Casio wav recorder compared to average computer


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I'll be doing some of my initial recording on my Casio 7500. How good is that recording facility compared to that on an "average" Windows computer system with regard to :
  • Distortion/noise level
  • Frequency response
  • Glitch-freeness (technical term) Referring to free of hangups, pops and clicks that may occur with a too slow processor
  • Ease of use
  • Flexibility
I understand that comparing to an "average" computer lacks specificity. I am using a 2 year old 4 gig HP Pavillion DM1 laptop with a slower than current average processor. Oh, and let's assume that only two tracks are being recorded.

I'm guessing greater flexibility can be had with dedicated computer-based recording software as well as more accessible controls. But overall, how does the 7500's recording abilities compare to computer-based recording?
 
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happyrat1

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Your computer should be fine for recording. The only thing you might have issues with is latency but if you google "solving midi latency issues" you'll find solutions and tips for fixing your system.
 
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Your computer should be fine for recording. The only thing you might have issues with is latency but if you google "solving midi latency issues" you'll find solutions and tips for fixing your system.
I understand the computer works for recording. I was wondering if anyone can describe the difference in performance, clarity, ease, flexibility, overall sound between using the computer and using the Casio 7500 recording function.
 
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Mozartian

In general, pops and clicks in the recorded output are usually attributable to latency problems associated with incorrect buffer sizes. Since keyboards are essentially very low or zero latency devices, they are usually free of these problems. If you are talking about the WK-7500 specifically, some users have reported the D/A - A/D converter hash associated with economically designed converters. Some say they hear it all the time - in both live and recorded output, but mine only exhibits it in the recorded output. Most up-to-date computers and professional quality audio interfaces do not seem to exhibit this problem. Of course, the higher end keyboards don't exhibit it either. Any electronic device can suffer from lock-ups, but in general, this is the domain of the PC. As far as ease of use, this appears to be subjective in accordance with what you are used to. Those with experience recording to PC's swear by it and would consider recording directly to a keyboard far too limiting, while those who regularly record to keyboards would probably find recording to a PC way too complicated. Those with expertise in both and have little or no preference seem to be very rare, in deed.
 
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Thanks, Ted. Yes, its all in what we get used to. Good points. As it turns out I may not do all that much recording at home anyway since my wife made clear her "noise averse" feelings about a recording studio in the garage. Last night I ordered a Tascam DR-40 recorder for remote recording of practice session I can conduct elsewhere either alone or with several of our ensemble peeps. Then I can integrate and mix tracks with the keyboard using headphones later.
 

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