PX130 problem


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Hi, I bought a 2nd hand PX130 Casio Keyboard.
The issue is that every time i turn it on i must reselect the piano, and retune it in A440. The keyboard doesn't automatically save the last selection of instrument.
It always starts with "organ" and the tune of C key starts always in Ab.
Is there a way to automatically save a new default, or at least to say "save the last option selected"?.
Thanks in advance for any kind of help.
 

Rayblewit

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When you turn on your keyboard it is responding to a pre-set program by the previous owner. (that's what I think).
You need to pre-set it your way or pre-set it to the original factory settings.
That is what I had to do with my second hand KB.
If that does not work then there probably is a fault somewhere and happyrat suggested to look at the troubleshooting info.
Good Luck
 

happyrat1

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The troubleshooting section I mentioned covers the exact problem the OP referred to.

From what I could see there is no "factory reset" setting on the PX-130.

Gary ;)
 
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Hi:
I have a Casio CD 130, just saw this question and dying to know how you get A440? There are a few keys in the first bass octave from middle C: C, Db, D, Eb, E F, F# that I can't put in tune and keep in tune. Would really appreciate getting the answer to this.

Thanks
 

Fred Coulter

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I could be wrong, but I think the A440 confusion is due to the language of the original post. When he said:
and retune it in A440. [...] the tune of C key starts always in Ab.​
he was referring to transposing the keyboard, not tuning the keyboard. Those are two different things.

Transposing the keyboard, which is common among a certain type of keyboards, will move the keyboard up or down half steps. The reason for this is that you've learned a piece in E major, but the trumpet player wants to play it in D major. So you can just transpose the keyboard two half steps. It sounds like it's in D major, but your fingers are still in E major. (It's also essential when accompanying vocalists who have to work with the limitation so their voice.)

Tuning a keyboard moves every note on the keyboard up or down a small fraction of a half step. This is designed so that the keyboard will be in tune with the other instruments in the band, and is meaningless if you're playing with yourself.

The modern standard is that the A above middle C vibrates at 440 cycles per second (or Hertz). But not all orchestras tune to that standard. In the baroque period, there was no standard. That's tuning, and from what the original poster said, that's not the issue he had at all. His problem was that the keyboard booted up in a transposed position, and he wanted it untransposed when he turned it on.

Most modern keyboards are relatively easy to transpose, with either a dedicated button or a single menu step to the transpose control. Most modern keyboards are harder to tune, with the tune command buried somewhere deep in the system settings. That's because you might want to transpose each song differently, but will generally only change the tuning at the beginning of the gig, and even then it's rare.
 
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I could be wrong, but I think the A440 confusion is due to the language of the original post. When he said:
and retune it in A440. [...] the tune of C key starts always in Ab.​
he was referring to transposing the keyboard, not tuning the keyboard. Those are two different things.

Transposing the keyboard, which is common among a certain type of keyboards, will move the keyboard up or down half steps. The reason for this is that you've learned a piece in E major, but the trumpet player wants to play it in D major. So you can just transpose the keyboard two half steps. It sounds like it's in D major, but your fingers are still in E major. (It's also essential when accompanying vocalists who have to work with the limitation so their voice.)

Tuning a keyboard moves every note on the keyboard up or down a small fraction of a half step. This is designed so that the keyboard will be in tune with the other instruments in the band, and is meaningless if you're playing with yourself.

The modern standard is that the A above middle C vibrates at 440 cycles per second (or Hertz). But not all orchestras tune to that standard. In the baroque period, there was no standard. That's tuning, and from what the original poster said, that's not the issue he had at all. His problem was that the keyboard booted up in a transposed position, and he wanted it untransposed when he turned it on.

Most modern keyboards are relatively easy to transpose, with either a dedicated button or a single menu step to the transpose control. Most modern keyboards are harder to tune, with the tune command buried somewhere deep in the system settings. That's because you might want to transpose each song differently, but will generally only change the tuning at the beginning of the gig, and even then it's rare.
Thanks, good stuff Fred. I still need to tune the bass of my CD130. From the first octave below Middle C: C through F#. It sounds awful so I try and fix it but wind up getting up and leaving it in frustration. It wasn't this bad until recently when I turned it on it was as if someone had changed the settings and now I can't reset them. I'm on the verge of throwing it out.
Appreciate your indulgence.
Janet
 

Fred Coulter

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Interesting if the bass is out of tune but the treble is not. I'm not sure that's possible on a working electronic keyboard unless the instrument allowed for changing temperament. (Temperament has to do with the distance between notes. In equal temperament, the distance between the frequency of each note and the next is the twelfth root of two.) Some higher end keyboards let you move all the notes within an octave, yet leave the octaves alone, while others let you screw around with every key on the keyboard.

From what I can tell about the CD130, that's not one of the things it can do. Which means that if the bass is out of tune with the rest of the keyboard, it may be broken. You may wish to bring it to a shop. (After using a tuner to make sure it's actually out of tune in the bass.)
 
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Back with the same problem but now I know that the settings go back to default when piano isn't used for a few days or a week. And I had tried so many things to get a decent sound that I forget them now. And this old problem is the worst of it: there are a few keys in the first bass octave down from middle C: C, Db, D, Eb, E F, F# that I can't get tuned and keep in tune. Any suggestions?

Thanks
Janet

I could be wrong, but I think the A440 confusion is due to the language of the original post. When he said:
and retune it in A440. [...] the tune of C key starts always in Ab.​
he was referring to transposing the keyboard, not tuning the keyboard. Those are two different things.

Transposing the keyboard, which is common among a certain type of keyboards, will move the keyboard up or down half steps. The reason for this is that you've learned a piece in E major, but the trumpet player wants to play it in D major. So you can just transpose the keyboard two half steps. It sounds like it's in D major, but your fingers are still in E major. (It's also essential when accompanying vocalists who have to work with the limitation so their voice.)

Tuning a keyboard moves every note on the keyboard up or down a small fraction of a half step. This is designed so that the keyboard will be in tune with the other instruments in the band, and is meaningless if you're playing with yourself.

The modern standard is that the A above middle C vibrates at 440 cycles per second (or Hertz). But not all orchestras tune to that standard. In the baroque period, there was no standard. That's tuning, and from what the original poster said, that's not the issue he had at all. His problem was that the keyboard booted up in a transposed position, and he wanted it untransposed when he turned it on.

Most modern keyboards are relatively easy to transpose, with either a dedicated button or a single menu step to the transpose control. Most modern keyboards are harder to tune, with the tune command buried somewhere deep in the system settings. That's because you might want to transpose each song differently, but will generally only change the tuning at the beginning of the gig, and even then it's rare.
 

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