Yamaha recommendation.


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Hi all, a few months ago I purchased a Yamaha PSR E360 as a beginner instrument
Which I have been pleased with but as it is a 61 key the middle C is off to one side and I find it a wee bit awkward. Had I known I would have purchased a 76 key and it is on this instrument I need advice on buying. I would like the the same specifications with nothing fancy like pitch benders.
Basically I want the same spec with a 76 keyboard if that I possible.
I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the above.
Regards.
 
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nothing fancy like pitch benders.
Since boards are not custom designed for every possible buyer, it is challenging enough to find something that has everything someone wants... I wouldn't worry about the possibility that it might also have some stuff you don't care about. That will pretty much always be the case.

That said, if you're looking for something similar to a PSR E360, the 76-key keyboards of the same general type which Yamaha makes are the PSR-EW300 and the PSR-EW410. I have no personal experience with any of these.
 
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Appreciate your reply and you are quite right in saying I shouldn’t be concerned about the keyboard having more than I need as long a it has what I want. I will have a look at your suggestions this evening.
Thanks.
 
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Are you aware that even with a 76 or 88 key instrument middle C (C4) is going to be located pretty much in the middle of the keybed?

I have just measured my 73 key Yamaha and the exact centre key is E4.

Unless that is, you press the Octave shift, which you can anyway with most Arrangers even the 61 key ones.

In the Arranger market you are really limited to 61 keys except for the models Scott has mentioned, unless you have megabucks to spend on a top of the line Korg PA4X 76 or Yamaha Genos 76.

I think that Kursweil may also make an Arranger type keyboard with more than 61 keys but they are not a well marketed product here in the UK.

With a more advanced Arranger you can assign where the split point is and assign the octave range of each side of the split.

Good luck with your
 
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SeaGtGruff

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as it is a 61 key the middle C is off to one side and I find it a wee bit awkward.
As far as I know, the only keyboard where Middle C is exactly in the middle would be a 49-note C-to-C keyboard, and those are even more awkward to play than a 61-note keyboard (in my opinion). But yes, Middle C isn't as far from the middle on an 88-note A-to-C keyboard, or on a 76-note E-to-G keyboard.

Basically I want the same spec with a 76 keyboard if that I possible.
The closest 76-note keyboard with the same specs would be the PSR-EW300, which is the 76-note version of the PSR-E363. The PSR-E360 is (in my opinion) like a cross between a PSR-E263 and a PSR-E363, so the PSR-EW300 has better specs than the PSR-E360 does, but less so than the PSR-EW410 does.
 

happyrat1

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As long as he's spending money on an upgrade why not point him at a few other, better brands to upgrade to?

The Casio WK-7600 and the entire WK series comes to mind.

Or if he wants better quality instruments than video game sounds, how about the Roland Juno DS76 and DS88.

If you're serious enough to want to upgrade your instrument why not buy something of professional quality?

Gary ;)
 
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happyrat1

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And if he's concerned with Middle C lining up with his belly button all he has to do is move his stool 4 inches to the left :D :D :D

Gary ;)
 

SeaGtGruff

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Based on the cost of the PSR-E360, I'm guessing the OP might not be able to afford something like the WK-7600 or Juno-DS88.

Also, I'm guessing the awkwardness of playing a 61-note keyboard might come more from having only 2 octaves to the left of Middle C than from not being able to park one's bum at the exact center of the keyboard. :D
 

happyrat1

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I'm not trying to second guess anyone here including the original poster.

All I'm doing is giving him options he may not have realized that he had.

What I did gather from his post is that he's outgrown his first keyboard and feels the motivation to upgrade. Regardless of whatever baby steps he may take.

At any rate, how about we wait for the OP to respond before jumping down my throat for having the audacity to recommend something other than a Yamaha?

I'd expect this kind of fanboy reaction if I were to post this over on a Yamaha Forum but I thought we were keyboard brand agnositc over here?

Gary ;)
 
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Rayblewit

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Middle C is about where it is positioned between the two staffs (treble and bass) . It is dead set middle between the two.
It matters not where it is located on the keybed. Middle C does not mean middle of keyboard. Duh!
 
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This is for Dick’s benefit.

Yamaha are the world leaders in keyboards aimed at the beginner market. There is something like 12 different models to choose from, all similar and all with an extensive range if features.

Casio are the next most populous manufacturer in the beginner segment.

Other manufacturers like Korg and Roland only have token models to choose from and as far as Korg is concerned the EK50 is an excellent keyboard but considerably more expensive for a beginner but this is not really aimed at the beginner market.

With Yamaha flooding the beginner market they get owners indoctrinated into the wonderful world of Yamaha and owners frequently seem to fail to look outside the brand as they upgrade their keyboards.

I have seen it myself in Music Stores where people have bought a Yamaha when there is another much superior model which is a similar priced keyboard by a different manufacturer readily available.

The Yamaha E series are the first steps, but pretty soon they can be outgrown and going from an E3 series to a E4 series keyboard, which the EW410 essentially is, will not necessarily offer a route for effective advancement of ones keyboard skills.

The next rung up the ladder is the Yamaha S or SX series which are limited to 61 keys but the principle advantage is an increase in the quality of the onboard sounds (especially with the much newer SX models) and the features which you indicate are not that important.

If features are not important then can I suggest that you consider a digital piano a Yamaha NP12 or P125, then you can have the full gamut of 88 keys, the ability to split the keyboard to have different instrument voices each side of the split.

The concern that I have is that you buy what is the most appropriate keyboard for you and not a keyboard that is a knee jerk reaction to a feature you do not like in your E360.

If you can explain some more about what and how you want to play, the direction you want to head with your skills etc then we can offer more constructive advice.
 
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Thank you everybody who has replied to my post. I am trying to take on board all your ideas and suggestions. You have certainly given me plenty to think over,
I will let you know what I decide.
Regards, Dick,
 

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