Which speakers/amp to buy?

Discussion in 'Yamaha Keyboards' started by Jon Yoder., Apr 17, 2018.

  1. Jon Yoder.

    Jon Yoder.

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    Hi guys. I’m new to the forum. Just recently I bought a new Yamaha DGX 660 and would like to get a couple of speakers for it. I have it set up next to my grand piano in my house and would like to have more volume. I’m not looking for something to blow the windows out but would like it louder than the built in speakers. I understand I have to use the headphones jack. Does that mean I can only have it hooked up to one external speaker? What’s the best way to get good stereo sound out of it with at least 2 speakers? Does it need an amp between the piano and speakers or some kind of splitter? I appreciate any help I can get. Thanks! Jon.
     
    Jon Yoder., Apr 17, 2018
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  2. Jon Yoder.

    Biggles

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    Just looked at the spec and connectivity is very limited with only the headphone socket being an output so yes this is the way to go.

    You can buy splitters off the likes of Amazon that have a stereo jack the the lead splits into two mono jacks that are left and right channels.

    The problem with using the headphones output is that the signal strength may not be of a sufficient level for the powered speakers.

    Thats not to say its a deal breaker as my Behringer B108 are powerful and have a gain control so something like this may do the job, alternatively a mixer between the keyboard and powered speakers would have a gain control again Behringer Xenyx 1002 and Mackie powered speakers could works.

    I am sure others will be along shortly, there is always a solution.
     
    Biggles, Apr 17, 2018
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  3. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    Actually powered speakers and external amps expect line level outputs.

    Headphone outs are normally too powerful and overdrive the line inputs of amps and blow them out.

    However, Yamaha designed the DGX series around this fact and included a setting in the menus that switches the headphone outs to line levels.

    Be certain you've applied this setting before hooking up the speakers.

    I'd recommend a set of these edifier speakers from Amazon for decent sound at a decent price.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=edifier powered speakers

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Apr 17, 2018
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  4. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    BTW, the headphone jack on most electronic appliances is stereo out. It uses a 3 connector plug called TRS. The edifier speakers come with a cable that feeds from TRS IN to RCA OUTs to connect to the speakers. The only other connector you might need is a 1/4" to 1/8" TRS Adapter plug to fit the connection on the DGX.

    One of these should work fine.

    https://www.amazon.com/UGREEN-6-35mm-Female-Stereo-Adapter/dp/B01D82XXGO/

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Apr 17, 2018
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  5. Jon Yoder.

    Jon Yoder.

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    Gary, thanks for the detailed info!! I appreciate it.
     
    Jon Yoder., Apr 26, 2018
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  6. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    You're very welcome Jon.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Apr 26, 2018
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  7. Jon Yoder.

    GeraldR

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    You can use a stereo to dual mono patch cord so that you can plug into any typical musical instrument amps; as mentioned, set the output parameter for line (as opposed to headphone) output. Also, some sound system amps are set up for stereo amplification with a stereo input and a line relay output so you plug from keys to amp and amp to second amp. You didn't say how loud is loud enough :). I use two Yamaha MS150s at home and in small spaces (easy to carry). I also have a Peavey keyboard amp which is louder but IMHO not very clean. I also have some medium size 'Voice of the Theater' clones capable of over 120 dB but don't use them much (certainly not at home where they once caused quite a contretemps).
     
    GeraldR, May 3, 2018
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  8. Jon Yoder.

    Faruk

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    Hi, did you buy an amp for your keyboard? which one did you buy and how is the sound volume? i am thinking to buy one too.
     
    Faruk, Jun 17, 2018
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  9. Jon Yoder.

