Yamaha CVP-303 Longevity Concern

Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Piano-keyboard ignoramus here.

A Yamaha CVP-303 has come up for sale locally.

My concern is how long can one expect the clavinova to last considering it will be around 20 years old... being manufactured 2004, if I'm not mistaken.

And if something does go wrong, how realistic is it for a repair to be made?

I appreciate that this is a 'how long is a piece of string' kind of question.

Thoughts welcome.
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
13,885
Reaction score
5,581
Location
GTA, Canada
Personally if I expect to get my money's worth from a used keyboard, I won't touch anything older than 5 years old.

After 10, you start looking at repairs, some simple, mostly expensive.
 

Rayblewit

Love Music / Love Life
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Messages
2,986
Reaction score
2,261
Location
Melbourne Australia
Piano-keyboard ignoramus here.
If you are buying for your daughter, then you need to know her intentions before buying on impulse.
Is she a novice?
Does she have playing experience?
Does she want to play piano or ACMP style.
Classical or Pop or Jazz etc..

A new keyboard could be a better choice rather than a used model.
Some new models are reasonably priced and have warranties.
It depends on her needs, desires and ability.

Cheers
 
Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
59
Reaction score
11
Location
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
Piano-keyboard ignoramus here.

A Yamaha CVP-303 has come up for sale locally.

My concern is how long can one expect the clavinova to last considering it will be around 20 years old... being manufactured 2004, if I'm not mistaken.

And if something does go wrong, how realistic is it for a repair to be made?

I appreciate that this is a 'how long is a piece of string' kind of question.

Thoughts welcome.
In my experience, it depends to a certain extent on how the instrument has been used in the past. Keyboards can be dodgy due to the fact that they are portable, so could have suffered from rough handling. The CVP-303 is more likely to have been treated as a piece of furniture and probable less likely to have been abused.

If buying privately, you can often get an idea about how it's history and of course, trying it out in person will usually let you know if there are any defects. That being said, I've bought keyboards, pianos and organs in the past that were either non-working or had faults, only because they were being sold at bargain prices and I was willing to take a chance on being able to fix them - 100% success rate so far.

One example was a Yamaha CP300 stage piano that had either been dropped or 'attacked' as the front rail (mild steel) had quite a dent in it and was jamming 7 of the white keys. Another two had dropped and one was obviously broken. I got it for $100, opened it up and removed and straightened the rail. The two dropped keys only needed reset and the broken one cost me $10, including shipping. It now works perfectly although the front rail is not quite as new.

So, if you are able and willing to take on repairs if needed, I would definitely consider buying the CVP-303 if the price is right. It's also worth trying to haggle a bit due to it's age and condition. Good luck!

Al
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
13,885
Reaction score
5,581
Location
GTA, Canada
After 20 years you're looking at soldering work.

At that point the electrolytics are either leaking or bound to start leaking any day now.
 
Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
59
Reaction score
11
Location
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
Possibly, and that might put some folks off but personally, I can deal with it. I just replaced 84 SMD capacitors on my Yamaha AR-100 organ after it started crackling. $34 from Mouser Electronics + quite a few manhours.
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
13,885
Reaction score
5,581
Location
GTA, Canada
The guy started the conversation with "Piano-keyboard ignoramus here."

I doubt he's willing to take a screw gun and a soldering iron to it right out of the box.

Stop bragging :p. ;)
 
Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
59
Reaction score
11
Location
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
The guy started the conversation with "Piano-keyboard ignoramus here."

I doubt he's willing to take a screw gun and a soldering iron to it right out of the box.

Stop bragging :p. ;)
I assumed he meant that he was not familiar with pianos or keyboards but that doesn't reveal anything about his repair capablilities.

No bragging intended - just wanted to show that there are alternatives to sticking to instruments that are less than 5 years old. While it is wise to consider the possiblity of faults developing, it is definitely not a given fact that every older piano / keyboard is going to have issues. Most of my current instruments are at least 15 years old and only a couple have had need of repair, although I've sold a good few more that I fixed. He asked for 'thoughts' - you gave your's and I gave mine.

🤗🙂
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
If you are buying for your daughter, then you need to know her intentions before buying on impulse.
Is she a novice?
Does she have playing experience?
Does she want to play piano or ACMP style.
Classical or Pop or Jazz etc..

A new keyboard could be a better choice rather than a used model.
Some new models are reasonably priced and have warranties.
It depends on her needs, desires and ability.

Cheers
Thanks for your input.

Since posting, I have concluded that it will be best to let my daughter decide.

Originally, I wanted a full size digital piano in place until her replacement piano is tuned.

She already has a basic Yamaha E353 keyboard. Maybe that will do for now.
No need to be hasty.

