Yamaha Dgx-630 g# sounds louder or vibrating more?

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Hello I think g# sounds louder than the other black keys especially when sustained. I would like to tell me if I am right in order to fix it. Thank you and happy holidays!

 
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SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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It does seem to sound slightly more resonant or "tingly" than the F# and A# keys, but to me it doesn't really sound like it's got a problem per se.

Some keyboards use the same sound sample for a given range of keys, but alter the frequency of the sample for the different notes, which can sometimes give a specific note some odd-sounding overtones as compared to the other notes of the chromatic scale.

I'm not sure how the DGX works in that respect, but another factor is that the notes of a piano are normally tuned according to the 12-tone equal temperament (or "12TET") tuning system, which doesn't have pure harmonic relationships between the notes of the chromatic scale the way that "just intonation" tuning does, so that can sometimes cause certain intervals to sound a bit "off" to some people's ears-- for example, a perfect fifth in the just intonation tuning system is often said to have a "sweeter" tone than a fifth in 12TET, because its frequency has a nice 3:2 harmonic relationship to the root note.

EDIT: Have you tried using one of the other Acoustic Piano voices for comparison? Also, you might try experimenting with different Reverb Type and Chorus Type settings, as well as the Reverb Depth and Chorus Depth settings of the voice.
 
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Thank you for answering! And when I don't put the reverb effect it sounds fine to my ears so at the end I guess it isn't a problem
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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If turning the reverb off or down eliminates or reduces the "tingly" resonant sound, then it's probably caused by the way the harmonic overtones of that note are interacting with each other from the reverberation effect.

Translation: I don't know why it's doing what it's doing, so I'm going to use some fancy words in a sentence to make it sound like I know why it's doing what it's doing. ;)
 
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