Guitar player - number of Keys question


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I’m a guitar player with VERY basic key skills. My goal is basic proficiency as a keyboard player in my cover band, playing basic chords, horn parts, synth parts etc. for your typical bar band cover tunes. My question is, how “limited” COULD I be if I went with 61 Keys, vs 76? I appreciate any insight and things to consider.
 
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happyrat1

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76 keys is always nice if only to have that little extra reach at the bass end. :)

88 is too heavy to gig with so 76 is a nice trade off.

Gary ;)
 
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I’m a guitar player with VERY basic key skills. My goal is basic proficiency as a keyboard player in my cover band, playing basic chords, horn parts, synth parts etc. for your typical bar band cover tunes. My question is, how “limited” COULD I be if I went with 61 Keys, vs 76? I appreciate any insight and things to consider.
Not from experience in your situation:

1) With 61 keys, you'd have 5 octaves concurrently available (between Cs, so it may feel like 4 octaves in keys of F or G), but you can likely transpose easily to address other ranges. (Or transpose the keyboard itself in its Set-up.)
You might also want to watch keytar players for the range they use. (Keytar: like the Roland AX-Edge.)

2) You might consider playing horn and synth parts on a guitar. I'm thinking of the Boss SY-1 guitar synthesizer that connects just like any effect pedal (but you'll find similar features in e.g. the multi-effect Mooer GE300). You could also use a MIDI guitar.
MIDI guitars come in two approaches (that I know of): those using the 13-pin connectors (to transfer the audio signal for each string separately) and a matching synthesizer (like Roland GR-55 or Boss SY-1000) and those that can send MIDI conventionally, like the Jamstik Studio.

3) I haven't been in a band for ages. I think that in your situation I'd try to use my V-Accordion (synthesizer in the guise of an accordion): I have the smallest button-accordion: Roland FR-1xb. Button-accordions pack a wider range in the same dimensions than piano-accordions, and they resemble guitars in the ease of playing in a different key. (One button up or down equals three frets down or up.)

I think that you'll find examples and reviews of all the above on YouTube. :)
 
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Cost, size, weight.

Lowish cost
Roland Juno DS
Korg Kross 2

Mid cost
Roland Fantom O
Korg Nautilus
Yamaha modx

Checkout the above
 
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I'm kind of in the same place you are and 61 is getting it done for me. I am playing synth pads, B3, strings, horns and limited lead stuff mostly background for guitar based music. If I need extended range I have a shift button to go up or down. If and when I get good enough to write keyboard based music I will more than likely want 76.
 

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