Korg NAUTILUS


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Interestingly, though, apparently, all the Axial sounds for the Integra 7 are compatible with the FA as well.
That's because the Axial sounds for the Integra are SuperNATURAL Synth patches, and the Integra and the FA have the same SN Synth engine. But sonically, the best thing about the Integra are all its SuperNATURAL Acoustic tones, and the FA can't be expanded with any of those. (They have brought many of them to the Fantom, though.)
 
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When is the Nautilus coming out in the US? at this rate, I might just buy the Kronos. The price point for the Nautilus leaves me rather confused. I can pick up a Korg Kronos 73 key for about the same price as the new Nautilus. The downside of the Kronos is how complicated it is, the upside is you are getting a flagship model with more inside of it!...

It's a tough one!
 
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Has anyone compared the OS of a Nautilus v Kronos?

I would be very surprised if they were not very similar.

As for availability, that depends upon Country, it took 6 months after release before some models were available.
 
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When is the Nautilus coming out in the US? at this rate, I might just buy the Kronos. The price point for the Nautilus leaves me rather confused. I can pick up a Korg Kronos 73 key for about the same price as the new Nautilus. The downside of the Kronos is how complicated it is, the upside is you are getting a flagship model with more inside of it!...

It's a tough one!
Kronos 73 is $3600, Nautilus 73 is $2400, so those price points don't seem confusing. Of course, the Kronos has been around for a while so there are plenty of used ones, but new products are never priced to compete with used ones. Or did you actually find a source for new Kronos 73 that is close to $2400?

As far as I can tell, in most ways, the Kronos is not more complicated. 90% of the Nautilus seems to be Kronos with a bunch of buttons, sliders, and knobs removed. If you just don't use those buttons, sliders, or knobs on the Kronos (you can even cover most of them up if you want!), operation will be almost identical to the Nautilus. The biggest operational difference is probably that it has arpeggiators rather than Karma. So I guess if you like to use arpeggiators, then that's one way the Nautilus could be less complicated. (I don't really know... I don't use Karma or arpeggiators on any of my boards.) Another thing that simplifies the Nautilus are the front panel octave/transpose buttons, if that's important to you.

Kronos doesn't have much more inside of it, either. It's got Karma, it's got more controls, it's got aftertouch, but the boards are fundamentally very similar.

Possibly the biggest difference is that the Kronos 73 has a hammer action, and the Nautilus 73 has a semi-weighted action. If I was specifically looking for a 73 and had narrowed it down to those two models, that could well be my deciding factor.
 
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Kronos 73 is $3600, Nautilus 73 is $2400, so those price points don't seem confusing. Of course, the Kronos has been around for a while so there are plenty of used ones, but new products are never priced to compete with used ones. Or did you actually find a source for new Kronos 73 that is close to $2400?

As far as I can tell, in most ways, the Kronos is not more complicated. 90% of the Nautilus seems to be Kronos with a bunch of buttons, sliders, and knobs removed. If you just don't use those buttons, sliders, or knobs on the Kronos (you can even cover most of them up if you want!), operation will be almost identical to the Nautilus. The biggest operational difference is probably that it has arpeggiators rather than Karma. So I guess if you like to use arpeggiators, then that's one way the Nautilus could be less complicated. (I don't really know... I don't use Karma or arpeggiators on any of my boards.) Another thing that simplifies the Nautilus are the front panel octave/transpose buttons, if that's important to you.

Kronos doesn't have much more inside of it, either. It's got Karma, it's got more controls, it's got aftertouch, but the boards are fundamentally very similar.

Possibly the biggest difference is that the Kronos 73 has a hammer action, and the Nautilus 73 has a semi-weighted action. If I was specifically looking for a 73 and had narrowed it down to those two models, that could well be my deciding factor.


Great advice as always!... Yes, I was slightly unfair in my price comparison as I was comparing used Kronos/new Nautilus. Even though my comparison is not true on the basis of one board being used and the other new it still holds true to my particular situation and many others who would realize that they could get a flagship board used for the same price as a somewhat inferior board all be it new!

I have seen a few "open box"/demo Kronos 73's for $2400 - $2700

The touch however is another matter and you are correct in what you say about that being the main deciding factor. I really want to keep my Kawai MP11se as the feel is just second to none (at least in a stage piano) so do I want a second board with piano-like keys rather than a synth-action?... Not sure.

Time is another factor for me. With the slow down of imports and exports due to the virus, I am not sure when we will see the Nautilus in the US.
 

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For exactly the same reason people buy a Yamaha Genos

For the same cash you can buy a Korg PA4X and a Korg Kross 2 or a Roland Juno DS or a Numa Compact 2x

Yamaha buyers buy yamaha to start off with and get hooked in brand and for reasons I have never been able to understand they stay with the brand.

Have you played a MODX?

If you have next time you are in a Music Store have a play of a Roland FA, if you do not find the Roland vastly superior then you are alost cause.
Hmmm, I had Kronos an Phantom, both keyboards in my Studio for couple weeks but I did return them both! Then I got a MONTAGE, the sound much superior in any aspect! I'm thinking to get the Nautilus 'couse has 16 Audio tracks beside 16 Midi tracks, you can record mics an guitar, Bass guitar, etc... on Audio tracks, use the Nautilus keyboard as a recorder. I can record my Genos and PA4x arrangers on audio tracks and add external instriments and mics on Audio tracks! I wait to the Summer NAMM show,,maybe Korg or Yamaha will have replacement for Montage, respective Kronos keyboards!
 
