Yamaha Arranger anomaly

Rayblewit

Love Music / Love Life
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Messages
2,952
Reaction score
2,252
Location
Melbourne Australia
Playing ACMP on Yamaha E models and S models.

Please try this and report back . .

Play a C+ chord (left hand)
C1 E1 and G#1
That is a Caug (C+) chord.

Now play inversion . .
C2 E2 and G#1
What do you get?

I get Ab+

I prefer to play inversion chords because they use less petrol in finger displacement.
Why does this inversion not work properly?
What other inversion chords are wrong?

R
 
Last edited:

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
13,810
Reaction score
5,555
Location
GTA, Canada
Because that's what happens when you allow a machine to play a chord for you :D

Clearly a bug.

Contact support and grow old and die waiting for a fix :D

Gary ;)
 
Joined
Jun 27, 2014
Messages
1,955
Reaction score
1,911
Location
Adelaide, Australia
Playing ACMP on Yamaha E models and S models.

Please try this and report back . .

Play a C+ chord (left hand)
C1 E1 and G#1
That is a Caug (C+) chord.

Now play inversion . .
C2 E2 and G#1
What do you get?

I get Ab+

I prefer to play inversion chords because they use less petrol in finger displacement.
Why does this inversion not work properly?
What other inversion chords are wrong?

R

Hey Ray,

The machine is not faulty. Ab aug and C aug contain the same notes. The machine is just making a different nomenclature choice because by playing the inversion you are making Ab the root in its “mind”.

Normally in a case like this the label of the chord would be determined by the key signature of the song. Of course your machine won’t know that.

Hope that helps?
 
Last edited:

Rayblewit

Love Music / Love Life
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Messages
2,952
Reaction score
2,252
Location
Melbourne Australia
Hey Ray,

The machine is not faulty. Ab aug and C aug contain the same notes. The machine is just making a different nomenclature choice because by playing the inversion you are making Ab the root in its “mind”.

Normally in a case like this the label of the chord would be determined by the key signature of the song. Of course your machine won’t know that.

Hope that helps?
Yeah mate! Certainly explains it. Thanks :)
However, the inversion Ab+ does sound slightly different than the standard triad C+
The difference is very minute and hardly even noticeable. I only noticed the difference because I experimented.

The C+ chord is very common in many tunes following after a C chord. The sound transformation is a joy to hear.

C chord inversion followed by C+ inversion is so easy to play.

R
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2012
Messages
1,564
Reaction score
735
Every major chord (example, C Major or C,E,G) when moved to the first inversion (E,G,C) is an Augmented chord of its root, in this case E Min Augmented. CMaj7 when inverted is a EMin augmented. Pick any chord any follow the pattern and you always get the min equivalent. There are other consistent patterns of major/minor equivalents. They sound different because the bottom note drives the sound your ear hears and because general hearing loss of old age effects the highs more than the lows. This makes the sound difference even more prevalent.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
14,039
Messages
86,576
Members
13,141
Latest member
Kebbel

Latest Threads

Top