What training does everyone have?


Joined
Sep 12, 2018
Messages
23
Reaction score
22
I've just realised that I've been learning to play piano/keyboard for around a year at some point this month! I started with a beginners keyboard book, and I think I've had about 10 piano lessons (half a dozen way back at the start, and recently started again). I can play a few piano grade 1 pieces reasonably well, but when it comes to joining in with others with the keyboard, I'm pretty limited to playing a few complimentary chords.

What sort of training does everyone here have? I'm guessing there will be a selection of self-taught and classically trained pianists and keyboard wizards!
 

Becky

Administrator
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
1,198
Reaction score
807
I did piano lessons up to the age of about 16, but I never took any exams. I guess I got up to about Grade 6/7, but my skills have definitely slipped since then! I wish I'd learned proper chords, it was never a focus during my lessons.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2018
Messages
23
Reaction score
22
I really wish I had started learning when I was younger. I'm 34 now, and it feels strange passing kids aged under 10 (who are probably way ahead of me!) as I go in for a lesson!
 

Becky

Administrator
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
1,198
Reaction score
807
I really wish I had started learning when I was younger. I'm 34 now, and it feels strange passing kids aged under 10 (who are probably way ahead of me!) as I go in for a lesson!
Better late than never! It's easier to learn new things when you're young because your mind is like a sponge, but there are advantages to learning when you're older. If you start later in life it's because there's a real passion there, whereas for me it felt like a chore when I was younger. Don't get me wrong, I still really enjoy it, but it took a while to come back round to that point. There are upsides and downsides to everything ;)
 

tjw

Joined
Aug 27, 2018
Messages
73
Reaction score
48
If your mind is challenged, it will still be "spongy". Maybe not as pliable as when you were young, but sufficient to the task of becoming a good musician.

I started piano lessons when I was 5 and kept going until maybe 13 or 14. I was extremely blessed to have had a grammar-school band teacher who had himself been a working musician. He allowed me to conduct the band and I learned to read scores from him. He taught me the ranges and transpositions (and I still write for the violas in C-clef even though Cakewalk doesn't care :) )
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
7,411
Reaction score
3,109
I wish I'd learned proper chords, it was never a focus during my lessons.
I just posted these in the Tutorial Links Thread the Other Day Becky... A marvelous explanation of chord theory and the circle of fifths.

Watch these a few times and you'll be recognizing chords and key signatures like a politician recognizes a free meal :D :D :D



Gary ;)
 

Becky

Administrator
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
1,198
Reaction score
807
Those videos look useful, thanks @happyrat1! I'll take a look over the weekend when I've got some time :)
 
Joined
Jun 28, 2014
Messages
1,430
Reaction score
1,205
What sort of training does everyone here have?
I started learning classical piano as a little bloke in short pants, which my teacher morphed into pop/rock (at my request) in my teens when I got sick of the stress of passing formal music exams in stuffy rooms. This was also around the time that the exams started to include a vocal component. I never could (and still don't) understand why they'd put a young lad through the trauma of singing to pass a piano exam.

I gave the formal lessons away at around age 14 when my high school academic workload started to increase, and since then my keyboard education has been self-driven.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
277
Reaction score
323
Wow! I started piano lessons in September 1962! Here in Toronto i had 3 different piano teachers. I managed to graduate to grade 9. After 10 you have to decide on whether you want to get a degree in performance or teaching. It at the time was called the royal conservative of music. In my late teens I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that I wanted to be a rock musician.
I had studied music in high school, I was good at piano and I had long hair! Also, girls thought I was cute. What more was there to consider?
So, I hooked up with a band, scored a lot of keyboards, looked like Rick Wakeman and rocked the world off a lot of people in the 70's!
Could I play rock? Oh yeah!
Could I play and read classical music any more? Umm, nope.
So the big thing is, was. A better musician. Hard to say.
Today I think I'm a far better musician. My sight reading is dreadful. I can't. But I think I can sit in with any band in the world and kick ass,
 

The Y_man

Moderator
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
980
Reaction score
67
Almost Zip!

I had about 6 months of lessons in primary school grade 3 on a chord organ my parents bought for me (couldn't afford them electone things!!) ~ and that was it.

The rest was "follow the lights" on a Casiotone MT-800 decades later (in high school) as well as getting back to figuring out that everything I learnt for the chord organ (basically a piano accordion with an electric air pump) was usable on the casiotone (chords on LH, melody on RH).

When I discovered synths and MIDI, I started composing and sequencing (on a Yammy QX7 which I still own!)
Oddly enough, while I was sequencing (using my synth as a midi keyboard) I actually got better at playing as well as figuring out what sounded "nice'.

So to this day, I play largely by ear.

Being self taught on a synth means my posture, hand shape and all else is apparently atrocious (so my piano trained wife tells me....) and true, I can get about 10 minutes out of a mini grand before my fingers seize.....

Same for guitar - I was interested in the sound (effects) more than playing (to add to my recordings), so I bought one while I was at uni - only recently did I start actually getting into playing chords :eek:

...and to top it off, a few months ago, someone asked me if I wanted a drum kit...... another interesting challenge!!

The Y-man

p.s. IMHO, if you can play keyboard, you can play drums (ok, that's a serious generalization right there - but pianos and guitar are technically percussion instruments). I suspect most keyboardists can do things with their left hand, right hand and feet independently - voila! Drummer in the making.


p.p.s. Ok, so I am hoping God sends down a Bass Guitar next.... ;)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top