Yamaha piaggero np-32 no good!


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unfortunately this keyboard I bought boasts organ and harpsichord sounds. These are totally useless because there is no variable volume with key press so the bass chord playing drowns out the treble (melody) playing. How anyone can sell this (lack of) feature I don't know!

Don't buy this model and its sisters (or any other keyboard that behaves like this) would be my recommendation.

Anyone know a keyboard similar that has proper loadness with key press operation on all its voices? Thanks.
 
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happyrat1

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Look around for a used Casio Privia PX-350 or PX-340.

Far superior to the bottom feeder priced Yamaha entry pianos and you'll probably find one used on craigslist in your area that Daddy's pride and joy gave up cause the lessons were "too hard."

Gary ;)
 

SeaGtGruff

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I'm not sure from your description, but it sounds like you're saying the organ voice(s) and harpsichord voice(s) aren't velocity-sensitive like the other instrument voices? If that's what you're saying, it's because real organs and real harpsichords don't have velocity-sensitive keyboards, and the voices on the Yamaha are programmed to respond accordingly-- or rather, to not respond.
 

Rayblewit

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In fairness to Yamaha, I think this model is designed to emulate the grand piano. That is how they promote it.

I honestly feel for your disappointment that organ and harpsichord sounds are not present to your desire.

Why is harpsichord so important to you? Just curious. I am wondering if any modern keyboard would have any emphasis on the harpsichord sound better than what you already have other than just one or two variations of it.

Having said that, is it not possible to enhance the sound of your np-32 by adding an equaliser or something similar rather than buying another model. Do any other models offer a better harpsichord sound to your liking?

best wishes happyhacker
 

SeaGtGruff

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If the relative volume between two voices is the problem, the NP-32 has functions for balancing the relative volumes of the voices together.

But if velocity sensitivity is the problem, I don't think you'll find velocity-sensitive voices for harpsichord and organ on a Yamaha keyboard, because those instruments don't have velocity-sensitive keyboards in real life. Many organs-- but not harpsichords-- do have expression or swell pedals, but that isn't the same thing as velocity sensitivity. The NP-32 doesn't have a jack for connecting an expression pedal, but it does respond to MIDI Expression messages if you can send them, such as by using a Kenton MIDI USB Host to connect a MIDI controller to the NP-32's USB port, or using a computer or laptop as a go-between.
 

happyrat1

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Sometimes manufacturers don't grasp the concept that "better than real" sounds "better than real."

The Casios aren't bound by that narrow perspective.

Velocity sensitivity is available on all voices on Casios.

Gary ;)
 

SeaGtGruff

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I think most Yamaha models are sample-based, and I don't think there are any velocity-sensitive harpsichords to sample from. ;)

One can always create a harpsichord-like synth sound, but then it's a "synth harpsichord," not a harpsichord per se.
 
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happyrat1

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Even a sampled sound can be tweaked and adjusted and modulated.

There are strong arguments for both modelling type synths as well as PCM sampled synths.

Regardless of whether or not an instrument can be sampled at different volume levels it's not a technological stretch to include velocity control in the envelope generators.

What it boils down to is whether or not Yamaha allows velocity controlled envelopes as opposed to Casio and multiple other major synth manufacturers out there who offer far more tweakable envelopes.

Just now I performed a quick and dirty experiment on my Roland Juno DS61. Both Organs and Harpsichords are fully under velocity control.

Like I said, if all you are looking for is realism with all its warts and sores then stick with Yamaha but if you are looking for BETTER than real, then there are plenty of other synth manufacturers out there who offer superior control and tweakability.

Gary ;)
 

Fred Coulter

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These are totally useless because there is no variable volume with key press so the bass chord playing drowns out the treble (melody) playing. How anyone can sell this (lack of) feature I don't know!
When you emulate an existing instrument, the biggest issue you have is whether to produce a clone of the original instrument or to build on the original instrument and create something new. Classical musicians would want their organs and harpsichords to act like the original.

Organs (generally) and harpsichords (always) are not touch sensitive. Striking the key harder or softer doesn't change anything. So the lack of variable volume with key press isn't a bug, it's a feature. I wouldn't call them useless. Is a trumpet useless because it can't play a chord?

(If you want something that sounds a bit like a harpsichord but does have velocity sensitivity, then look for a clavichord, or the modern electric equivalent, the clavinet. Of course, the vast majority won't include the main feature of the clavichord, the polyphonic touch sensitivity affecting the pitch of the note. But polyphonic aftertouch is pretty damn rare nowadays.)
 

Fred Coulter

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Sometimes manufacturers don't grasp the concept that "better than real" sounds "better than real."
I'm trying to imagine a velocity sensitive harpsichord playing the Goldberg Variations. I'm pretty sure that Bach specifically didn't want them played on instruments that were velocity sensitive. Otherwise he wouldn't have specified that they were to be played on harpsichord. (The clavichord was a popular instrument at the time, and IS velocity sensitive. If he didn't care, he wouldn't have specified only the harpsichord.)
 

happyrat1

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Simple fact of the matter though, is that velocity sensitivity is totally optional on synths that have it.

Synths which lack it outright missed the boat in my estimation.

To my mind I can't ever think of a situation where lack of expression is a good thing.

And Carlos' Switched on Bach and Switched on Brandenburgs were both examples of modern technology improving on the original. ;)

Gary ;)
 
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