    GeraldR

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    This is old and things change. The DGX-660 has 6W per channel internal amplification so (obviously) you would want more watts but the main thing is more bass / physically larger speakers. There is a function parameter to set the headphone output to line level. You can use any good quality amplification: so called keyboard amps are really full range instrument amps (20Hz - 20 kHz or better) and often have an equalizer function. There are so-called mixing amps which just combine both channels into a mono amp and some that are actually stereo in a single box but that seems a bit of a kludge as compared to two physically separate speaker cabinets. Your Yamaha keyboard does make some use of stereo effects. You can use a stereo amp head or two separate amps with a stereo breakout cable or amps with a 'stereo link' feature that allows one amp to be daisy-chained from another. The main thing other than power is good low end frequency response (bigger speakers, possibly 15") and excellent fidelity. With the general swing to synth away from guitar, there are quite few options from keyboard manufacturers such as Roland and Korg and sound reinforcement companies such as Behringer; however, the best sound I ever got was from a DC-coupled component stereo amp connected to Klipschhorn cabinets.
     
    GeraldR, Jun 17, 2018
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  10. Jon Yoder.

    Dino

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    DOes any of You know which PA / Loudspeaker set / Monitors to use with the MOXF8? I have a LUcas Nano 300 but the acoustic grand piano sounds like it is coming from a tin can on that PA.

    I have no idea which loudspeakers / pa /monitors (likely all of those combined) would honour the supposingly great Grand piano sound by Yamaha.

    ANy idea. Let's say I am on a budget but need a tolerable sound that inspires one to play at all.

    Also I like it to be held on poles / a rack like the Lucas Nano is.

    REgards
    D
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
    Dino, Jul 8, 2018
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  11. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    First a couple of questions.

    1) How much of a budget?

    2) Home use or gigging?

    3) If gigging, how large a venue?

    To tell the truth in order to get a realistic sounding piano out of a keyboard the minimum you should have is a decent set of nearfield monitors and a subwoofer in a 2.1 configuration. At least in a studio or home studio setup. As for price? It can be done for as little as a couple of hundred or you can spend thousands.

    One of the cheapest options that works pretty well is to get a set of decent 2.1 computer speakers and kludge the cabling with the proper adapters and you can have a kickass sound for about $150.

    As stated above, all these signals are line level compatible and will work just fine in a pinch.

    Here's a hypotheitcal 2.1 computer setup and the cabling you'd need.

    https://www.amazon.com/yueton-3-5mm-Stereo-Female-Adapter/dp/B0156F38LG/

    https://www.amazon.com/WOVTE-Stereo-Jack-6-35mm-Adaptor/dp/B01045Z3AM/

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_...refix=2.1+,electronics,193&crid=3GGD41RERYRDM


    Gary ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
    happyrat1, Jul 8, 2018
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  12. Jon Yoder.

    Dino

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    Hi Gary,
    1) The sound quality is the most important point of reference. On the DGX660 yamaha that we owned before, the sound of the acoustic pianos was excellent. The cones were rather large considering just 6w each. Not too expensive but a good sound is important.

    2) Mostly for home studio, monitoring, recording, though perhaps using my in ear Beoplay headphones, furnishes a good, loyal to the output, sound. But of course having a decent louddpeaker/monitor sound is important too. I mostly play the synth outputting it through the speakers.

    I bought the lucas Nano Pa to have all in one, and that being easy to carry too.

    3) When gigging, it will be small to medium sized venues.

    I have been studying those near field monitors. Do you think the JBL 305 woULD BE A good solution? They are 5" cones.

    Thanks
    Dino
     
    Dino, Jul 8, 2018
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  13. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    The JBL's look OK but the proof would be in the listening.

    And you would still need a decent subwoofer to fill in the low end.

    Personally here's what I'm using ...

    A pair of these :

    https://www.amazon.com/M-Audio-BX5-D3-Powered-Reference/dp/B01J66YEU0

    And one of these for the low end.

    https://www.monoprice.com/product?c_id=109&cp_id=10906&cs_id=1090602&p_id=8248&seq=1&format=2

    I don't gig but for gigging if I did at small venues I also own one of these for another keyboard I use in another room.

    https://www.amazon.com/Behringer-K450FX-BEHRINGER-ULTRATONE/dp/B000MJ9EBA/

    I use both of these solutions in a soundproof high rise apartment but I've never really needed to crank either one up past 3 or 4 in practical play.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Jul 8, 2018
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  14. Jon Yoder.

