How to count this 4 beat measure?

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I can see why it's easier just counting 1 &, 2 &, 3 &, 4 &... It was mostly to get into the habit of counting for 16th notes, at least until I'm confident enough to be able to switch between the two ways of counting.

btw. . @Neutron . What is that tune you posted? I would like to play it.
Ray
Heh... it's a computer-generated, random tune. It's really just for practising reading sheet music.

The OP was confused by a half note and a full note taking up ONE beat.
Isn't it an eight note and a quarter note? I thought a full note lasted all 4 beats in a measure and a half note ... well, half of it? Or am I mistaking?
 
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I thought a full note lasted all 4 beats in a measure and a half note ... well, half of it? Or am I mistaking?
The answer to this question depends on the time signature of the song. In the case of 4/4, which means four quarter notes per bar, then yes, you'd be correct.

But if the song were to be 3/4, this would mean there are only three quarter notes per bar. A whole note would theoretically spill over into the next bar. That said, the written sheet music would not contain any whole notes, so it's a bit of a moot point.
 
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Yes of course, it depends on the time signature. Ok, anyway thanks for all the help once again!
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
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Yes, for 3/4 time a whole bar would correspond to a dotted half note.

For full-on insanity, go look up "mensural notation," which is what our modern notation has developed out of. In mensural notation, it turns out that what we call a "whole" note is actually a "semibreve," or half of a "short" note. A "breve" or short note is equivalent to two of our whole notes. A "longa" or long note is equivalent to four of our whole notes. And a "maxima" is equivalent to eight of our whole notes. Just imagine trying to sing a single note and hold it for eight measures without taking another breath along the way!
 
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Yes, for 3/4 time a whole bar would correspond to a dotted half note.

For full-on insanity, go look up "mensural notation," which is what our modern notation has developed out of. In mensural notation, it turns out that what we call a "whole" note is actually a "semibreve," or half of a "short" note. A "breve" or short note is equivalent to two of our whole notes. A "longa" or long note is equivalent to four of our whole notes. And a "maxima" is equivalent to eight of our whole notes. Just imagine trying to sing a single note and hold it for eight measures without taking another breath along the way!
Haha, gotta say that last line made me grin. It's always nice to learn something new.
 

Rayblewit

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I found this vid.
Quite interesting .
 
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I found this vid.
Quite interesting .
That's an excellent vid Ray. Thanks for sharing.

I have worked with many musicians who really struggle with this stuff - trying to feel their way through songs they think they know instead of counting the beats to ensure their timing is correct.
 
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Justin Sandercoe is the best Guitar teacher online, an Aussie who lives in the UK is a regular Radio guest and prolific online video tutorial poster

His series on Stairwayto Heaven is brilliant.


OK it is guitar based but heck so is Jimmy Page.
 
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Really interesting listening to Justin's take on the timing into the solo compared to the American chap in the video that Ray posted.

Video one: The first guitar strum starts on the "1" of the bar
Video two: There's an added bar of 9/8 before the drums kick back in

Both solutions work, but I much prefer the simplicity of the explanation in the first video - would be much easier to sync a whole band using that methodology too. If I ever play Stairway I'll remember that.
 
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