Hendrix chord


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How big are your hands? You're stretching from a A to C. If you can make that stretch (most can't) then it is one note per finger. Assuming that you can't then play the A7 (four notes) in one hand and the 9# (the C) with the right hand or play the A chord in the left hand and the 7th and the #9 in the other hand. It's used in the song Black Cow (Steely Dan) and I use two hands to pull it off.
 
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Dave is spot on correct

I have pretty large hands and it is impossible for me to finger single handed.

I can play keys C4 and D5 together but A C# E G B# is a note to far.

Even using inversions and trying to span C & C# with my thumb I cannot make it with just one hand.

If one likes inflicting self pain then I suppose keep trying to play it could be a good stretching exercise for the hands.
 
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Yes, it becomes very Bluesey and it was used to great effect by Jimi Hendrix in Purple Haze and is why the chord bears his name

Or rather he used E7#9 in the song which on a guitar with the fretting he used gives E E G# D G E and if we transpose that to A for continuity in the thread we have A A C# G C A which is a little different to what we have on a keyboard chord chart

Read more on Hendrix’s use of the chord on Fender’s website


Why not try playing A7+9 with different fingering and two hands.

Then try fingering G A C C# E one handed with a Strat Guitar voice with plenty of fuzz
 

Rayblewit

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Thanks Col,
I appreciate that.
I often substitute weird chords for standard chords and the sound is barely different.
Especially if only for one or two bars; eg D7 instead of D13. (can hardly pick the difference)
But in the case of Hendrix's unique sound . . maybe not!
cheers
Ray
 
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It would be interesting to read what Paul has to say as I understand the 7+9 chords frequently occur in Pink Floyd music.

Sorry in advance Paul if I am wrong on this.
 
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This clip is directly relevant to OP's question:


Col, WRT to Pink Floyd, I've not really noticed a prevalence of #9 chords. I will say that Richard Wright was a fan of (dominant) 9th chords here and there generally though. You can hear him using 9ths quite a bit in his piano comping and soloing and off the top of my head Great Gig in the Sky's main motif is Gm7 to C9. I have to think hard about this stuff because I've played these songs so often they've become muscle memory and I don't think about the chord structures that underpin them after they're embedded in my DNA!
 

Rayblewit

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A C# E G B#
Col,
This relates to A7b9 according to my keyboard.
So I tried C# GAB. The screen on my KB says it is A7+9

Easy with one hand . . Pinky on C#1 Pointer finger and Thumb play the other 3 consecutive G1,A1,B1.

Not such a stretch.

Ray
 
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Hey Ray,

I recommend you watch that video I posted which will explain why Col's description of A7#9 is correct.

The chord voicing you have described could be a version of A9, or A dominant 9, minus the fifth degree (E).
 
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Yes it can be played one handed but to my thinking that then ceases to the The Hendrix Chord, it just becomes A7+9 (or a subtle variation).

Guitars are tuned in 4ths with strings tuned E A D G B E (thickest to thinest).

When Hendrix played the chord which now bears his name he picked the strings E E G# D G E, but it is how he sounded the chord that is interesting.

Looking at a rather old a grainy video he play the low E whilst already having fingered the four centre strings which will cause all strings to resonate.

Then there is a slight pause before he picks all six strings strumming down from Low E to High E, now the action of strumming does not sound the strings at the same time there is a slight time difference between picking each string.

Do take note that Hendrix played E E G# D G E with the four central strings fingered.

So to my minds eye a keyboard player needs to replicate Hendrix to play the Hendrix chord, if they cannot then it is not a Hendrix chord.
 
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Rayblewit

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I recommend you watch that video I posted
I did.

But it doesn't really answer the OP's question . .

What is the best fingering for an A7+9 chord?
What I diiscovered (above) is hardly a stretch for ONE hand allowing right hand free to play melody.
I am no expert, but the screen on my board said it was +9.

Anyway I don't care. I will never be using that chord. i will substitute it if it ever comes up and I doubt I would ever play Hendrix tunes.

But I have enjoyed the discussion and no further comment from me.

Thanks guys.
Cheers Ray
 
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Hi Ray,

I’ll have to disagree with you and your keyboard my friend.

The video I posted answers OP’s question directly. He didn’t say the fingering had to be one handed. I note it’s also the fingering suggested by DD and Col.

Your keyboard may say what you’re playing is an A7+9 (also known as A7#9). But it’s not. The #9 is a B# (or C). By playing a B instead you have turned the chord into a version of an A dominant 9 (or simply A9). One could also argue you’re playing the 2nd degree and not the 9th but that’s probably not a big deal either way and I understand your auto accompaniment will limit you a bit there.

Now you know me, I’m the least pedantic bloke going around and feel free to play whatever sounds nice to you, but A#9 and A9 are two completely different chords. For the sake of OP’s question I think that distinction is important in this case.
 
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Rayblewit

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I’ll have to disagree with you and your keyboard my friend.
No worries mate.
I have 100% faith in you.

I have no idea.
To be honest the keyboard screen told me A7 9
The nine was in smaller case and there was no #or + between A7 and 9 . . . So I just assumed.

Time I backed off. It is all too deep for me. . .

Btw . . Who can be in a worse position right now? Bombers or Crows ? (Sorry, Everyone ignore . . For Paul only) lol

Bomber Ray
 
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