Best wishes
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
In my experience, it depends to a certain extent on how the instrument has been used in the past. Keyboards can be dodgy due to the fact that they are portable, so could have suffered from rough handling. The CVP-303 is more likely to have been treated as a piece of furniture and probable less likely to have been abused.

If buying privately, you can often get an idea about how it's history and of course, trying it out in person will usually let you know if there are any defects. That being said, I've bought keyboards, pianos and organs in the past that were either non-working or had faults, only because they were being sold at bargain prices and I was willing to take a chance on being able to fix them - 100% success rate so far.

One example was a Yamaha CP300 stage piano that had either been dropped or 'attacked' as the front rail (mild steel) had quite a dent in it and was jamming 7 of the white keys. Another two had dropped and one was obviously broken. I got it for $100, opened it up and removed and straightened the rail. The two dropped keys only needed reset and the broken one cost me $10, including shipping. It now works perfectly although the front rail is not quite as new.

So, if you are able and willing to take on repairs if needed, I would definitely consider buying the CVP-303 if the price is right. It's also worth trying to haggle a bit due to it's age and condition. Good luck!

Al
Thanks. That's helpful.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
The guy started the conversation with "Piano-keyboard ignoramus here."

I doubt he's willing to take a screw gun and a soldering iron to it right out of the box.

Stop bragging :p. ;)

I am an ignoramus but can be resourceful when I put my mind to it :D

Although, you are right, I am definitely going more for convenience and cannot see myself investing in a soldering iron any time soon.

All perspectives appreciated. Thanks for your contribution.
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2022
Messages
5
Reaction score
2
Piano-keyboard ignoramus here.

A Yamaha CVP-303 has come up for sale locally.

My concern is how long can one expect the clavinova to last considering it will be around 20 years old... being manufactured 2004, if I'm not mistaken.

And if something does go wrong, how realistic is it for a repair to be made?

I appreciate that this is a 'how long is a piece of string' kind of question.

Thoughts welcome.
Like anything used, it depends upon how well it's been kept clean. I had an old CVP clavinova bought back in the 90's. Kept it clean, sold and still working, but I kept it clean and covered when not in use. Sold it for $250 over 10 years ago. There are techs that will service these and they'll make you aware early on if parts are no longer available. So, I think you have to do some research and reflect on the cost. I now have a DGX-670. Bought two years+ ago, and love it. Cost was $850 at the time. Much better than anything else on the market for the price and much more user friendly.
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
13
Location
Toronto, Canada
Piano-keyboard ignoramus here.

A Yamaha CVP-303 has come up for sale locally.

My concern is how long can one expect the clavinova to last considering it will be around 20 years old... being manufactured 2004, if I'm not mistaken.

And if something does go wrong, how realistic is it for a repair to be made?

I appreciate that this is a 'how long is a piece of string' kind of question.

Thoughts welcome.

Try before you buy, of course. Or ask for a video, testing every key, with different velocities.
Some home keyboards last for decades with no issues, but get a good visual on it to see how well it's been taken care of.
I have an expensive synth from the 80s that was on the road with me for a while, and it hasn't needed anything, including a battery.
Best of luck!
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Try before you buy, of course. Or ask for a video, testing every key, with different velocities.
Some home keyboards last for decades with no issues, but get a good visual on it to see how well it's been taken care of.
I have an expensive synth from the 80s that was on the road with me for a while, and it hasn't needed anything, including a battery.
Best of luck!
Very helpful. Thanks.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Like anything used, it depends upon how well it's been kept clean. I had an old CVP clavinova bought back in the 90's. Kept it clean, sold and still working, but I kept it clean and covered when not in use. Sold it for $250 over 10 years ago. There are techs that will service these and they'll make you aware early on if parts are no longer available. So, I think you have to do some research and reflect on the cost. I now have a DGX-670. Bought two years+ ago, and love it. Cost was $850 at the time. Much better than anything else on the market for the price and much more user friendly.
A good point. Cheers.
 

happyrat1

Destroyer of Eardrums!!!
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
13,885
Reaction score
5,581
Location
GTA, Canada
I still say he should take a pass and buy his daughter a newer piece of prosumer gear.

If we had a budget to work with we could make specific recommendations.

She currently has a PSR-E343.

He is wisest leaving the final decision to her.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
I still say he should take a pass and buy his daughter a newer piece of prosumer gear.

If we had a budget to work with we could make specific recommendations.

She currently has a PSR-E343.

He is wisest leaving the final decision to her.
Regarding keyboards, I've narrowed it down to recommending my daughter choose between Yamaha NP-35, Roland Go 88, and Korg Liano L1. We'll see.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
14,110
Messages
87,209
Members
13,174
Latest member
sfz5

Latest Threads

Top