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Hmmm, I had Kronos an Phantom, both keyboards in my Studio for couple weeks but I did return them both! Then I got a MONTAGE, the sound much superior in any aspect! I'm thinking to get the Nautilus 'couse has 16 Audio tracks beside 16 Midi tracks, you can record mics an guitar, Bass guitar, etc... on Audio tracks, use the Nautilus keyboard as a recorder.
Kronos can do all that same recording stuff. If you didn't like the Kronos, I'm not sure you'd care for a Nautilus which is, in most respects, just a scaled down Kronos (though with some new sounds, and a more typical kind of arpeggiator instead of Karma).

Have you played a MODX?

If you have next time you are in a Music Store have a play of a Roland FA, if you do not find the Roland vastly superior then you are alost cause.
I really disagree with that. Each has some notable advantages over the other (see post #74 in this thread). Expanding on what I said there, I mentioned that I think the MODX sounds better for most acoustic instruments. Technically, this is probably why:

The vast majority of non-synth sounds you'll hear when you play the FA in a music store (all but the small handful of "SuperNATURAL Acoustic" tones) are from the 20+ year old 64 mb soundset of the XV-5080 (though you can also add 128 mb of SRX-based sounds). By comparison, the MODX has a 5.67 GB soundset out of the box (plus a gigabyte of space for user or 3rd-party samples). And those Roland sampled sounds are limited to a max of 4 samples per key (layered, or velocity switched) whereas on the Yamaha, it's up to 8 samples per key for a single part sound, and you can go beyond that using multi-part sounds, and you can also assign some of those samples to function as alternate articulations in addition to the layering and velocity switching options, which I don't think you can do on the Roland. Specs like this aren't everything, there are great sounds to be found in boards that don't look so impresisve on paper, and there are certainly some very nice sounds in the Roland too, but to the extent that I think the Yamaha often sounds better, these specs probably help explain why!

Outside of sample-based sounds, it's true that the Yamaha does not include a VA synthesis engine like the Roland, but OTOH, the FA does not include an FM synthesis engine like the Yamaha.

As for those Roland SuperNATURAL Acoustic tones, as mentioned earlier, they are piano, EPs, clav, basses, acoustic guitar, and ensemble strings plus the clonewheel organ... but despite these being the more advanced Roland acoustic sounds (employing modeling), I think the Yamaha even generally sounds better for most if not all of these sounds as well. Though these things obviously can also be somewhat subjective. (e.g. not everyone agrees as to whether Roland or Yamaha pianos sound better). But I found the EPs and clonewheel organ on the FA to be particularly underwhelming, for example, and prefer those on the MODX (though MODX would not be my first choice for EP or organ either).

I also generally prefer the MODX actions, though neither series has top-notch actions.

FA is by no means a bad board, but there's no way I'd consider anyone who didn't find it "vastly superior" to the MODX to be a lost cause!
 
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Nautilus 61 £1950
Kronos 61 £2350

No contest, Kronos all the way at current ptice levels.

I would expect the cost of the Nautilus to drop to about £1750 in a year or so.
I was wrong.

The Korg Nautilus 61 is not now on sale at £1750, it is down to £1630.

That is quite a price cut over its launch price.
 
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hello ,please can anybody tell me how can i save a song made on the sequencer of the korg Nautilus to an external media as wave file or mp3 file ..????
THANK YOU IN ADVANCE .....
 
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Welcome

Page 216 of the English manual describes your needs.

For everything else the Manual is very comprehensive.

There are also Korg’s Video Manual series that shows you the basics.
 
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MODX has two engines, which are roughly equivalent to Korg's HD-1 and MOD-7 engines, it has no equivalent to the other 7 engines (no VA synthesis, no clonewheel organ engine, no other modeling, no multi-gigabyte streaming pianos).

MODX has seamless sound switching for sound sets of up to 4 parts at a time; Korg has seamless switching for sound sets of up to 16 parts at a time.

MODX supports up to 8 internal parts with fixed MIDI assignment; Korg supports up to 16 internal parts with flexible MIDI assignment.

MODX has limited functionality sequencer, Korg has full functionality sequencer.

MODX supports up to 8 external MIDI zones, Korg supports up to 16.

MODX permits 1 GB of additional third-party or user sample data, Korg supports much more (streaming samples from SSD).

MODX supports a max of two insert effects per part. Korg lets you reassign effects from parts that don't need them to put more effects on the parts where you want them.

Korg has balanced outs and internal power supply, both missing from MODX.

So those are some possible reasons. ;-)
I'd like to see a Nautilus without the Audio recording and sampling. The drum and sequencer functions look very intriguing for songwriters, but most of us have DAWs so the recording features are not necessary.
 
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I'd like to see a Nautilus without the Audio recording and sampling. The drum and sequencer functions look very intriguing for songwriters, but most of us have DAWs so the recording features are not necessary.

Kind of a damned if you do, damned if you don't world out there. Yamaha has gotten a lot of flack for making that kind of shift when they moved from the Motif series to the Montage/MODX, they took out a lot of the sequencing workstation stuff, figuring that now people would just use DAWs (and unlike Korg, they actually offer their own DAW, Cubase, which might have been a factor there). Roland, likewise, omitted some of these kinds of features when they came out with the new Fantom, and people complained there, too.

Who knows what it actually adds to the cost of Nautilus to keep those features in. But for people who prefer to do all their composition in the box, Nautilus/Kronos did have a unique advantage, when it comes to audio tracks, of having the high capacity afforded to them by virtue of having the SSD. So I guess they continue to see this as a selling point and unique competitive advantage.
 
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I'd like to see a Nautilus without the Audio recording and sampling. The drum and sequencer functions look very intriguing for songwriters, but most of us have DAWs so the recording features are not necessary.
It is a common feature in all Korg Workstations and arrangers, there is no need to use it if one chooses to record direct into a DAW.

That said the recording features do tend to be superior to those offered by the competition with the limit that some keyboards only record to MP3.
 

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