesting ensemble features which automatically allocate instruments, vocal processing, and easily accessible splits and layers. So its quite usable even excluding the auto-accompaniment.

The other question is your budget. I wouldn't spend a lot of money for a first keyboard. You can always upgrade as you outgrow your keyboard.
I want to be a part of a band. I am very new to music but I am very eager to achieve something in music.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Fred Coulter

Collector of ancient keyboards
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
825
Reaction score
427
Location
Central Florida
I want to be a part of a band.
Then I'd be looking at more traditional keyboards. There are some good cheap (used) keyboards out there. You'll need to also budget money for live amplification, but you won't need to buy that at the same time. (Headphones are your friend.)
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top