Kawai MP7 or Roland JUNO DS-76?

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Good evening all, I'm a keyboard player in a band and unsure which to pick between these two models, price is pretty much the same so I would really appreciate any help choosing. The genres we play are mostly rock/blues/jazz.
Thanks in advance!
 
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Welcome.

First choice the Juno, but do take a look at the specs of both and you will see why.

The Juno is only just over 15 lbs, whereas the Kawai is a slab well over 50 lbs.

Me though, I would spend more cash on the Roland 07, same weight as the aging Juno but a model that is only a couple of years old.
 
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I do see your point.
As for the Fantom (if it's the 07 you're referring to) I'm afraid it's a little above my budget :/ but I hope the Juno stands the test of time lol
 
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unsure which to pick between these two models, price is pretty much the same so I would really appreciate any help choosing. The genres we play are mostly rock/blues/jazz.

I think you'll find that the piano, EP, and tonewheel organ sounds of the Kawai are far superior to those of the DS76, while most other sounds are better in the Roland.

The hammer action of the Kawai is far better for playing pianos, the unweighted action of the Roland will generally be preferable for organ/synth stuff (though Kawai does a better job with organ than most hammer action boards do).

The Roland has tons more sounds in it (1200+ vs. 256), with far more sound customization/editing capabilities. The Roland lets you save 256 of your own customized user patches. The Kawai doesn't support saving of individual user sounds as their own entities, but you can store your customized sounds as part of Setups, which I'll get back to.

In terms of sound combinations, the Roland allows you to split/layer up to 16 sounds within its 128 polyphony. The Kawai only lets you split/layer up to 4 sounds, but has 256 polyphony, so which is more capable for layering depends on what you're trying to do. On the Roland, these sound combinations have 3 insert effects, which can be assigned any way you want; the Kawai has 4 insert effects which are assigned as two to your first sound, and one each to your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th sounds. (Meaning that each has some effect assignment capabilities the other lacks.) The Kawai lets you save 256 of your own sound combinations ("Setups"), the Roland lets you save 128 ("Performances"). Though getting back to what I said in the previous paragraph, the 256 Kawai Setup locations are also what you'd use for saving individual customized sounds (which provides less flexibility in re-using those sounds, compared to the Roland approach of having a separate storage area for them).

I'd say the Kawai is a stronger MIDI controller if you're going to integrate sounds from an external source (e.g. an iPad or external sound module).

Both have the ability to switch from one sound to the other without the held/decaying notes of the first sound cutting out. However, while the sound on the DS won't cut-out, you may hear a glitch and sound alteration depending on the effects on the sounds you are switching between. IIRC, the sound switching on the Kawai doesn't have that issue, though sounds won't hold if you're switching to or from one of its tonewheel organ sounds (where it uses a dedicated 9-drawbar tonewheel organ engine, something the Roland doesn't have).

Summing up, I'd say if your focus is piano, EP, and even organ (despite the action factor), the Kawai is the stronger board for that scenario, if you can deal with the weight, while on balance, the Roland is generally stronger for total flexibility, though one of the other things I mentioned above could sway you more toward one or the other as well.

The Juno is only just over 15 lbs, whereas the Kawai is a slab well over 50 lbs.

The Kawai is actually 46 lbs. Still not a lightweight, though.
 
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I think you'll find that the piano, EP, and tonewheel organ sounds of the Kawai are far superior to those of the DS76, while most other sounds are better in the Roland.

The hammer action of the Kawai is far better for playing pianos, the unweighted action of the Roland will generally be preferable for organ/synth stuff (though Kawai does a better job with organ than most hammer action boards do).

The Roland has tons more sounds in it (1200+ vs. 256), with far more sound customization/editing capabilities. The Roland lets you save 256 of your own customized user patches. The Kawai doesn't support saving of individual user sounds as their own entities, but you can store your customized sounds as part of Setups, which I'll get back to.

In terms of sound combinations, the Roland allows you to split/layer up to 16 sounds within its 128 polyphony. The Kawai only lets you split/layer up to 4 sounds, but has 256 polyphony, so which is more capable for layering depends on what you're trying to do. On the Roland, these sound combinations have 3 insert effects, which can be assigned any way you want; the Kawai has 4 insert effects which are assigned as two to your first sound, and one each to your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th sounds. (Meaning that each has some effect assignment capabilities the other lacks.) The Kawai lets you save 256 of your own sound combinations ("Setups"), the Roland lets you save 128 ("Performances"). Though getting back to what I said in the previous paragraph, the 256 Kawai Setup locations are also what you'd use for saving individual customized sounds (which provides less flexibility in re-using those sounds, compared to the Roland approach of having a separate storage area for them).

I'd say the Kawai is a stronger MIDI controller if you're going to integrate sounds from an external source (e.g. an iPad or external sound module).

Both have the ability to switch from one sound to the other without the held/decaying notes of the first sound cutting out. However, while the sound on the DS won't cut-out, you may hear a glitch and sound alteration depending on the effects on the sounds you are switching between. IIRC, the sound switching on the Kawai doesn't have that issue, though sounds won't hold if you're switching to or from one of its tonewheel organ sounds (where it uses a dedicated 9-drawbar tonewheel organ engine, something the Roland doesn't have).

Summing up, I'd say if your focus is piano, EP, and even organ (despite the action factor), the Kawai is the stronger board for that scenario, if you can deal with the weight, while on balance, the Roland is generally stronger for total flexibility, though one of the other things I mentioned above could sway you more toward one or the other as well.



The Kawai is actually 46 lbs. Still not a lightweight, though.
Many thanks for all these details that I previously ignored. You've convinced me to go with the JUNO, sounds like a lot of fun!
 
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Many thanks for all these details that I previously ignored. You've convinced me to go with the JUNO, sounds like a lot of fun!

Good choice. JunoDS has an amazing price/value ratio and its a blast for live playing. Weaker pianos and EPs can be compensated in many ways:

a) You can edit any of the stock patches to get a better sound more to your liking
b) You can layer two or more sounds to get a "fatter" sound
c) You can buy sound libraries for the Juno with ready-to-use patches for many popular songs
d) If you use iPad or a Laptop for live playing, you can download great piano & EPs VSTs and play them from the JunoDS.
 

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