Weighted keys vs Lightweighted keys


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For not all too long ago, I thought that lightweighted keys were better when playing harder stuff at higher speed, while weighted keys were better when playing piano stuff.
A few weeks ago, I noticed that the lightweighted keys made me slip much more, and I lost some of the tightness. I don't know if that was because they're lightweighted, or is there's another reason, but I've started to think more about if I should get weighted keys for my next keyboard...

If you know more about the pro's and con's of weighted/lightweighted keys, please share your knowledge :)
 
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Weighted keys are always better IMO. Hell even on acoustic pianos, I like practicing on baby grands with heavy action... not stiff or sticky, just pretty heavy. It takes a while to get used to, especially a new piano, but once I'm used to it I feel like I have a lot of control over the instrument, whether it be dynamics or sheer speed.

The only pro of non-weighted or light-weighted keys would be for organ playing, in which case you'd also need the keys to be "waterfall" keys (this allows for palm glissandos and other organ-specific techniques that I've only heard of but never done as I don't play organ, so this information is second-hand).

Get a weighted keyboard is my advice.
 
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Get away from lightweighted keys... That "I noticed that the lightweighted keys made me slip much more" is the first thing you'll notice. As you're getting better you'll want to play more complicated thing, or more expressive chords with better dynamics. You can't do that on plasticky keys.

Playing hammond-organ sounds -Yes, BUT semi-weighted. Difference between lightweighted keys and semiweighted was for me almost the same as it was when i switched from semiweighted to hammer keys.

Bottom line - if you need precision, great dynamics go for the real thing - hammer action keyboard. For everything else - semiweighted keys :)
 
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Okey, so there is an alternative between real weighted keys and lightweighted ones, didn't know that :)

So, hammer action keys are the ones that are just like on a piano? With heavier keys at the lower section, and lighter at the higher section?
And semiweighted are.... hmmm.... Same weight on all keys, and slightly lighter than the heavy ones?
Not sure if I've ever tried a semiweighted keyboard, so I don't know that much about it ^^
 
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Okey, so there is an alternative between real weighted keys and lightweighted ones, didn't know that :)

So, hammer action keys are the ones that are just like on a piano? With heavier keys at the lower section, and lighter at the higher section?
And semiweighted are.... hmmm.... Same weight on all keys, and slightly lighter than the heavy ones?
Not sure if I've ever tried a semiweighted keyboard, so I don't know that much about it ^^

Hehe... yes and no...

Hammer action keys are the "piano-ish" keys. not all keyboards have heavier keys at lower octaves. That's called graded hammer action. So as you can see there are a lot of sorts of hammer keys, but most of them are, as the name suggests) - heavy.

Now, for those "semi-weighted"... Every better workstation has those kind of keys. Triton, TR, Motif (classic, ES,XS), M3, Fantom, Trinity etc...

Although... the new motif XS has a peculiar type of keys... a bit more synth oriented... They feel a bit more rubbery then the ones on my ES but still, semi-weighted :D
 
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Always weighted keys... You will have a bad-pressing-finger on piano keys, if you always use light-weighted keys... Better you play on weighted keys, like on a real piano-key
 
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Now, for those "semi-weighted"... Every better workstation has those kind of keys. Triton, TR, Motif (classic, ES,XS), M3, Fantom, Trinity etc...

What I've seen from the workstations I've looked up (Korg M3 and Oasys), the 76 key version has semi-weighted keys, while the 88 key version has Real Weighted Hammer Action keys.
Is it possible to get i.ex an Korg M3 with 88 semi-weighted keys? Or do I need to choose between 76 semi-weighted and 88 Real Weighted?
 
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What I've seen from the workstations I've looked up (Korg M3 and Oasys), the 76 key version has semi-weighted keys, while the 88 key version has Real Weighted Hammer Action keys.
Is it possible to get i.ex an Korg M3 with 88 semi-weighted keys? Or do I need to choose between 76 semi-weighted and 88 Real Weighted?

As far as I know there are NO 88 semi-weighted keys workstations.
Every keyboard with 88 keys have hammer action/graded hammer action.

There are some yamahas in 88 keys versions but they have plain plasticky keys so run away from that :D
 
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As far as I know there are NO 88 semi-weighted keys workstations.
Every keyboard with 88 keys have hammer action/graded hammer action.

There are some yamahas in 88 keys versions but they have plain plasticky keys so run away from that :D

Ok, then I'd better just try a few semi-weighted keyboards, and a few hammer action/graded hammer action to see the difference between them. I probably won't buy anything in a few years anyways, so I've got time to think abd try the different alternatives, so I get something I will be really satisfied with :)

Thanks for the help :)
 
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For not all too long ago, I thought that lightweighted keys were better when playing harder stuff at higher speed, while weighted keys were better when playing piano stuff.
A few weeks ago, I noticed that the lightweighted keys made me slip much more, and I lost some of the tightness. I don't know if that was because they're lightweighted, or is there's another reason, but I've started to think more about if I should get weighted keys for my next keyboard...

If you know more about the pro's and con's of weighted/lightweighted keys, please share your knowledge :)

There is a difference between weighted keys and the action of keys. What is the purpose of your keyboard? If you are trying to learn to play piano, you want a keyboard that feels as much like a piano as possible, which means weighted keys.

I use to like really old pianos because the keys would move fast. But then I had the opportunity to play on a very nice concert Steinway and discovered that it is the action that I love, not the flimsy keys. Weighted keys give you more depth and dynamics, which makes the music more than just a bunch of notes. You need this no matter how fast you play. Keyboards usually have great action. If you are improving as a pianist, you will want a keyboard that feels like an acoustic. The nice thing about keyboards is they can feel like the quality concert grand for just a fraction of the cost.
 
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What you feel with weighted keys is inertia. An acoustic piano has a lot happen as its "action" is played. When you watch as the back of the key contacts the whippen, a complex mechanical device made of wood, used to accelerate the hammer then let loose just before hammer/string contact, you wonder how anyone could figure this ingenious device out! But it works and works well changing force at the key to inertia at the hammer with let-off at precisely the right time.

Pretty tough to exactly replicate the complete action feel. I've heard that the Kawai stage pianos come awfully close. My daughter has one, plays it a lot for her own enjoyment and prefers it to an acoustic piano even though her home is huge and her income high. It requires no periodic tuning or maintenance and her 5 year old son can bang away to his heart's content with no undesirable effect or damage. With headphones, the piano is silenced which makes for peace between father, mother and son.

Under the hood, each key has a whippen, of sorts, which gives a reasonably accurate touch. The downside is that it is more expensive than other pianos in its class and weighs quite a bit more. If I were a piano player, rather than an organ player, I'd certainly look into it.

Loren
 
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I would say that it depends on the type of runs you're doing. Having played piano and keyboard for many years, I think I prefer each at different times. If you're playing more chord-based music, or arpeggios, then weighted keys usually give a better haptic experience. Though, with keytar, I usually play much faster solos, and semi-weighted keys seem to 'snap back' faster, allowing me to rapidly play the same note (much faster than with weighted keys).
 
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I agree with the notion that you should play *real* fully-weighted actions (i.e, good ole' acoustic action, preferably a grand action) as much as possible so as not to lose your touch. Having said that, I play a so-called "fully-weighted" Nord Stage 2 every weekend on stage, but it's not the same as fully mechanical action of an acoustic. If I am away from that for too long, I find I have to work to get my touch back.
 

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