Yamaha PSR EW 300 vs EW 410


Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Dear all,
Thank you so much for accepting me on this group. I am an engineer by profession and I have recently developed an interest in the piano. Needless to say, the real thing is quite out of my reach and I am looking for a decently priced keyboard that will offer me opportunity to study basics of classical music and play a few pieces too. I have narrowed down to Yamaha PSR EW 300 and EW 410. I am not really looking for an instrument that has hundreds of sounds but something that offers only decent piano sounds.
EW 300 spec says touch response: YES and that of EW 410 says touch response: Soft, Medium, Hard, Fixed. Does this mean that the touch response of EW 410 is superior to that of EW 300?
I am not really looking for all the non-piano (Arranger features) that the EW 410 offers.
Any advice is most appriciated.
Thanks in advance. :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
3,515
Reaction score
1,504
The PSR-EW300 has the same Soft/Medium/Hard/Fixed Touch Response options as the PSR-EW410. If you go to Yamaha's website, you can download the Owner's Manual and other documents (Data List, MIDI Reference, etc.) for the PSR-EW300, PSR-EW410, or other models that you might be interested in. Perusing those documents is a good way to see what features a particular model has, including seeing pictures of what panel controls are available for accessing those features, as well as what the screen display looks like for the associated functions.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
The PSR-EW300 has the same Soft/Medium/Hard/Fixed Touch Response options as the PSR-EW410. If you go to Yamaha's website, you can download the Owner's Manual and other documents (Data List, MIDI Reference, etc.) for the PSR-EW300, PSR-EW410, or other models that you might be interested in. Perusing those documents is a good way to see what features a particular model has, including seeing pictures of what panel controls are available for accessing those features, as well as what the screen display looks like for the associated functions.

Thank you so much for the quick and to-the-point reply. It will be most useful in making the decision, I am sure :)
 

SeaGtGruff

I meant to play that note!
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
3,515
Reaction score
1,504
Well, as you can see in my sig lines, I own a number of PSR-E models, although I don't own either the PSR-EW300 or PSR-EW410. I'm happy enough with mine, but there are members here who would likely recommend other brands over Yamaha. I won't take sides, but I would recommend that you visit the music stores in your area and-- if possible-- try out any particular brands and models of keyboard that you might be interested in, so you can see how the keys feel and how satisfactory the sounds are. The PSR-E models have unweighted synth-action keys, and some people don't like the way they feel and respond when you're playing. If you're mainly interested in a keyboard for its piano sounds, you might want to consider a keyboard that has weighted or even just semi-weighted piano-style ("box shaped") keys.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Well, as you can see in my sig lines, I own a number of PSR-E models, although I don't own either the PSR-EW300 or PSR-EW410. I'm happy enough with mine, but there are members here who would likely recommend other brands over Yamaha. I won't take sides, but I would recommend that you visit the music stores in your area and-- if possible-- try out any particular brands and models of keyboard that you might be interested in, so you can see how the keys feel and how satisfactory the sounds are. The PSR-E models have unweighted synth-action keys, and some people don't like the way they feel and respond when you're playing. If you're mainly interested in a keyboard for its piano sounds, you might want to consider a keyboard that has weighted or even just semi-weighted piano-style ("box shaped") keys.
Thank you so much :) Will do it.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
3,749
Reaction score
2,293
Location
Lancashire, UK.
Welcome.

I am with Michael, visit a Music Store to look at and play a few different makes and models.

In a Music Store the Sales staff should be helpful and keen to ensure you buy the right instrument to get you started for they will want your business for the rest of the gear you will need like stand, bench, books and even lessons. If you are in doubt about a Store move on to another. If they do not have a balanced mix of makes and models they will steer you towards a particular make.

If you want to learn to play a piano then why not buy a digital piano or a keyboard that like a true piano has 88 keys with hammer action.

The PSR EW410 has 76 keys with a menu driven adjustment, this will not have the feel of a true hammer action keyboard.

Consider:-

Roland FP 10 or 30
Yamaha P45 or 115
Casio CDP S100
Numa compact

Or simply for fun learning a Roland Go Piano, Roland quality and sound in a very affordable keyboard.

Do critically look at the build quality of the keyboards, press buttons to assess their feel, look at the quality of materials used in the construction of the keyboard. In other words physically compare them then play them and the sound quality will vary depending upon make and model.

Finally you get what you pay for, quality costs.

Good luck and do search through the Resources posts about learning materials.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top