    Dino

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    Yes you are right, I need to go to a local store, preferably my music store and hear the synth or another yamaha piano through them.

    I have also checked out Edifier R1280T and Polk Audio Tsi 100, both at 100 bucks, with high review scores. I think the polk has 5" bass cones whereas Edifier 4". Perhaps the bigger is better?
    I prefer smaller monitors than the louder sounding Lucas Nano, since I easily get it turned up too loud and that is unhealthy when you sit just beside them. Of cpurse I tried turning them awsy from the ears but then the sound is compromised.

    Txs
    Dino
     
    Dino, Jul 9, 2018
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  15. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    I own a pair of Edifier R1280T's that I use hooked up to my bedroom TV. They sound relatively decent and they look good, but the max volume level is barely comparable to a set of built in speakers on a Casio CTK keyboard.

    And you would still face a lack of bass without a subwoofer.

    At this point I'm confused. You say that sound quality is your penultimate concern regardless of budget, yet you are looking at stuff in the range of $100 to $150 per pair.

    At this point I'd advise going to a music store and listening to a pair of KRK Rockit 5's or Yamaha Nearfield or M-Audio BX5 speakers and comparing them to a $150 pair of plastic computer grade speakers yourself.

    It's up to you to decide which you can live with but it sounds to me like you budget is half what it should be.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Jul 9, 2018
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  16. Jon Yoder.

    Dino

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    Oh I thought you recommended shelf speakers. Also the reviews of those speakers mentioned were so positive and someone said they were better than other alternatives, but perhaps those are being paid for writing.

    I just want a good sound, and if for 100 the sound is clear, and dgx660 has only 2*6 w, then I don't see the point in investing something big and loud. Its rather the quality that counts. Also those mentioned are found in bigger versions at 200. Again if only for monitoring and not for gigging then a not too loud but clear, rather flat sound is better right? It depends on the room of course. As for now I don't live in a castle.

    As mentioned before, being in Europe, various factors are involved such as the products being easily accessible without large shipping costs and Iva, ease of repair. But those in the US I check if they are available here too, then if not I move on. Ridiculous to pay 250% the price.

    I actually had some krk in the past but they were loud despite i had isolation everywhere on the floor and part of the walls in rhe 2. Store apartment.they cost 1200 $, but I sold them with a piano. The dgx 660's inbuilt speakers were much better for studio recording and monitoring.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
    Dino, Jul 9, 2018
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  17. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    Actually it's an old rule of audiophiles that you usually get at least double or more the power you need for comfortable listening.

    This is because audio signals have a wide dynamic range, especially electronic keyboards, so you want to avoid overdriving the speakers to distortion on the peaks.

    Even if you are in a somewhat acoustically active apartment building I would not recommend less than 40 watts per channel for the best listening experience.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Jul 9, 2018
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  18. Jon Yoder.

    Dino

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    Thank you. I will use the advice
     
    Dino, Jul 9, 2018
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  19. Jon Yoder.

    happyrat1 Destroyer of Eardrums!!!

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    You're welcome and good luck.

    Like I said earlier, there's no substitute for giving the speakers a good listen before you buy.

    Specs can tell you a lot, but only if you know how to read them.

    Gary ;)
     
    happyrat1, Jul 9, 2018
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  20. Jon Yoder.

    Calldon

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    I use these, sometimes with a subwoofer, for a Hauptwerk digital organ system. But for what you need, the price is right. They've been on sale for $199. I noticed a they are back up to $249. Still a good price for some nice sounding powered monitors. Take a Y-adapter from the headphone Jack and run a cable to each speaker. You'll sound like you're in Carnegie Hall.
    https://www.monoprice.com/product?p...snUba1BssKkq2DFAIlFMS7QUauJEOHxoCCzUQAvD_BwE#
     
    Calldon, Jul 27, 2018
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